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Ask Jay P. Mercado

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  • PlankingDonutPlankingDonut Member PEx Rookie ⭐
    Jess24 said:
    Jess24 said:
    Curiously, Toyota and Ginebra (when Jaworski was head coach) never had a caucasian import...
    For some reason Carlos "Red" Briggs appeared to be more Caucasian than black to me when he played here :lol:

    Ryan Fletcher had one of the best nicknames ever - The Great White Hope :lol:
    Briggs was probably the closest to being a non-black among all the Ginebra imports that Jaworski brought in from 1985 to 1997. He's not caucasian obviously, it's a cross breed that I could never understand. For whatever reason, Briggs never really warmed up to me. He was an absolute offensive menace, undoubtedly, but it was also his inability to defend that filed Añejo from overcoming a more superior SMB team that had Ennis Whatley and a phalanx of superstars led by Mon Fernandez. My favorite Ginebra imports remain to be Bates, Hackett, Waller, and Steve Hood. I distinctly remember in the mid to late 80's that whenever the Big J brought in his import, there were so much expectations because Jawo really had an eye in getting the import that he needed. Plus the fact that his agent, Sonny Unera, was serving Ginebra only, while the other known import agent, Bobby Rius, served the other 5 teams.

    Fletcher was the epitome of what Jacobs thought was best for Ginebra - a blue collar worker who rebounded ferociously, defended passionately, and uncomplaining. Jacobs probably felt that this ethic that Ginebra was known for when the Big J was still at the helm would be ideal for them. Alas, Jacobs may have forgotten that Jawo's imports, apart from being hardworkers, are also prolific and do-it-all. Fletcher's inability to dominate on the offensive end was too much of a void that the locals of Aquino / Limpot, Locsin, Hizon, David, Lago, etc. could fill. 


    That's a curious list of favorites there. Bates and Hackett, I get it, but I never knew Waller and especially Hood were high on your list too.

    Me, my favorites (aside from BRB and Hackett) were Sly Gray and the pair of Tommy Davis and Joe Ward. 
    In 1994, my hopes were high for a resounding comeback by the team (then called Tondeña 65). There was an initial disappointment when Marlou Aquino couldn't join the draft because he withdrew his application brought about by his inability to complete the required 54 academic units in college. IIRC, Marlou was only able to pass 24 units after 3 years in college (you wonder what he was doing in school at that time - that's like 4 units passed per semester). The Big J attended the draft ceremonies after years of absence and got the best player in the draft - Noli Locsin. And just like that, Locsin became part of my favorite Ginebra players of all time, and one of my favorite basketball players of all time.

    They didn't do well in the All Filipino, winning only two games. They did better in the Commissioner's Cup, winning 5 of 11 games but failed to make the playoffs. The entry of NBA veteran Mitchell Wiggins (replacing Darrin Mayo) kept my dream alive for a comeback but despite his offensive prowess, he couldn't carry the team past the elimination round. 

    In the 3rd Conference, Merlin Kimbrew was a total dud and I pretty much gave up hope on the flogging season. Then Hood came in and won a few games that made me believe again. Sure, Tondeña failed to get past the elims once more, winning 5 of 10 games, but, IIRC, 4 of those came when Hood arrived. He was a hardworking, do-it-all guy who did his work at both ends of the court. Wala lang talaga maasahan, except for Noli and Pido. I've always said that a team is in trouble if Sonny Cabatu would topscore for them. True enough. But Hood made a lasting impression and I really thought he would be rehired. He wasn't. 

    Bates was a given because he's my fave import of all time, dating back from his Crispa days. And there's no denying he was the best ever. Hackett is endearing because even if he joined Ginebra when I was still partly cheering for Shell in 1985 (after Crispa disbanded), he was so easy to like because of his work ethic and ease to score inside. Waller was the prototypical import of Jawo - extremely hardworking, never complaining, brute force inside but can equally score well outside, do-it-all, non-complaining and doesn't seem to get tired. He took so much responsibility for the team on both ends of the court and if not for some bad luck, Ginebra could've been in the 1987 Governors' Cup Finals. They won the first two games in the semis (against eventual finalists GTC and Tanduay at that), but lost their last four.
    Mitchelle wiggins? tatay ni andrew wiggins yan dba? 
    93 -95 was indeed the dark years of Ginebra. I dunno, if Ginebra was tanking but they keep on signing unwanted veterans then like Cabatu, Victorino, Alolor n etc. in fairness he kept the core of Jarencio, locsin, gayoso, de joya, Hizon. Feihl i thought was promising but his height really all that matters. 
  • Jay P. MercadoJay P. Mercado Moderator PEx Moderator
    Jess24 said:
    Jess24 said:
    Curiously, Toyota and Ginebra (when Jaworski was head coach) never had a caucasian import...
    For some reason Carlos "Red" Briggs appeared to be more Caucasian than black to me when he played here :lol:

    Ryan Fletcher had one of the best nicknames ever - The Great White Hope :lol:
    Briggs was probably the closest to being a non-black among all the Ginebra imports that Jaworski brought in from 1985 to 1997. He's not caucasian obviously, it's a cross breed that I could never understand. For whatever reason, Briggs never really warmed up to me. He was an absolute offensive menace, undoubtedly, but it was also his inability to defend that filed Añejo from overcoming a more superior SMB team that had Ennis Whatley and a phalanx of superstars led by Mon Fernandez. My favorite Ginebra imports remain to be Bates, Hackett, Waller, and Steve Hood. I distinctly remember in the mid to late 80's that whenever the Big J brought in his import, there were so much expectations because Jawo really had an eye in getting the import that he needed. Plus the fact that his agent, Sonny Unera, was serving Ginebra only, while the other known import agent, Bobby Rius, served the other 5 teams.

    Fletcher was the epitome of what Jacobs thought was best for Ginebra - a blue collar worker who rebounded ferociously, defended passionately, and uncomplaining. Jacobs probably felt that this ethic that Ginebra was known for when the Big J was still at the helm would be ideal for them. Alas, Jacobs may have forgotten that Jawo's imports, apart from being hardworkers, are also prolific and do-it-all. Fletcher's inability to dominate on the offensive end was too much of a void that the locals of Aquino / Limpot, Locsin, Hizon, David, Lago, etc. could fill. 


    That's a curious list of favorites there. Bates and Hackett, I get it, but I never knew Waller and especially Hood were high on your list too.

