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The Invisible Man (2020)

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TERRIFYING TALE OF OBSESSION UNRAVELS IN “THE INVISIBLE MAN” TRAILER
 

What you can’t see can hurt you. Emmy winner Elisabeth Moss (Us, Hulu’s The Handmaid’s Tale) stars in The Invisible Man, a terrifying modern tale of obsession inspired by Universal’s classic monster character.

Check out the film’s official trailer below and watch The Invisible Man in Philippine cinemas this February 2020.



Trapped in a violent, controlling relationship with a wealthy and brilliant scientist, Cecilia Kass (Moss) escapes in the dead of night and disappears into hiding, aided by her sister (Harriet Dyer, NBC’s The InBetween), their childhood friend (Aldis Hodge, Straight Outta Compton) and his teenage daughter (Storm Reid, HBO’s Euphoria).

But when Cecilia’s abusive ex (Oliver Jackson-Cohen, Netflix’s The Haunting of Hill House) commits suicide and leaves her a generous portion of his vast fortune, Cecilia suspects his death was a hoax. As a series of eerie coincidences turns lethal, threatening the lives of those she loves, Cecilia’s sanity begins to unravel as she desperately tries to prove that she is being hunted by someone nobody can see.

Jason Blum, our current-day master of the horror genre, produces The Invisible Man for his Blumhouse Productions. The Invisible Man is written, directed and executive produced by Leigh Whannell, one of the original conceivers of the Saw franchise who most recently directed Upgrade and Insidious: Chapter 3.

The film is also produced by Kylie du Fresne (Upgrade, The Sapphires) for Goalpost Pictures. The executive producers are Whannell, Beatriz Sequeira, Charles Layton, Rosemary Blight, Ben Grant, Couper Samuelson and Jeanette Volturno. The Invisible Man is a co-production of Goalpost Pictures Australia and Blumhouse Productions, in association with Nervous Tick, for Universal Pictures.

The Invisible Man is distributed in the Philippines by United International Pictures through Columbia Pictures.  Follow us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/uipmoviesph/ ; Twitter at https://twitter.com/uipmoviesph and Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/uipmoviesph/

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  • forgforg Administrator PEx Moderator
    HORROR THRILLER “THE INVISIBLE MAN  SCARE WITH NEW POSTER


  • forgforg Administrator PEx Moderator

    “THE INVISIBLE MAN” UNVEILS BRAND NEW POSTER & SPOT

     

    Universal Pictures and Blumhouse Productions have just revealed the brand new poster and TV spot for the suspense thriller The Invisible Man, a terrifying modern tale of obsession inspired by Universal’s classic monster character.

    Check out the one-sheet & spot below and watch The Invisible Man in Philippine cinemas  February 26.




    Trapped in a violent, controlling relationship with a wealthy and brilliant scientist, Cecilia Kass (Elisabeth Moss, The Handmaid’d Tale, Us) escapes in the dead of night and disappears into hiding, aided by her sister (Harriet Dyer, NBC’s The InBetween), their childhood friend (Aldis Hodge, Straight Outta Compton) and his teenage daughter (Storm Reid, HBO’s Euphoria).

    But when Cecilia’s abusive ex (Oliver Jackson-Cohen, Netflix’s The Haunting of Hill House) commits suicide and leaves her a generous portion of his vast fortune, Cecilia suspects his death was a hoax. As a series of eerie coincidences turns lethal, threatening the lives of those she loves, Cecilia’s sanity begins to unravel as she desperately tries to prove that she is being hunted by someone nobody can see.

    Jason Blum, our current-day master of the horror genre, produces The Invisible Man for his Blumhouse Productions. The Invisible Man is written, directed and executive produced by Leigh Whannell, one of the original conceivers of the Saw franchise who most recently directed Upgrade and Insidious: Chapter 3.

    The Invisible Man is distributed in the Philippines by United International Pictures through Columbia Pictures.  Follow us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/uipmoviesph/ ; Twitter at https://twitter.com/uipmoviesph and Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/uipmoviesph/. Connect with #TheInvisibleMan and tag uipmoviesph

  • forgforg Administrator PEx Moderator

    “THE INVISIBLE MAN” BEGINS NEW ERA OF MONSTERS FROM UNIVERSAL PICTURES

     




    The character of the Invisible Man is part of Universal Pictures’ family of classic movie Monsters—including legendary figures Dracula, The Wolf Man, Frankenstein’s Monster, The Bride of Frankenstein and The Creature from the Black Lagoon. Part of the reason these infamous characters have endured is because they are timeless and represent a wide range of cultural fears and anxieties—the intersection of scientific discovery and timeless love and loss. They’re adaptable to whatever time we’re living in.

