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AFP modernization: Alternative source of information

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  • l0o00o1 wrote: »
    Do we have any contingency plan in case there is an external threat against our country?

    Yes there is.

    If "Operation Plan (OPLAN): Bantay Laya" is the AFP's game plan for dealing with local rebels, there is a corresponding OPLAN for external threats. Understandably details of the plan are not for open discussion.

    The AFP, particularly the Deputy Chief of Staff for Plans (J5), isn't just sitting on its hands. They are responsible for taking stock of where the AFP is today, and identifying what capabilities the AFP must acquire to meet mission requirements.

    The J5 actually sits on the AFP Weapons Systems Board (AFPWSB) which is responsible for evaluating the requirements -- the shopping list -- that make up the equipment-related portion of the AFP modernization program.

    More about the AFPWSB here.
  • I never said I was an expert. You did.

    I do not have a pretentious mind either. You do not know my level in the US military, but my clearance is higher than any uniformed individual. More often than not, I outclear the O3s that pilot the warbird, so he does not have to check clearances when we talk. Talking is done very freely. It's when things are written when they get hazy.

    I was interviewing a resigning O3 (he was on terminal leave) once in my office and we were talking about warbirds in a sub-theater. The discussion became so involved and I drew a sketch of the plan F in Afghanistan. Plan F is when Allied troops would reach 60,000 or higher. I knew the exact number in the theater specs, he did not. I was drawing warbird here, warbird there ... I knew the number of warbirds was nowhere near than I drew.

    He was so impressed by the real-time report of the war where the troops would be updated on progress on their laptop. The warbirds would keep track of the radios and laptops that went into the field of war and the warbirds issued a report to control on the location of each laptop. He left with my sketch. I said, sure, there's nothing classified on it. If there's any problem, I would give you a call.

    Later I went into a staff meeting. They said Afghanistan had a budget problem and they were cutting down on the number of warbirds. You see, Afghanistan is mountainous terrain and the warbirds are satellites that provide a communications trunk line to link every unit that has a radio or a computer or both. The budget cut the number of satellites such that the sketch I gave the O3 I interviewed earlier is now classified. I excused myself from the meeting to call the O3 applicant: mark that sketch CDP-HAS (Classification Determination Pending - Handle As Secret) top and bottom. Of course, it would need a cover sheet and a back sheet, and stored in an approved container ... or he can give it back to me. It came back to me later that day and the sketch was destroyed by a shredder that crosscuts into thousands of pieces.

    I can assure you that nothing I say here is classified. It's just like filming on an aircraft carrier. Cameras are pointed at the airplanes taking off or landing down. The missions are classified, but the planes are not.
    :naughty:
    Partly true, mostly assumptions of someone comparing the AFP (and PNP) to that of the US'. So those made you an "expert" of Philippine military and police now, huh?

    Insurgency is an internal problem, yes, but the PNP is yet to fully achieve its counter insurgency capability. Those sweeping statements like " actually, the AFP is worthless" and " I would recommend standing down the AFP and the Defense statement" are nothing more than a product of a pretentious mind.

    If you are in a "level" inside the US military just like what you are babbling, you wouldn't even dare talk about it with you boyfriend, much less in the net. So stop the BS.
  • I do not have a pretentious mind either.

    Sure. :rotflmao:

    So high up in the chain that you feel obligated to post your resume on a thread that doesn't need it. :naughty:

    Moving on.
  • What resume? That was a story about an O3 I interviewed (he got the job, by the way. But no, he got another assignment under another system engineer). That's something you would not post on a resume. It's something out of a day of a military engineer.

    I was not high up on the chain of command. If the commander of LA AFB (a 2-star rank, O8) is at 5 and a janitor is at 1, I would rate a 3.5 or 3.6 The officer types I would normally interface with (like have coffee in the afternoon with) would be O4 and O5. But I got called into the O8's office twice, both after missile launches from US Navy submarines indicated weird trajectories of the missiles (they would self-destruct if they do not fly like a missile). My message to him was the same: hey, they were tests that we knew were happening in 2 hours, tops, enough to alert Haleakala. (The US Navy does not give the precise locations of active submarines in advance, even to the USAF. But the eye we had in Maui saw the launch, or maybe it was the self-destruction. It saw a very hot boom at the curvature of the earth!)
    :naughty:
    Adroth wrote: »
    Sure. :rotflmao:

    So high up in the chain that you feel obligated to post your resume on a thread that doesn't need it. :naughty:

    Moving on.
  • What resume?:naughty:

    LOL. :rotflmao:

    Sorry no openings for make believe job experience. :naughty:
  • Back to the main subject.