    Me, my favorites (aside from BRB and Hackett) were Sly Gray and the pair of Tommy Davis and Joe Ward. 
    In 1994, my hopes were high for a resounding comeback by the team (then called Tondeña 65). There was an initial disappointment when Marlou Aquino couldn't join the draft because he withdrew his application brought about by his inability to complete the required 54 academic units in college. IIRC, Marlou was only able to pass 24 units after 3 years in college (you wonder what he was doing in school at that time - that's like 4 units passed per semester). The Big J attended the draft ceremonies after years of absence and got the best player in the draft - Noli Locsin. And just like that, Locsin became part of my favorite Ginebra players of all time, and one of my favorite basketball players of all time.

    They didn't do well in the All Filipino, winning only two games. They did better in the Commissioner's Cup, winning 5 of 11 games but failed to make the playoffs. The entry of NBA veteran Mitchell Wiggins (replacing Darrin Mayo) kept my dream alive for a comeback but despite his offensive prowess, he couldn't carry the team past the elimination round. 

    In the 3rd Conference, Merlin Kimbrew was a total dud and I pretty much gave up hope on the flogging season. Then Hood came in and won a few games that made me believe again. Sure, Tondeña failed to get past the elims once more, winning 5 of 10 games, but, IIRC, 4 of those came when Hood arrived. He was a hardworking, do-it-all guy who did his work at both ends of the court. Wala lang talaga maasahan, except for Noli and Pido. I've always said that a team is in trouble if Sonny Cabatu would topscore for them. True enough. But Hood made a lasting impression and I really thought he would be rehired. He wasn't. 

    Bates was a given because he's my fave import of all time, dating back from his Crispa days. And there's no denying he was the best ever. Hackett is endearing because even if he joined Ginebra when I was still partly cheering for Shell in 1985 (after Crispa disbanded), he was so easy to like because of his work ethic and ease to score inside. Waller was the prototypical import of Jawo - extremely hardworking, never complaining, brute force inside but can equally score well outside, do-it-all, non-complaining and doesn't seem to get tired. He took so much responsibility for the team on both ends of the court and if not for some bad luck, Ginebra could've been in the 1987 Governors' Cup Finals. They won the first two games in the semis (against eventual finalists GTC and Tanduay at that), but lost their last four.
    Mitchelle wiggins? tatay ni andrew wiggins yan dba? 
    93 -95 was indeed the dark years of Ginebra. I dunno, if Ginebra was tanking but they keep on signing unwanted veterans then like Cabatu, Victorino, Alolor n etc. in fairness he kept the core of Jarencio, locsin, gayoso, de joya, Hizon. Feihl i thought was promising but his height really all that matters. 
    Yup, that's Andrew Wiggins' dad. Played for the Houston Rockets from 1984 until 1987 and was in the NBA Finals against the Celtics. He and Lewis Lloyd tested positive for cocaine after the Finals and was suspended for two seasons. Extremely prolific player, in the mold of the prototype Ginebra import, but was already 35 years old and could hardly play defense. 

    I don't think it was deliberate. First, they were unfortunate when they lost their key players in Leo Isaac, Rey Cuenco and Rudy Distrito. They did get Pido Jarencio, Sonny Cabatu and Tonichi Yturri in return but quality-wise, you can see the dip. Second, they didn't actually draft well in 1992 and 1993. Because of their outstanding performance in 1991, they drafted last in the first round, acquiring Nonoy Chuatico who didn't pan out. Upon hindsight, it wouldn't have been bad if Jaworski got Bonel Balingit instead and developed him just to make sure he had a big man inside. In 1993, they drafted Vic Pablo who balked at the team's 90k offer (wanting the 100k salary max instead) and was eventually traded to Pepsi for Manny Victorino. Jaworski also missed out on getting Johnny Abarrientos, who was drafted after Pablo. That was Jawo's fault though, because at that time, since he can still play, he wasn't too partial with smaller players and instead, wanted to go big. Which was eventually resolved by the drafting of Noli Locsin, EJ Feihl and Marlou Aquino from 1994-1996. Of course, Jawo made another boo-boo by getting Feihl instead of Kenneth Duremdes. 

    The other reason is because of budgetary constraints. The Ginebra before isn't like the Ginebra today that's awashed with funds. That time, Ginebra had the least budget among all 8 teams and it showed in the quality of their roster. Which was why in as much as we would have wanted to get big names like Nelson Asaytono or Al Solis or Alvin Teng or Bong Alvarez, Ginebra just couldn't afford. 
  • CaptainCharismaCaptainCharisma Moderator PEx Moderator
    JPM, bakit wala tayong na-establish na annual international tournament like the Jones Cup in Taiwan and Stankovic Cup in China. I know there was a MVP Cup a few years back but wala bang effort dati to establish an international competition here? That would have helped a lot since it will provide consistent exposure for our national team to the international brand of play.
    Agree. We never really had one. The closest that we had was the PBA Invitational Conference when the league invited foreign teams to join the 3rd Conference of the season. We've had our share in 1977 (Emtex Sacronels of Brazil and Ramrod Blocks of Australia), 1980 (Nicholas Stoodley of the US and Adidas of France), 1982 (South Korea national team), and 2003 (KK Novi Sad of Yugoslavia, Yonsei University of South Korea, Magnolia-Jilin of China and the PHL team). There were also exhibition games like the visiting Angolan team in 2014, the visiting Sydney Kings team of Australia in 2002, the Chinese national teams of 1978, the Liaoning Tigers of 1991, among many others. 

    I'm guessing it's the logistical factors that pose a problem. Not only in terms of cost, but also accommodations, meals, etc. Which isn't really much of a problem knowing how good Filipinos are when it comes to events management. Ergo, the cost must be considerable for an annual tournament to be justified.

    Taiwan's been doing the Jones Cup for more than 4 decades already but part of this is because they need to stay relevant, considering that China and several countries don't regard them as a sovereign nation. The Jones Cup is one tournament where other countries get the opportunity of seeing the Republic of China as different from the People's Republic of China. 

    To be honest, I feel that the SBP has been scrimping in terms of cost. Can't really blame them because they've spent so much already. There were also other factors beyond their control (like the unavailability of the players because of the league sked) but in general, the costs incurred by this national team isn't even 1/10th of what the 2014 iteration spent. I'm afraid this team has been unconsciously designed to fail - by the SBP, by the PBA, even the players.