    The upcoming horror thriller The Invisible Man from writer/director Leigh Whannell and starring Elisabeth Moss represents a fresh, new direction for how to celebrate these classic characters. This new direction is filmmaker driven, inviting innovative storytellers with original, bold ideas for these characters to develop the stories and pitch them. 

    This film is an example of how that process worked.  Whannell had an exciting, new and terrifying idea for this character, and the studio was thrilled to work with him on this new vision. Going forward, Universal Monster films will be rooted in the horror genre, with no restrictions on budget, rating or genre. They won’t be a part of a shared interconnected universe, but instead will each stand on their own.

    The first chapter is shepherded by blockbuster producer Jason Blum of Blumhouse Productions. “We’re the first of a new generation of Universal Monster movies,” Blum says. “Universal is working on a handful of them, but ours is the first. So, that’s nerve-wracking but also a lot of fun.”

    The producer of all the films in Universal’s juggernaut The Purge franchise—as well as the studio’s blockbusters from Split to Get Out — explains that the Monsters stay close to him. “Our company’s been based at the studio for a long time,” Blum says. “Universal has a huge history in horror through the Monster movies of the ʼ30s and ʼ40s. That lore looms large at the studio. I had a meeting with Chairman Donna Langley, and she wanted to reinvigorate the muscle that was exercised so often by the Monsters. Since we’ve been compared to that era of Universal because we’ve done so much horror with the studio, it seemed like a very natural fit.”

    “Those Monster movies are near and dear to my heart,” Blum continues. “That’s why I wanted to do this. Our concept was to make the stories relevant to today. And that’s just what Leigh has done with The Invisible Man.”

    In Philippine cinemas February 26, The Invisible Man is distributed by United International Pictures through Columbia Pictures.  Follow us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/uipmoviesph/ ; Twitter at https://twitter.com/uipmoviesph and Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/uipmoviesph/. Connect with #TheInvisibleMan and tag uipmoviesph

  • forgforg Administrator PEx Moderator

    “INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 3” DIRECTOR NOW THRILLS WITH “THE INVISIBLE MAN”

     



    When the opportunity to direct The Invisible Man crash-landed into Leigh Whannell’s life, he didn’t know it was a chance to reimagine a new iteration of one of Universal Pictures’ Monsters -- and re-visualize the invisible.


    While H.G. Wells’ original character was a scientist who devolved into madness, Whannell was more interested in the objects of the villain’s obsession. The focus, it occurred to him, should be inverted. “If you were making an Invisible Man movie, you would make it from the point of view of his victim. Say a woman who escapes from her abusive partner in the middle of the night and then finds out that he’s killed himself but doesn’t quite believe it, especially when mysterious things start happening.”

    For the filmmaker, he let his imagination run wild when fleshing out the narrative of one of Universal’s classic Monsters. “I knew what I was dealing with,” Whannell says. “What became the hard part was building an entirely new story around the character and figuring out whose point of view this story was being told from. Any research quickly became a period of my sitting there with a notepad and a pen and trying to invent new ideas. This was an exciting opportunity, as I felt like this was a character that had not been done to death—he doesn’t have too many people’s fingerprints on him.”

    As he crafted a terrifying, modern story of obsession, he imagined the story from the perspective of Cecilia Kass, a smart, capable architect in San Francisco who has become imprisoned by Adrian Griffin, her violent, abusive and powerful boyfriend. When she escapes from the brilliant inventor and optics pioneer, she goes into hiding with the help of her friends and family. But after her ex commits suicide, Cecilia begins to suspect he’s not actually dead but has made himself invisible…using his ground-breaking invention to torture her. The trouble is, her theory sounds insane and paranoid, and she finds herself questioning her own sanity, while also trying to protect herself and the people she loves.