    Summary of the Capability Upgrade Program, as posted in the 2007 Modernization Report

    F. AFP Multi-Year Capability Upgrade Plan

    Consistent with MYCaPS principles, Secretary Cruz directed the development of a 6-Year AFP CUP to form part of an 18-year capability planning horizon. For the first 6 years, the AFP CUP will focus on enhanced capabilities in the conduct of ISO (Internal Security Operations); the second 6 years will serve as a transition phase from ISO capability buildup to territorial defense; and the third 6 years will focus on territorial defense and peacekeeping operations (PKO), thus completing the 18-year horizon.

    1. First 6 Years: Back to basics

    For the first 6 years, the defense and military establishment shall invest at least P5 Billion each year or a total of at least P30 Billion for the entire 6-year period. The release of P10 Billion for 2006 has been approved by the President. The first 6-year AFP CUP focuses defense spending and identifies the needed resources to upgrade AFP ISO capabilities on critical areas such as mobility, firepower, communications, command and control, force protection and combat life support for individuals and units. Programmed for acquisition are basic equipment in support of ISO such as helicopters, trucks, patrol boats, rifles and radios. These equipment are prioritized into blocks costing an aggregate of P5 Billion each. The grouping of equipment into blocks is meant to enhance the absorptive capacity of the AFP and benefit from the enhanced revenue stream of the National Government. This also allows efficiency in implementation and frees the program from being unnecessarily time-bound. With an upgraded operational capability for ISO, the AFP will be in a better position to resolve internal security threats in the near term. The resolution of internal security threats is envisioned to enhance economic growth that will render possible the provision of resources needed for the AFP to embark on a real modernization program.

    Procurement of these equipment have also been programmed to address the entire requirement of the AFP in order to simplify the procurement processes, ensure interoperability and take advantage of economies of scale. Each procurement shall also include an Integrated Logistics System (ILS) to address the added cost of maintaining these new equipment in the absence of additional funding under the annual AFP budget for maintenance, operations and other expenses (MOOE).

    As previously stated, the central component of the first 6-year AFP CUP is the Battalion Upgrade Program, which will enable the AFP to effectively execute its plans and
    accomplish its goal.

    In the TO&E for these battalions, MEE have been identified, including those for force protection, combat life-saving and night-fighting, and are programmed to Philippine Defense Reform be acquired in time for the battalions’ respective retraining.

    For service support units, the DND has decided to focus its initial efforts on ammunition supply of the AFP. In this task, the DND has already completed the assessment of the Government Arsenal (GA) ammunition depot and ammunition management. The assessment report indicated that the AFP ammunition requirements could not be met with the existing arsenal. Recommendations based on the assessment include augmentation of the GA budget and the procurement of new equipment to fulfill the AFP’s requirements.

    2. Second 6 Years: Transition from basic capabilities to first-level modernization

    Premised on a significant improvement in the economy as a consequence of an improved security environment, the DND will invest P10 Billion each year for a total of P60 Billion for the second 6-year period to complete the basic capability upgrade and proceed with the first-level modernization geared towards meeting basic requirements to address external security threats focused on the needs of the Philippine Air Force (PAF) and the Philippine Navy (PN).

    3. Third 6 Years: Beginning of real modernization

    For the third and last 6-year period, the projections for much improved economic conditions will allow for an increase in defense investment of up to P20 Billion per year or a total of P120 Billion, which will usher the real modernization of the AFP and complete the 18-year capability planning horizon.
  • Kailan makakabili o gagawa ng bagong jet fighters ang Pinas? May plano ba? O pagputi na ng uwak tayo makakabili?
  • l0o00o1 wrote: »
    Kailan makakabili o gagawa ng bagong jet fighters ang Pinas?

    It's easier to buy aircraft than to develop them. Development costs millions, and will take years. Check out this discussion:

    From India: Pitfalls of building your own aircraft

    Very few countries actually develop their own, and amongst those that do . . . quite a number have actually stopped simply because it is a very expensive endeavor to sustain.