    And doing the math, if Chot's 2014 team placed 21st out of 24 teams, then the equivalent should be 28th out of 32 teams this year - meaning they would have matched Chot's accomplishment if they end up 28th overall. Anything above 28th means surpassing the success of 2014, anything below would be a poorer performance.

    But given the circumstances that Yeng had to undergo today, it may take more than a miracle to wind up 28th. He doesn't have Jayson, he lost two crucial shooters (Matt and Cio), RR, JMF and Troy have less than two weeks to prepare, scouting has been scarce and limited, among many others.
    Perhaps the SBP can institute the Baumann Cup? Jones and Stankovic are the other former FIBA Secretary Generals and had tournaments to honor them and it's only apt that we can honor the late Baumann who had a good relationship with our leadership. 

    May nakukuha bang funding ang SBP from the government? or purely from the pockets of MVP ang budget nyan? 
  • Jay P. MercadoJay P. Mercado Moderator PEx Moderator
    JPM, bakit wala tayong na-establish na annual international tournament like the Jones Cup in Taiwan and Stankovic Cup in China. I know there was a MVP Cup a few years back but wala bang effort dati to establish an international competition here? That would have helped a lot since it will provide consistent exposure for our national team to the international brand of play.
    Agree. We never really had one. The closest that we had was the PBA Invitational Conference when the league invited foreign teams to join the 3rd Conference of the season. We've had our share in 1977 (Emtex Sacronels of Brazil and Ramrod Blocks of Australia), 1980 (Nicholas Stoodley of the US and Adidas of France), 1982 (South Korea national team), and 2003 (KK Novi Sad of Yugoslavia, Yonsei University of South Korea, Magnolia-Jilin of China and the PHL team). There were also exhibition games like the visiting Angolan team in 2014, the visiting Sydney Kings team of Australia in 2002, the Chinese national teams of 1978, the Liaoning Tigers of 1991, among many others. 

    I'm guessing it's the logistical factors that pose a problem. Not only in terms of cost, but also accommodations, meals, etc. Which isn't really much of a problem knowing how good Filipinos are when it comes to events management. Ergo, the cost must be considerable for an annual tournament to be justified.

    Taiwan's been doing the Jones Cup for more than 4 decades already but part of this is because they need to stay relevant, considering that China and several countries don't regard them as a sovereign nation. The Jones Cup is one tournament where other countries get the opportunity of seeing the Republic of China as different from the People's Republic of China. 

    To be honest, I feel that the SBP has been scrimping in terms of cost. Can't really blame them because they've spent so much already. There were also other factors beyond their control (like the unavailability of the players because of the league sked) but in general, the costs incurred by this national team isn't even 1/10th of what the 2014 iteration spent. I'm afraid this team has been unconsciously designed to fail - by the SBP, by the PBA, even the players.

    And doing the math, if Chot's 2014 team placed 21st out of 24 teams, then the equivalent should be 28th out of 32 teams this year - meaning they would have matched Chot's accomplishment if they end up 28th overall. Anything above 28th means surpassing the success of 2014, anything below would be a poorer performance.

    But given the circumstances that Yeng had to undergo today, it may take more than a miracle to wind up 28th. He doesn't have Jayson, he lost two crucial shooters (Matt and Cio), RR, JMF and Troy have less than two weeks to prepare, scouting has been scarce and limited, among many others.
    Perhaps the SBP can institute the Baumann Cup? Jones and Stankovic are the other former FIBA Secretary Generals and had tournaments to honor them and it's only apt that we can honor the late Baumann who had a good relationship with our leadership. 

    May nakukuha bang funding ang SBP from the government? or purely from the pockets of MVP ang budget nyan? 
    Normally, may allocation yan sa PSC (the government arm) lalo na kung maganda performance sa international scene. The PSC sets aside budget for each NSA, with the bigger amount going to medal-rich sports like athletics and swimming because these offer better chances for our athletes to win. But there's also budget set aside for sports that have higher potential like golf, weightlifting, boxing, etc. 

    Since basketball only offers 1 gold each for men's and women's, and perhaps, 1 each for 3x3, the allocation isn't comparable to athletics. But because the preparation is also more expensive because it's a team sport (12 players) compared to individual sports, whatever amount given by the PSC is insignificant. The bulk remains with the MVP Group.

    As for the proposed Baumann Cup, it's actually a sound idea but can we afford it? As mentioned, it's logistically expensive, especially if one will bring at least 7 teams to play a week-long tournament not unlike the Jones Cup. That's easily P5M for accommodations alone and doesn't include plane fare, venue rental, etc. I'm guessing cost would be somewhere like P60M per tournament. But if you send our national team abroad, the SBP will probably spend only a quarter of that amount.
  • drei221drei221 Headbang PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    JPM, what can you comment on Yeng's performance in the WC? Para sa akin kasi parang hindi "nagko coach" eh. Iba sa nakasanayan na natin na Yeng. He always want his players to figure out things in the game, pero huwag naman sa point na si Caloy na ang tatawag ng TO. Tapos si Ravena, as if may naka reserve na talagang slot at playing time para sa kanya (though baka basbas na ni MVP). Also the set plays are all limited. Nandun na na maigsi preparation pero sana bawiin na lang at dagdagan ng L!b0g ang pagko coach to fire up the players.
  • Jay P. MercadoJay P. Mercado Moderator PEx Moderator
    drei221 said:
    JPM, what can you comment on Yeng's performance in the WC? Para sa akin kasi parang hindi "nagko coach" eh. Iba sa nakasanayan na natin na Yeng. He always want his players to figure out things in the game, pero huwag naman sa point na si Caloy na ang tatawag ng TO. Tapos si Ravena, as if may naka reserve na talagang slot at playing time para sa kanya (though baka basbas na ni MVP). Also the set plays are all limited. Nandun na na maigsi preparation pero sana bawiin na lang at dagdagan ng L!b0g ang pagko coach to fire up the players.
    Disappointing, to say the least. I understand the quality of the competition and while I was hoping we'd find ourselves landing a second round slot, it just won't be easy. There were a lot of non-controllables on his part - the lack of preparation, the injuries of key players, the conditioning of Blatche, etc. 

    But there were a lot of things within his control as well. I felt the outcome of the Italy game was decided in the first 6 minutes alone. When Yeng didn't call a timeout, when Yeng didn't replace any of his starters, when there was hardly any plays given to the shooters, when the team couldn't adjust immediately - and these are just a few, you wonder if the blowout would have been prevented.