    Indonesia's national aerospace company, for example, filed for bankruptcy a few years ago because it was in the red. Indonesian courts, however, rejected the bankruptcy request.

    You'll get more bang for your buck by buying existing platforms. This is actually the route chosen by most of our potential adversaries.
    May plano ba?

    Definitely.

    Fighter aircraft aren't due till after Phase 1 of the CUP. See the post above yours.

    The PAF's responsibility in the CUP is contained in its "Horizon" programs. See here for details.

    At this point, the PAF is working to expand its pilot training facilities at the PAF Flying School to accommodate the anticipated demand for pilots to man these aircraft, as make up for pilots that leave the PAF to work for the airlines and other civilian flying opportunities. See here.

    It is also working on rehabilitating its aircraft detection capability, which deteriorated considerably since we kicked the US out of their bases in Clark and Subic. Remember, you need to be able to detect incoming aircraft before you can launch aircraft to intercept them.

    At the moment, the PAF is making up for gaps in its detection coverage by working working with the Air Transportation Office in what's been called the "One Sky" policy. Since 2000, the PAF Air Defense Center has had access to data from civilian Primary Search Radars (PSR) at civilian airports. See here for details.
  • Aircraft is aircraft, yes? Wrong!

    What kinds of planes and helos will work for Pinas? Actually, helos will be of more actual benefit right now than fixed wing birds. But superiority by air will never be achieved by helos. If there is a conflict between helos and jet aircraft, the jets will always win.

    But conflict is not determined by what you have. The outcome of the conflict is. But get this: the ability to enter conflict is a function of what you do not have. Am I speaking in code? Nope. The ability to enter conflict is to get whatever it is that you would like to get. More land. More people. More power. And of course, more money.

    Will Pinas need more land? Maybe. But there is more land internally to Pinas. It just needs to adjust its outlook internally, like inner to the islands, not more islands.

    Will Pinas produce more people? Actually, people production is still very intense in groups 4 and 5. Unfortunately, those are also the poor people being produced.

    Will Pinas use more power? Maybe energy, clean power, the ability to do work. But political power? This kind of power is very fleeting in Pinas. The kind that corrupts absolutely.

    Will Pinas produce more money? Production of goods and services is measured in terms of money. Pinas is producing now and will produce more in the future.

    The answer is not a more efficient AFP. In fact, the AFP saps whatever the on-going strength of the Pinas peso is. The money that is used to buy things for the AFP is sent overseas for equipment that is not produced in Pinas. The net effect is that the money is used to strengthen countries like Malaysia. Pinas will remain poor, if not poorer, while it upgrades its AFP with weapons it will use against its own people whose money the AFP uses to buy.
    :naughty:
    Adroth wrote: »
    It's easier to buy aircraft than to develop them. Development costs millions, and will take years. Check out this discussion:

    From India: Pitfalls of building your own aircraft

    Very few countries actually develop their own, and amongst those that do . . . quite a number have actually stopped simply because it is a very expensive endeavor to sustain.

    Indonesia's national aerospace company, for example, filed for bankruptcy a few years ago because it was in the red. Indonesian courts, however, rejected the bankruptcy request.

    You'll get more bang for your buck by buying existing platforms. This is actually the route chosen by most of our potential adversaries.



    Definitely.

    Fighter aircraft aren't due till after Phase 1 of the CUP. See the post above yours.

    The PAF's responsibility in the CUP is contained in its "Horizon" programs. See here for details.

    At this point, the PAF is working to expand its pilot training facilities at the PAF Flying School to accommodate the anticipated demand for pilots to man these aircraft, as make up for pilots that leave the PAF to work for the airlines and other civilian flying opportunities. See here.

    It is also working on rehabilitating its aircraft detection capability, which deteriorated considerably since we kicked the US out of their bases in Clark and Subic. Remember, you need to be able to detect incoming aircraft before you can launch aircraft to intercept them.