    Yeng's strong points have always been founded on familiarity and chemistry of his team - something he didn't have the luxury of because of lack of preparation. But that can be mitigated by setting up the proper plays and not allow those on the floor to simply free-wheel when they aren't too familiar with each other. You can do this in the regional level and get away with it. But not in elite competition.

    Simply put, part of the lack of preparation was also the inability of Yeng to devise a solid game plan against the opponents. He couldn't even come up with a system that will allow the players to focus on their respective strengths.

    I wouldn't say we would have won against Italy and Serbia had there been a different coach. But you look at the team and you know they're underwhelming and underperforming. For this, obviously, it's the coach who should take the flak, deservingly.

    Even under Tab or Chot, we would have still been defeated by Italy and Serbia. The outcome won't change. But when you see evident mistakes happening from the bench that could have been prevented, it's easy to find the faults. 

    Then of course, you wonder if his substitution patterns were planned. In the 4th quarter of the Angola game, the five on the floor - Blatche, Aguilar, Pogoy, Perez and Ravena practically ate up all the minutes. Bolick, who was given 10 minutes of floor burn and still delivered 10 points in an efficient performance, should have been there to replace Ravena, especially after the rally was consummated. Norwood could have been utilized in situational plays to provide defense - especially against Moore who killed us with his timely treys, or Joaquim, who ate up our guards' defense. Junemar, who couldn't find his rhythm, could have spelled Aguilar in the critical juncture of the 4th since we were playing percentage basketball already and Angola was able to resolve our transition offense.  

    Yeng though made the right move when he put in Pogoy at #3 at the start of the 4th, going small ball. It allowed us to speed up our game that broke down Angola's defense and gave us more opportunities of scoring outside. But somehow, Yeng forgot to make some changes in the lineup when needed, especially when we took the lead.

    In this kind of tournament, you can't live and die with motivation alone. You simply just can't rely on the individual skills of the players - you create opportunities for them to exploit their strengths. Yeng just wasn't the right guy out there.

    But let's see. The overall outlook may still change but that will only happen if we are able to snatch the title of best Asian team and earn for us the automatic berth in Asia. It'll be tough, since we lost to Angola, meaning one more loss against either Iran or Tunisia would seal our fate. But if by some twist of fate we succeed, then perhaps, perception may still end up favoring Yeng. But it won't be easy....
  • dilawandilawan PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    Ser JPM, where do we go from here? i understand there will be calls to scrap this program and start from scratch. 
  • Max_BuwayaMax_Buwaya Member PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    kawawa talaga pinas 'no?  'kada pagkatapos ng anumang gyera o eleksyon, back to the drawing board na naman..
  • BeansDaPrinceBeansDaPrince Member PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    JPM, magchachampion na kaya ang UP this season? Ayoko na umasa :lol: 
  • Jay P. MercadoJay P. Mercado Moderator PEx Moderator
    dilawan said:
    Ser JPM, where do we go from here? i understand there will be calls to scrap this program and start from scratch. 
    If you're asking what the SBP will do, no one knows yet. Even the SBP. When they come home, the first thing they can do, after coming up with a post-tourney report, is to have a basketball summit featuring all the stakeholders of basketball in the country. This would include the PBA, the collegiate leagues, even the MPBL, the corporate sponsors, among many others. 

    It's about time we come up with a long-term program designed specifically for 2023. Otherwise, we'll end up getting embarrassed at home.
  • Jay P. MercadoJay P. Mercado Moderator PEx Moderator
    JPM, magchachampion na kaya ang UP this season? Ayoko na umasa :lol: 
    Not too confident. Masarap sila panoorin, dami highlight plays for sure, but in the end, this will still be an ADMU dominance. That's how good Tab is...
  • PlankingDonutPlankingDonut Member PEx Rookie ⭐
    Jess24 said:
    Jess24 said:
    Curiously, Toyota and Ginebra (when Jaworski was head coach) never had a caucasian import...
    For some reason Carlos "Red" Briggs appeared to be more Caucasian than black to me when he played here :lol:

    Ryan Fletcher had one of the best nicknames ever - The Great White Hope :lol:
    Briggs was probably the closest to being a non-black among all the Ginebra imports that Jaworski brought in from 1985 to 1997. He's not caucasian obviously, it's a cross breed that I could never understand. For whatever reason, Briggs never really warmed up to me. He was an absolute offensive menace, undoubtedly, but it was also his inability to defend that filed Añejo from overcoming a more superior SMB team that had Ennis Whatley and a phalanx of superstars led by Mon Fernandez. My favorite Ginebra imports remain to be Bates, Hackett, Waller, and Steve Hood. I distinctly remember in the mid to late 80's that whenever the Big J brought in his import, there were so much expectations because Jawo really had an eye in getting the import that he needed. Plus the fact that his agent, Sonny Unera, was serving Ginebra only, while the other known import agent, Bobby Rius, served the other 5 teams.

    Fletcher was the epitome of what Jacobs thought was best for Ginebra - a blue collar worker who rebounded ferociously, defended passionately, and uncomplaining. Jacobs probably felt that this ethic that Ginebra was known for when the Big J was still at the helm would be ideal for them. Alas, Jacobs may have forgotten that Jawo's imports, apart from being hardworkers, are also prolific and do-it-all. Fletcher's inability to dominate on the offensive end was too much of a void that the locals of Aquino / Limpot, Locsin, Hizon, David, Lago, etc. could fill. 


    That's a curious list of favorites there. Bates and Hackett, I get it, but I never knew Waller and especially Hood were high on your list too.

    Me, my favorites (aside from BRB and Hackett) were Sly Gray and the pair of Tommy Davis and Joe Ward. 
    In 1994, my hopes were high for a resounding comeback by the team (then called Tondeña 65). There was an initial disappointment when Marlou Aquino couldn't join the draft because he withdrew his application brought about by his inability to complete the required 54 academic units in college. IIRC, Marlou was only able to pass 24 units after 3 years in college (you wonder what he was doing in school at that time - that's like 4 units passed per semester). The Big J attended the draft ceremonies after years of absence and got the best player in the draft - Noli Locsin. And just like that, Locsin became part of my favorite Ginebra players of all time, and one of my favorite basketball players of all time.