    At the moment, the PAF is making up for gaps in its detection coverage by working working with the Air Transportation Office in what's been called the "One Sky" policy. Since 2000, the PAF Air Defense Center has had access to data from civilian Primary Search Radars (PSR) at civilian airports. See here for details.
  • blue_tracerblue_tracer PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    hhmm.. so malabo na pala talaga chance na mag develop ng sariling aircraft ang pinas. :( not even in the next 3 decades (?)

    ano ba possibleng fighter jets/air interdiction na affordable sa phil. air force para sa future external defense nito, F16 C/D ba..? or MIG29? Israeli Kfir..? teka may Kfir's pa ba ngayon..? :lol: huwag naman sana 2nd hand na F5's.. :(

    thanks kung sino man ang may updates.. :)
  • In fact, the AFP saps whatever the on-going strength of the Pinas peso is.

    An investment in the AFP is an investment in security . . . which is a precondition to progress.

    Therefore an investment in the AFP is an investment in the future.
    while it upgrades its AFP with weapons it will use against its own people whose money the AFP uses to buy.

    Modernization puts the AFP in a position to face external threats. It allows the AFP to move away from a predominantly ISO focus to that of a more conventional stance.

    Note, external threat also includes those who would use resources within our EEZ for non-Filipino benefit.
    The money that is used to buy things for the AFP is sent overseas for equipment that is not produced in Pinas.

    Again . . . you speak in absolute terms . . . which make your pronouncements more wrong than right.

    The AFP's priority is to acquire whatever capabilities it can in the soonest possible time. Given a choice between using imported technology that is available now, or waiting for indigenous solutions to mature . . . naturally they will go with what is already available.

    HOWEVER, purchasing items from foreign suppliers does not automatically mean that it is a disadvantage for local industry. The key mitigating factor is in the mode of payment. This is where COUNTERTRADE comes into play. With countertrade, vendors are paid in kind not money. Government money is used to buy local products which are then used to pay the vendor.

    The lead agency for countertrade transactions is the Philippine Investment & Trading Corp. (PITC). Based on PITC statistics, the AFP is the largest user of countertrade transactions. The following modernization items were paid for using countertrade:

    -> SIAI-Marchetti S211 trainer jets (Italy): 40% of the amount was paid for with the following items: Crude Coconut Oil, Garments/Fabric, various Copra products, various Porcelain, Black Tiger Prawns, Activated Coco Carbon, various Handicraft

    -> Squad Automatic Weapons (Belgium): 85% of the acquisition was paid for with semi-processed rubber

    -> Harris communication equipment (USA): 100% paid for with semi-processed rubber products, dessicated coconut, various handicraft

    -> 105mm howizter upgrade (France): 100% paid for with copra products, desiccated Coconut, canned Tuna, assorted handicrafts

    ==== ~~~ ====

    The modernization program is actually a lucrative opportunity for local business and industry. Philippine laws that govern AFP procurement give Philippine companies significant advantages should they choose to participate in competitive bidding for various items. Consider the following laws:

    -> Republic Act 5183. This nameless law, passed in 1967, requires the government to buy goods only from Philippine companies. On the plus side, it gives entrepreneurs who have the intestinal fortitude to compete for the AFP's business an opportunity to see their products adopted. On the down side, it institutionalizes the "middle-man industry" that simply imports equipment that it then sells the government.

    -> Republic Act 9184 (Government Procurement Act of 2003). This law forces the AFP acquire equipment through competitive bidding. When applied in conjunction with RA 5183, AFP spending actually provides Philippine business with a lucrative market that it can satisfy.

    The acquisition of watercraft from a Cebu-based shipyard is proof that these two laws can work to the advantage of Philippine business.

    ==== ~~~ ====

    The AFP actually allocates funds for the development of local defense industry. This is called the Self-Reliant Defense Posture (SRDP) program, which actually has a budget that is separate and distinct from the modernization budget. All services are pursuing their respective SRDP programs, ranging from manufacture of specific parts (e.g., plexiglass wind screens for helicopters) to specific weapon systems. The Army's Armored Escort Vehicle (AEV) falls in this category.

    One area where the AFP Modernization Program and the SRDP Program intersect is with regard to ammunition manufacture. The Government Arsenal, and entity within the DND, has the mandate to satisfy the ammunition requirements of both the AFP and the PNP. However, a capability assessment of the arsenal revealed that it simply cannot keep up with the demand -- especially when major operations like those conducted against the MILF break out. Part of the modernization program is aimed at upgrading the facilities of the arsenal to increase its output, thereby reducing the need to import ammunition.
  • Now that you have bit the line, let's see how you will wiggle out of the sinker.