    They didn't do well in the All Filipino, winning only two games. They did better in the Commissioner's Cup, winning 5 of 11 games but failed to make the playoffs. The entry of NBA veteran Mitchell Wiggins (replacing Darrin Mayo) kept my dream alive for a comeback but despite his offensive prowess, he couldn't carry the team past the elimination round. 

    In the 3rd Conference, Merlin Kimbrew was a total dud and I pretty much gave up hope on the flogging season. Then Hood came in and won a few games that made me believe again. Sure, Tondeña failed to get past the elims once more, winning 5 of 10 games, but, IIRC, 4 of those came when Hood arrived. He was a hardworking, do-it-all guy who did his work at both ends of the court. Wala lang talaga maasahan, except for Noli and Pido. I've always said that a team is in trouble if Sonny Cabatu would topscore for them. True enough. But Hood made a lasting impression and I really thought he would be rehired. He wasn't. 

    Bates was a given because he's my fave import of all time, dating back from his Crispa days. And there's no denying he was the best ever. Hackett is endearing because even if he joined Ginebra when I was still partly cheering for Shell in 1985 (after Crispa disbanded), he was so easy to like because of his work ethic and ease to score inside. Waller was the prototypical import of Jawo - extremely hardworking, never complaining, brute force inside but can equally score well outside, do-it-all, non-complaining and doesn't seem to get tired. He took so much responsibility for the team on both ends of the court and if not for some bad luck, Ginebra could've been in the 1987 Governors' Cup Finals. They won the first two games in the semis (against eventual finalists GTC and Tanduay at that), but lost their last four.
    Mitchelle wiggins? tatay ni andrew wiggins yan dba? 
    93 -95 was indeed the dark years of Ginebra. I dunno, if Ginebra was tanking but they keep on signing unwanted veterans then like Cabatu, Victorino, Alolor n etc. in fairness he kept the core of Jarencio, locsin, gayoso, de joya, Hizon. Feihl i thought was promising but his height really all that matters. 
    Yup, that's Andrew Wiggins' dad. Played for the Houston Rockets from 1984 until 1987 and was in the NBA Finals against the Celtics. He and Lewis Lloyd tested positive for cocaine after the Finals and was suspended for two seasons. Extremely prolific player, in the mold of the prototype Ginebra import, but was already 35 years old and could hardly play defense. 

    I don't think it was deliberate. First, they were unfortunate when they lost their key players in Leo Isaac, Rey Cuenco and Rudy Distrito. They did get Pido Jarencio, Sonny Cabatu and Tonichi Yturri in return but quality-wise, you can see the dip. Second, they didn't actually draft well in 1992 and 1993. Because of their outstanding performance in 1991, they drafted last in the first round, acquiring Nonoy Chuatico who didn't pan out. Upon hindsight, it wouldn't have been bad if Jaworski got Bonel Balingit instead and developed him just to make sure he had a big man inside. In 1993, they drafted Vic Pablo who balked at the team's 90k offer (wanting the 100k salary max instead) and was eventually traded to Pepsi for Manny Victorino. Jaworski also missed out on getting Johnny Abarrientos, who was drafted after Pablo. That was Jawo's fault though, because at that time, since he can still play, he wasn't too partial with smaller players and instead, wanted to go big. Which was eventually resolved by the drafting of Noli Locsin, EJ Feihl and Marlou Aquino from 1994-1996. Of course, Jawo made another boo-boo by getting Feihl instead of Kenneth Duremdes. 

    The other reason is because of budgetary constraints. The Ginebra before isn't like the Ginebra today that's awashed with funds. That time, Ginebra had the least budget among all 8 teams and it showed in the quality of their roster. Which was why in as much as we would have wanted to get big names like Nelson Asaytono or Al Solis or Alvin Teng or Bong Alvarez, Ginebra just couldn't afford. 

    Sir JaY p, meron pang isang nkalusot. I think Ginebra traded their 6th pick (errn not sure) for Bong Solomon. Solomon had vision problems already at that time and was no longer effective compared to his amateur years. the pick turned out to be Jeff Cariaso. Naisahan Ginebra nun. 

    The Vic pablo trade was just right. Pablo didnt found his niche until he landed on his 3rd team ( From 7up to SMB) which is Shell. Kung kumagat sila nun bka di nila makuha si Noli Locsin. 
  • PlankingDonutPlankingDonut Member PEx Rookie ⭐
    JPM, magchachampion na kaya ang UP this season? Ayoko na umasa :lol: 
    Not too confident. Masarap sila panoorin, dami highlight plays for sure, but in the end, this will still be an ADMU dominance. That's how good Tab is...
    I agree on this. Solid na system ni Tab. Another title should prove local coaches cant outsmart Tab Baldwin. 

    drei221 said:
    JPM, what can you comment on Yeng's performance in the WC? Para sa akin kasi parang hindi "nagko coach" eh. Iba sa nakasanayan na natin na Yeng. He always want his players to figure out things in the game, pero huwag naman sa point na si Caloy na ang tatawag ng TO. Tapos si Ravena, as if may naka reserve na talagang slot at playing time para sa kanya (though baka basbas na ni MVP). Also the set plays are all limited. Nandun na na maigsi preparation pero sana bawiin na lang at dagdagan ng L!b0g ang pagko coach to fire up the players.
    Disappointing, to say the least. I understand the quality of the competition and while I was hoping we'd find ourselves landing a second round slot, it just won't be easy. There were a lot of non-controllables on his part - the lack of preparation, the injuries of key players, the conditioning of Blatche, etc. 

    But there were a lot of things within his control as well. I felt the outcome of the Italy game was decided in the first 6 minutes alone. When Yeng didn't call a timeout, when Yeng didn't replace any of his starters, when there was hardly any plays given to the shooters, when the team couldn't adjust immediately - and these are just a few, you wonder if the blowout would have been prevented.

    Yeng's strong points have always been founded on familiarity and chemistry of his team - something he didn't have the luxury of because of lack of preparation. But that can be mitigated by setting up the proper plays and not allow those on the floor to simply free-wheel when they aren't too familiar with each other. You can do this in the regional level and get away with it. But not in elite competition.

    Simply put, part of the lack of preparation was also the inability of Yeng to devise a solid game plan against the opponents. He couldn't even come up with a system that will allow the players to focus on their respective strengths.

    I wouldn't say we would have won against Italy and Serbia had there been a different coach. But you look at the team and you know they're underwhelming and underperforming. For this, obviously, it's the coach who should take the flak, deservingly.