    External threat. Name 3 external threats to Pinas. Indonesia? Malaysia? Will they wave the Sword of Muhammad against Pinas? Or will it be Vietnam? Those are the three closest threats. What about China? Is China a threat? Or is it Singapore?

    How will Pinas face such external threats? Vietnam has no standing army trained to fight. It's busy protecting it's shores from Pinoys who want to work there. Malaysia too, it's busy deporting Pinoys out of Sabah. Malaysia is using police against Pinoys, not it's army.

    It's got to be Indonesia. After all, Indonesians look like Pinoys, only they have more money. What do you think the American soldiers in Southern Pinas are saying to their commanders? I know. Because I was at a meeting in Hawaii and the US Marines who rotated out of Pinas were very specific in saying they can afford to pay Pinays to keep house for them, wash their uniforms and cook dinners for as low as $20 a month, if the command will let them. What was their basis in saying that? The Pinoy E4 and higher soldiers are packed with a woman and children each (they have a wife somewhere else) all doing chores for a song.
    :naughty:
    Adroth wrote: »
    An investment in the AFP is an investment in security . . . which is a precondition to progress.

    Therefore an investment in the AFP is an investment in the future.



    Modernization puts the AFP in a position to face external threats. It allows the AFP to move away from a predominantly ISO focus to that of a more conventional stance.

    Note, external threat also includes those who would use resources within our EEZ for non-Filipino benefit.



    Again . . . you speak in absolute terms . . . which make your pronouncements more wrong than right.

    The AFP's priority is to acquire whatever capabilities it can in the soonest possible time. Given a choice between using imported technology that is available now, or waiting for indigenous solutions to mature . . . naturally they will go with what is already available.

    HOWEVER, purchasing items from foreign suppliers does not automatically mean that it is a disadvantage for local industry. The key mitigating factor is in the mode of payment. This is where COUNTERTRADE comes into play. With countertrade, vendors are paid in kind not money. Government money is used to buy local products which are then used to pay the vendor.

    The lead agency for countertrade transactions is the Philippine Investment & Trading Corp. (PITC). Based on PITC statistics, the AFP is the largest user of countertrade transactions. The following modernization items were paid for using countertrade:

    -> SIAI-Marchetti S211 trainer jets (Italy): 40% of the amount was paid for by the following items: Crude Coconut Oil, Garments/Fabric, various Copra products, various Porcelain, Black Tiger Prawns, Activated Coco Carbon, various Handicraft

    -> Squad Automatic Weapons (Belgium): 85% of the acquisition was paid for with semi-processed rubber

    -> Harris communication equipment (USA): 100% paid for with semi-processed rubber products, dessicated coconut, various handicraft

    -> 105mm howizter upgrade (France): 100% paid for with copra products, desiccated Coconut, canned Tuna, assorted handicrafts

    The modernization program is actually a lucrative opportunity for local business and industry. Philippine laws that govern AFP procurement give Philippine companies significant advantages should they choose to participate in competitive bidding for various items. Consider the following laws:

    -> Republic Act 5183. This nameless law, passed in 1967, requires the government to buy goods only from Philippine companies. On the plus side, it gives entrepreneurs who have the intestinal fortitude to compete for the AFP's business an opportunity to see their products adopted. On the down side, it institutionalizes the "middle-man industry" that simply imports equipment that it then sells the government.

    -> Republic Act 9184 (Government Procurement Act of 2003). This law forces the AFP acquire equipment through competitive bidding. When applied in conjunction with RA 5183, AFP spending actually provides Philippine business with a lucrative market that it can satisfy.

    The acquisition of watercraft from a Cebu-based shipyard is proof that these two laws can work to the advantage of Philippine business.

    The AFP actually allocates funds for the development of local defense industry. This is called the Self-Reliant Defense Posture (SRDP) program, which actually has a budget that is separate and distinct from the modernization budget. All services are pursuing their respective SRDP program, ranging from in-house manufacture of specific parts (e.g., plexiglass wind screens for helicopters) to specific weapon systems.

    One area where the AFP Modernization Program and the SRDP Program intersect is with regard to ammunition manufacture. The Government Arsenal, and entity within the DND, has the mandate to satisfy the ammunition requirements of both the AFP and the PNP. However, a capability assessment of the arsenal revealed that it simply cannot keep up with the demand -- especially when major operations like those conducted against the MILF break out. Part of the modernization program is aimed at upgrading the facilities of the arsenal to increase its output, thereby reducing the need to import ammunition.
  • Now that you have bit the line, let's see how you will wiggle out of the sinker.

    External threat. Name 3 external threats to Pinas.

    LOL. Easy.

    1. Chinese poachers

    2. Taiwanese fishermen

    3. Japanese factory ships

    If you actually took the time to read what I posted . . . you'll notice the built-in wiggle space, namely the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ).

    Predictable Alan . . . so pathetically predictable. :rotflmao:

    The AFP's long standing focus on Internal Security Operations (ISO) meant that most of its resources have been allocated to its land forces.

    The PAF and PN have been so neglected, that personnel from both services jokingly refer to the AFP as the "Army Forces of the Philippines".

    These two services are responsible for patroling our maritime borders and the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), which is approximately 1.6 million square kilometers.

    This is why the acquisition of additional patrol ships and Maritime Patrol Aircraft (MPA) are key components of the 2nd and 3rd phases of the CUP.

    === ~~~ ===

    Another modernization project for the Philippine Navy with an outward facing impact is the Multi-Purpose Vessel (MPV) project. The design being considered for this vessel is patterned after a Landing Ship Dock (LSD), like the Singaporean Endurance class. One of the missions reportedly envisioned for this vessel is large-scale evacuation of OFWs from war zones, like what happened in Lebanon not too long ago.

    If its not deployed overseas for OFW egress, it is meant serve as floating hospital for disaster relief, as well as troop movements.
  • You are right. LOL! Now, let's see what has been on the acquisition list for these threats, huh?

    For one thing, the Japanese factory ships are not alone. They have to contend with Korean factory ships. Taiwanese fishermen are just that. They catch fish. So, the only thing is Chinese poachers.

    And you are saying the AFP needs to catch these people? What will the AFP feed them with after they catch them? (Will Pinas feed them with whatever they caught?)

    Why hasn't Pinas declared war against Japan and China (OK, Taiwan is independent of Japan and China)? Is it because Pinas is still upgrading its AFP fighting capability?
    :naughty:
    Adroth wrote: »
    LOL. Easy.

    1. Chinese poachers

    2. Taiwanese fishermen

    3. Japanese factory ships

    If you actually took the time to read what I posted . . . you'll notice the built-in wiggle space, namely the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ).

    Predictable Alan . . . so pathetically predictable. :rotflmao:

    The AFP's long standing focus on Internal Security Operations (ISO) meant that most of its resources have been allocated to the land forces.

    The PAF and PN have been so neglected, that personnel from both services jokingly refer to the AFP as the "Army Forces of the Philippines".

    These two services are responsible for patroling our maritime borders and the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). The Philippine EEZ is approximately 1.6 million square kilometers.

    This is why the acquisition of additional patrol ships and Maritime Patrol Aircraft (MPA) are key components of the 2nd and 3rd phases of the CUP.

    === ~~~ ===

    Another modernization project for the Philippine Navy with an outward facing impact is the Multi-Purpose Vessel (MPV) project. The design being considered for this vessel is pattern after a Landing Ship Dock (LSD), like the Singaporean Endurance class. One of the missions reportedly envisioned for this vessel is large-scale evacuation of OFWs from war zones, like what happened in Lebanon not too long ago.

    If its not deployed overseas for OFW egress, it is meant serve as floating hospital for disaster relief, as well as troop movements.
  • Adroth wrote: »
    It's easier to buy aircraft than to develop them. Development costs millions, and will take years. Check out this discussion:

    From India: Pitfalls of building your own aircraft

    Thanks for the URL link. Although it may not be the right time yet to build and create our own aircraft, I still think we should try. As the saying goes, "it is better to try and fail than not try at all".
  • Adroth wrote: »
    LOL. Easy.

    1. Chinese poachers

    2. Taiwanese fishermen

    3. Japanese factory ships

    If you actually took the time to read what I posted . . . you'll notice the built-in wiggle space, namely the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ).

    Also include:

    4. Foreign ships dumping toxic waste to our seas.


    We really need to detect and apprehend these bastards, or else we will suffer.
  • l0o00o1 wrote: »
    Thanks for the URL link. Although it may not be the right time yet to build and create our own aircraft, I still think we should try. As the saying goes, "it is better to try and fail than not try at all".