    Even under Tab or Chot, we would have still been defeated by Italy and Serbia. The outcome won't change. But when you see evident mistakes happening from the bench that could have been prevented, it's easy to find the faults. 

    Then of course, you wonder if his substitution patterns were planned. In the 4th quarter of the Angola game, the five on the floor - Blatche, Aguilar, Pogoy, Perez and Ravena practically ate up all the minutes. Bolick, who was given 10 minutes of floor burn and still delivered 10 points in an efficient performance, should have been there to replace Ravena, especially after the rally was consummated. Norwood could have been utilized in situational plays to provide defense - especially against Moore who killed us with his timely treys, or Joaquim, who ate up our guards' defense. Junemar, who couldn't find his rhythm, could have spelled Aguilar in the critical juncture of the 4th since we were playing percentage basketball already and Angola was able to resolve our transition offense.  

    Yeng though made the right move when he put in Pogoy at #3 at the start of the 4th, going small ball. It allowed us to speed up our game that broke down Angola's defense and gave us more opportunities of scoring outside. But somehow, Yeng forgot to make some changes in the lineup when needed, especially when we took the lead.

    In this kind of tournament, you can't live and die with motivation alone. You simply just can't rely on the individual skills of the players - you create opportunities for them to exploit their strengths. Yeng just wasn't the right guy out there.

    But let's see. The overall outlook may still change but that will only happen if we are able to snatch the title of best Asian team and earn for us the automatic berth in Asia. It'll be tough, since we lost to Angola, meaning one more loss against either Iran or Tunisia would seal our fate. But if by some twist of fate we succeed, then perhaps, perception may still end up favoring Yeng. But it won't be easy....
    Unfortunately our fate didnt twist. A match vs Iran will make us 0-5. For sure they will beat us black and blue. Iran will die fighting for that last olympic slot. And Yeng guiao is 0-3 against Iran (2009 and the last asian qualifiers). The only coach who was able to solve the Iran puzzle was Tab Baldwin. Remember that rag tag 2015 team? They even bagged the silver medal. Terrence Romeo, Calvin Abueva an Aging Asi Taulava, Hontiveros and Sonny Thoss. 
  • theblur17theblur17 PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    JPM, magchachampion na kaya ang UP this season? Ayoko na umasa :lol: 
    Not too confident. Masarap sila panoorin, dami highlight plays for sure, but in the end, this will still be an ADMU dominance. That's how good Tab is...
    I agree on this. Solid na system ni Tab. Another title should prove local coaches cant outsmart Tab Baldwin. 

    drei221 said:
    JPM, what can you comment on Yeng's performance in the WC? Para sa akin kasi parang hindi "nagko coach" eh. Iba sa nakasanayan na natin na Yeng. He always want his players to figure out things in the game, pero huwag naman sa point na si Caloy na ang tatawag ng TO. Tapos si Ravena, as if may naka reserve na talagang slot at playing time para sa kanya (though baka basbas na ni MVP). Also the set plays are all limited. Nandun na na maigsi preparation pero sana bawiin na lang at dagdagan ng L!b0g ang pagko coach to fire up the players.
    Disappointing, to say the least. I understand the quality of the competition and while I was hoping we'd find ourselves landing a second round slot, it just won't be easy. There were a lot of non-controllables on his part - the lack of preparation, the injuries of key players, the conditioning of Blatche, etc. 

    But there were a lot of things within his control as well. I felt the outcome of the Italy game was decided in the first 6 minutes alone. When Yeng didn't call a timeout, when Yeng didn't replace any of his starters, when there was hardly any plays given to the shooters, when the team couldn't adjust immediately - and these are just a few, you wonder if the blowout would have been prevented.

    Yeng's strong points have always been founded on familiarity and chemistry of his team - something he didn't have the luxury of because of lack of preparation. But that can be mitigated by setting up the proper plays and not allow those on the floor to simply free-wheel when they aren't too familiar with each other. You can do this in the regional level and get away with it. But not in elite competition.

    Simply put, part of the lack of preparation was also the inability of Yeng to devise a solid game plan against the opponents. He couldn't even come up with a system that will allow the players to focus on their respective strengths.

    I wouldn't say we would have won against Italy and Serbia had there been a different coach. But you look at the team and you know they're underwhelming and underperforming. For this, obviously, it's the coach who should take the flak, deservingly.

    Even under Tab or Chot, we would have still been defeated by Italy and Serbia. The outcome won't change. But when you see evident mistakes happening from the bench that could have been prevented, it's easy to find the faults. 

    Then of course, you wonder if his substitution patterns were planned. In the 4th quarter of the Angola game, the five on the floor - Blatche, Aguilar, Pogoy, Perez and Ravena practically ate up all the minutes. Bolick, who was given 10 minutes of floor burn and still delivered 10 points in an efficient performance, should have been there to replace Ravena, especially after the rally was consummated. Norwood could have been utilized in situational plays to provide defense - especially against Moore who killed us with his timely treys, or Joaquim, who ate up our guards' defense. Junemar, who couldn't find his rhythm, could have spelled Aguilar in the critical juncture of the 4th since we were playing percentage basketball already and Angola was able to resolve our transition offense.  

    Yeng though made the right move when he put in Pogoy at #3 at the start of the 4th, going small ball. It allowed us to speed up our game that broke down Angola's defense and gave us more opportunities of scoring outside. But somehow, Yeng forgot to make some changes in the lineup when needed, especially when we took the lead.

    In this kind of tournament, you can't live and die with motivation alone. You simply just can't rely on the individual skills of the players - you create opportunities for them to exploit their strengths. Yeng just wasn't the right guy out there.