    We already did try.

    Have you heard of the Defiant?
    l0o00o1 wrote: »
    Also include:

    4. Foreign ships dumping toxic waste to our seas.


    We really need to detect and apprehend these bastards, or else we will suffer.

    Agreed. *okay*
  • You are right. LOL! Now, let's see what has been on the acquisition list for these threats, huh?

    Acquisitions that address these threats are part of Phases 2 & 3 of the CUP. We are still in Phase 1.

    The public will know what these acquisitions are once the plans, that have already been laid out, are turned into invitations to bid.
    And you are saying the AFP needs to catch these people?

    If they are poaching or fishing/operating illegally within our EEZ, then yes.
    What will the AFP feed them with after they catch them? (Will Pinas feed them with whatever they caught?)

    That is a problem for your beloved DILG-PNP. :naughty:
  • paenggoypaenggoy PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    But your fourth-to-the-last paragraph disproves your last paragraph. Also, you did not address any of the important points I raised earlier. For example, you claimed earlier that the allowances are being used for other things. Has any formal investigation been made about this? And how many soldiers were caught and arrested? In another message, you argue that soldiers don't know how to use their wages correctly. Is there any evidence such as a study to prove that? And there are more questions, especially about pay, the living conditions and the quality of food given to soldiers, and so on.

    Given all that, the only "ancient" thing about the article that I linked to are the problems that they raise. And they are "ancient" not only because they have been taking place for a long time but because they have not been resolved. The last few paragraphs of your message below confirm that!
    Adroth wrote: »
    When a person is more focused on finding fault . . . than trying to really understand . . . then you end up getting as confused as you are now.



    Both . . . as I've been telling you for the fourth time now. Take the time to really read my previous posts.

    When a person is more focused on making a point than in communicating . . . no learning can happen.



    What makes you think this doesn't happen?



    Think about it. Where there are more eyes watching . .. there will be inherently more control and oversight. When you are in the field, there are fewer eyes.

    Fewer eyes does not mean there is completely no oversight or control. It simply means that checks and counter-checks are fewer.



    The fact that AFP press officers openly discuss this problem indicates that it has been studied and acknowledged.

    Seriously . . . what large organization does not suffer from pilferage? This is a problem in both private industry as well as the government.

    Would you really need a study to determine if people are surfing for personal purposes at work. ;)



    You seem to have forgotten your own comment, shown below:

    “As for reserves, I think there is none for several, including members of ROTC and para-military. “

    You made the assertion that reservists didn't get equipment. So I provided information that showed that you were wrong.



    The reason it is ancient is because lots of progress has been made since January 2007. To dwell on that article without taking stock of what reformers in the AFP have already been done is a both a dis-service to these patriots and is inherently inaccurate.



    “Basics” in the context of the CUP refers to equipment that give soldiers the means to move, shoot, and communicate. This includes not only the tools and equipment themselves, but also include the logistical chain and its related controls.

    There is no contradiction between the term “basics” and what you describe as “major issues” because the basics form the foundation for the remainder of the modernization program. The genius of the current three-phase CUP is that highlights the importance of the basics. Unless these basic matters are addressed . . . modernization cannot move forward.

    Unless these issues are indeed resolved . . . we will remain in Phase 1 until they are.



    The new acts, processes, and the like, are all taking place specifically to address the issues raised in the article.

    The article is ancient . . . because changes have already begun, and progress has already been made.
  • OK. Phase 1, 2 and 3. Pinas is in Phase 1. So, then, you would let the number 1, 2 and 3 problems run rampant? Oh, I forgot, they have to be illegally fishing inside the Pinas EEZ. You know what? They have been doing that for tens of years now, since the Spaniards were the bosses. But wait! Wait until Pinas gets it's naval war machines in phase 3, then we'll get em, eh? That's BS!
    :naughty:
    Adroth wrote: »
    Acquisitions that address these threats are part of Phases 2 & 3 of the CUP. We are still in Phase 1.

    The public will know what these acquisitions are once the plans, that have already been laid out, are turned into invitations to bid.



    If they are poaching or fishing/operating illegally within our EEZ, then yes.



    That is a problem for your beloved DILG-PNP. :naughty:
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