    But let's see. The overall outlook may still change but that will only happen if we are able to snatch the title of best Asian team and earn for us the automatic berth in Asia. It'll be tough, since we lost to Angola, meaning one more loss against either Iran or Tunisia would seal our fate. But if by some twist of fate we succeed, then perhaps, perception may still end up favoring Yeng. But it won't be easy....
    Unfortunately our fate didnt twist. A match vs Iran will make us 0-5. For sure they will beat us black and blue. Iran will die fighting for that last olympic slot. And Yeng guiao is 0-3 against Iran (2009 and the last asian qualifiers). The only coach who was able to solve the Iran puzzle was Tab Baldwin. Remember that rag tag 2015 team? They even bagged the silver medal. Terrence Romeo, Calvin Abueva an Aging Asi Taulava, Hontiveros and Sonny Thoss. 
    Ang masakit pa nun sir we lost to Iran twice last year w/o haddadi and bahrami.. ngaun andyan pa sila eh malamang talo Tayo dyan.. mas ok siguro Iran manalo para sila magrepresent sa Olympics as Asian representative.. China s**ks at world level.. kahihiyan sa Asian basketball Ang performance nila in past 10 year or post yao Ming China team..
  • PlankingDonutPlankingDonut Member PEx Rookie ⭐
    Sir Jay p., un sabihan ba nman ang Gilas na "No quality" masakit na un. Allan Caidic find it too harsh daw pero totoo naman dba?  Europeans showed their offense by dribbling less and moving more with out the ball was a sight to behold. 


  • Jay P. MercadoJay P. Mercado Moderator PEx Moderator
    Sir Jay p., un sabihan ba nman ang Gilas na "No quality" masakit na un. Allan Caidic find it too harsh daw pero totoo naman dba?  Europeans showed their offense by dribbling less and moving more with out the ball was a sight to behold. 


    I think it was an emotional and heated response by Coach Dordevic when he said those words. This came after Dordevic felt Paul Lee's foul on one of his players was deliberate with an intent to hurt. Otherwise, he would have been more circumspect with his reaction.

    But it doesn't mean Dordevic didn't mean what he said. Without the Lee foul, he probably won't have said it as a respect to the Philippines. But because of the incident, siguro sa galit nya, he spoke what was on his mind.

    It's an opinion from a top Serbian coach who may end up being a world champ next week, so you know that's noteworthy. It's a legitimate perspective on his part as he was able to take a glance on how we played our game against them and Italy prior to that. And those two whitewashing losses will definitely justify such a viewpoint.

    Note as well that Euro coaches are never impressed with the American style of play. They never liked it, which is why they do not advocate this to their players. Of course, the Americans are merely taking advantage of their physical advantages that they have over their Euro counterparts, but we all know Europe (and South America as well) has found a way to find an antidote to such. The problem is that the Philippines' game is patterned more after the Americans, but with significantly less skills and talent. So now, you have a team forcing itself to play one-on-one basketball without the requisites of athleticism, skills and talent. That won't really spell RESPECT to our opponents. And yes lack of quality. 

    My only beef though is that Dordevic described how we played after only two games of watching us. Not to say he's wrong but it would have been more prudent on his part to find out if this is really the way we play our game in the country before making a conclusion. I won't be surprised if he turns out to be correct with his assessment after doing such - but then, it's just too encompassing. 

    In the end, quality is relative and can be quite subjective. I feel though that if we are to earn respect from the elite basketball nations of the world, we cannot play the same way we did this week. The last time we earned respect from all countries was in the mid-80's with NCC and Ron Jacobs at the helm. If younger fans feel that we earned this with Gilas 2.0 in the 2014 FIBA World Cup, this doesn't even approximate the massive outpouring of hossanah's we got from the international community featuring the NCC team. They saw naturalized players Dennis Still and Jeff Moore as just "ordinary players" but who did whatever role was given to them. They were impressed with Chip Engelland's shooting, which was a given since Engelland has been doing this at Duke before. What made them blush was Caidic's sniping, Samboy's fearless incursions, and Hector's orchestrating. Those three stood out from international coaches who got to play against us. And while they didn't really hail Ron Jacobs as a phenomenal coach (overseas, Jacobs' coaching was common fare among the others), it was obvious they were impressed with how the fiery American coach was able to maximize the talents of his players and make them work within a strong system that was capable of beating top teams overseas despite the absence of ceiling. 

    We have a chance to earn that RESPECT back. We have a chance to make Dordevic "eat his words." Go back to that NCC system with Tab at the helm and featuring our young players and no coach would ever dare question our ability to play quality ball.
  • BeansDaPrinceBeansDaPrince Member PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    JPM, what’s your stand on banning foreigners from getting a coaching job here? I don’t really understand where Guiao is coming from on this issue. We need that transfer of learning too if we are to compete on a global level, right? Masyado ba mawawalan ng opportunities ang homegrown coaches if we get coaches from other countries? Nakakatawa din lang kasi yung loophole na ginagawa silang “consultant” e alam naman natin lahat na it’s a farce. Personally, I’d rather see foreign coaches than imports sa college leagues. 
  • PlankingDonutPlankingDonut Member PEx Rookie ⭐
    JPM, what’s your stand on banning foreigners from getting a coaching job here? I don’t really understand where Guiao is coming from on this issue. We need that transfer of learning too if we are to compete on a global level, right? Masyado ba mawawalan ng opportunities ang homegrown coaches if we get coaches from other countries? Nakakatawa din lang kasi yung loophole na ginagawa silang “consultant” e alam naman natin lahat na it’s a farce. Personally, I’d rather see foreign coaches than imports sa college leagues. 

    Its good that hes protecting local coaches BUT basketball afterall is an imported sport brought here by the Americans. We are probably the first hand country in Asia to learn and to play the sport dahil nga sinakop nila tayo. Thats why we even bagged the Bronze in the 1954 World cup edition. Plus we were qualified numerous times in the olympics from 50s, 60s until 1972 . Then came the PBA. If im not mistaken, this group bolted out of then Basketball body called BAP. prang SBP ngayon. For some reasons mainly because of money at dito pinagkakitaan na. From there,  the quality of our National team faltered except in the 80s when NCC started to fun the National team. 

    Since this is an imported sport we should bring in foreign knowledge to improve our system because the rest of the world has already evolved and several countries have presented challenges against US.
    Exhibit A: ADMU

     Sad to say, dito sa pinas pinipilit pa rin natin un alam natin. Even Chot Reyes isnt a fan of foreign coaches too. Nabuyo nya si mama at nconvince to oust Toroman then decided to form Gilas 2.0 which consists of all PBA players. Funny thing hes a disciple of Dribble drive offense which is an american patented play. Ive read it somewhere na he doesnt wanna pattern his play with the Europeans. As for Guiao, pride yan. ayaw patalo pero lagi namang talo. 
  • Jay P. MercadoJay P. Mercado Moderator PEx Moderator
    JPM, what’s your stand on banning foreigners from getting a coaching job here? I don’t really understand where Guiao is coming from on this issue. We need that transfer of learning too if we are to compete on a global level, right? Masyado ba mawawalan ng opportunities ang homegrown coaches if we get coaches from other countries? Nakakatawa din lang kasi yung loophole na ginagawa silang “consultant” e alam naman natin lahat na it’s a farce. Personally, I’d rather see foreign coaches than imports sa college leagues. 
    I'll share my opinion later. But first, just to clarify certain items that would make this clearer:

    When Ron Jacobs started coaching SMB in 1997, the BCAP filed a motion asking the courts to determine the legality of having a foreign coach handle a PBA team under the premise that unless there's no Filipino who's capable of handling the job, then this should be limited only to Filipino coaches. 

    The court decided in favor of BCAP - hence, there's a law that clearly prohibits foreigners from handling local ballclubs because it encroaches on the job opportunities for a Filipino. That cannot be changed anymore being a law, hence, when you have guys like Bayno, Woolpert, Moran, Toroman, Purves and Dickel being named as head coach, the BCAP would definitely cry foul. And I won't blame them if they do that, because it is part of their mandate to protect the local coaches and assure them of being prioritized over the foreigners. It's the law, as clear as day.

    However, the law doesn't prohibit any foreign coach from handling a national team. Note that the law was made to prioritize job opportunities. But for the national team, which is not being handled by a corporate entity, the BCAP has decided not to question the appointment of any foreigner as head coach. Which is why Toroman and Baldwin were able to handle the national teams in 2009 and 2015, respectively. Even Yeng Guiao has no problem seeing a foreigner handle the national team because of the intricacies of the job. The operative word is "preferred," meaning it would be nicer to have a local coach handle the national team but it's not unlawful. Hence, the BCAP will not be an obstacle to any appointment.

    The reason why Tab isn't the head coach today is because of the relationship problem he encountered with some PBA team owners in the buildup to the 2015 FIBA-Asia tournament. I won't dwell into details but if you have the ROS team owners, Raymond Yu and Terry Que, hesitant to lend their players for the national team despite being perhaps the most generous among all the teams before that, is a testament to the strain in the relationship. And so long as we continue to tap PBA players for the national team, it's virtually impossible for us to borrow players from all the PBA teams. 

    Yeng Guiao became an "ideal" choice because he's the one preferred by all team owners and the Board. He is the only coach perhaps in the league who can get any player he wants from all PBA teams, no matter how many they can be. Which is why the SMC Group suddenly became very receptive to Gilas - lending guys like Junemar, Marcio, Alex, Christian, Paul, Mark, Japeth, Greg, and Stanley (at least, even in practice). Chot didn't have the same luxury, more especially Tab.

    There's no entity or individual that can stop the SBP from appointing Tab or any other foreign coach to handle the national team. And no one will, not even the BCAP. But if the SBP decides on Tab, and still relies on the PBA for the composition of the team, forget about having the SMC and ROS guys there. So it's a flux scenario, really. Yeng may not exactly qualify as the best coach to handle our national team but he's the only one who can marshal the best players available.

    Ditto with college teams. That's a job normally reserved for local coaches because the law states that so long as there's a local coach qualified to handle the job, then foreigners will not be allowed. And we have a bevy of local coaches around. Are they as good as the foreigners? I think we all know the answer there.

    Which is why the BCAP is NOT questioning the presence of Tab or Byrd handling ADMU and DLSU. They're called consultants, but clearly, we know their function is really as head coach. But since they are called consultants, then the position of coach is available for the locals. So no job taken away from them. Even if it means they're just there as figureheads or paper coaches. Ditto with Dickel at TNT.

    I have nothing against the BCAP if they harp up the law everytime a foreign mentor is appointed to be head coach. That's their job, the reason for their existence. But teams have already found ways to circumvent this by naming the foreigners as consultants instead, while still being the ones in charge of running the team. And it's not like the BCAP is ignorant of this reality. Which is why they have no problem having Tab as consultant, so long as Sandy Arespacochaga is head coach, or Byrd as consultant, so long as Gian Nazario is their head coach. They have no problem having Dickel as consultant, so long as Ravena keeps his head coaching job at TNT. They have no problem with Toroman as consultant, so long as Bong Ramos is secured with his job as head coach. No local coach is displaced in the process. The only question is if the local coach is willing to be just a figurehead. Apparently, there seems to be a lot willing to take such position.

    The reason for the laxity of the BCAP with regard to foreign consultants is because of the said "transfer of technology." The BCAP has accepted the fact that foreign consultants can bring a lot when it comes to the infusion of new ideas, innovations - transfer of technology as they say. So long as these consultants get to teach our local coaches with the advancement in coaching, then they're all for it. In other words, the BCAP isn't exactly that "selfish" as what many perceive of them to be. They're just protective of the local coaches and they make sure that the law is applied. 

    As for my opinion, the Damocles' sword is the law. My opinion is that the law is wrong, but who am I to question that? That's for the judge to decide and he has already made a stand on this. Unless someone can raise this issue to the Supreme Court and ask the highest court in the land to reverse this (which is unlikely), then the law sticks - no matter our contrary views to such. For this instance, I don't blame Messrs. Guiao, Chua or Narvasa for constantly questioning the appointment of foreign coaches as head coaches. They don't question them to be consultants anyway - and a couple of teams have already gone through that loophole, so it's not a problem. Neither are they questioning the appointment of a foreign coach for the national team - so the SBP is free to name Tab or any other foreign coach as head coach of Gilas without going through a legal roadblock.

    Given the scenario therefore, and knowing how important it is for us to have someone like Tab running the national team program, then I will go back to what I've been harping for more than 17 years already in online sports forums like PEx and MYPBA - bring back the NCC / Gilas 1.0 program. If we name Tab as head coach and still rely on the PBA, don't expect the best PBA players in the roster. Let Tab handle a new team featuring all amateurs - our collegiate standouts, Fil-Foreigners, a naturalized player, maybe Jordan Clarkson if he's allowed to suit up as a local, and if needed, a sprinkling of PBA players to fill up the weak points of the team. It's the only proper direction to go....

     
  • PlankingDonutPlankingDonut Member PEx Rookie ⭐
    Parang Ganito mangyyari Sir JAy P,

    Let tab handle the NT basta wag ppakialaman un PBA. If thats the case then we should start forming, the younger, the better. parang NCC/ Gilas 1.0 nga. However if we pick college boys, mkkalaban mo dyan UAAP n NCAA. Klangan pa dyan pondohan mo pa. 

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