    “I didn’t cycle through 10 different versions of this story,” Whannell says. “It almost appeared fully formed in terms of the journey of a victim being stalked by the Invisible Man. It taught me to not feel the need to spend weeks going around the block searching for something better. With hindsight looking back at the screenplay, I can see a lot of these themes of women being victimized or not being believed—somebody trying to prove that something terrible is happening to them but not being able to convince anybody of it. But I don’t even want to unpack it too much because I think one of the fun parts of moviemaking for me is watching other people interpret it.”

    In Philippine cinemas February 26, The Invisible Man is distributed by United International Pictures through Columbia Pictures.  Follow us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/uipmoviesph/ ; Twitter at https://twitter.com/uipmoviesph and Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/uipmoviesph/. Connect with #TheInvisibleMan and tag uipmoviesph

  • forgforg Administrator PEx Moderator

    BELIEVE THE WOMAN: 

    ELISABETH MOSS FIGHTS TO SURVIVE IN “THE INVISIBLE MAN”

     

    Emmy Award winner Elisabeth Moss (Us, Hulu’s The Handmaid’s Tale) stars in The Invisible Man, a terrifying modern tale of obsession inspired by Universal’s classic Monster character.


    Moss plays Cecilia Kass, a smart, capable architect in San Francisco who has become imprisoned by Adrian Griffin (Oliver Jackson Cohen), her violent, abusive and powerful boyfriend. When she escapes from the brilliant inventor and optics pioneer, she goes into hiding with the help of her friends and family. But after her ex commits suicide, Cecilia begins to suspect he’s not actually dead but has made himself invisible…using his ground-breaking invention to torture her. The trouble is, her theory sounds insane and paranoid, and she finds herself questioning her own sanity, while also trying to protect herself and the people she loves.

    When director-writer Leigh Whannell finished the script, he knew he required an extraordinary actress to pull off Cecilia. “When you have a character falling off a cliff, it’s a dangerous area with acting,” Whannell says. “It’s easy to go over the top or be too histrionic. I needed someone who could play a person losing her mind…but in a grounded way.”

    He found his heroine in Elisabeth Moss, who brought brutal authenticity to her work on Mad Men and, of course, her current role as Offred in The Handmaid’s Tale. “I knew that she could play this descent and give it integrity. Lizzie is the watchdog of truthfulness. If she was ever feeling like a scene was not real or a bit phony, she was resistant to it. That made us a good team.”

    Moss believes this has been the most challenging role of her career. “It took me 10 minutes to understand Leigh’s take and how modern and relevant this film could be,” Moss says. “I love how he upended the idea of The Invisible Man. It was one of those scripts that you read and think, ‘I wish I’d thought of that…’ It’s a great metaphor and completely relevant to our time…as well as to my time as a woman in this society.”

    Lensing The Invisible Man allowed Moss to reflect on the types of relationships that can be abusive or toxic. “It was important to Leigh and me that we made the space for a relationship that was not only physically abusive, but was also emotionally and psychologically abusive,” Moss says. “Those types of relationships can be just as damaging. I hope that this film gives some voice and strength to people who have been through that. As women, we feel like there’s a sense of empowerment, that we’re this generation that speaks up, but I think we sometimes still judge others for staying in relationships that they shouldn’t be in.”

    Moss concludes: “I think it’s important to give space for women to be weak. You can be strong and scared at the same time. And you can be strong and weak at the same time. You can be a feminist and still lose your voice. That’s important to remember and important to be able to see.”

    In Philippine cinemas February 26, The Invisible Man is distributed by United International Pictures through Columbia Pictures.  Follow us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/uipmoviesph/ ; Twitter at https://twitter.com/uipmoviesph and Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/uipmoviesph/. Connect with #TheInvisibleMan and tag uipmoviesph

  • forgforg Administrator PEx Moderator

    OLIVER JACKSON-COHEN PLAYS THE STALKING GAME IN “THE INVISIBLE MAN”

     

    Most recently seen in the hit Netflix anthology series, The Haunting of Hill House, Oliver Jackson-Cohen now stars in The Invisible Man, a terrifying modern tale of obsession from director-writer Leigh Whannell (Insidious: Chapter 3) and also stars Elisabeth Moss.


    Jackson-Cohen plays Cobalt CEO Adrian Griffin, an extremely wealthy and brilliant scientist, who is as handsome and charming as he is violently abusive. He is obsessed with Cecilia (Moss) and with controlling her…and will stop at nothing to get her back.

    At first, he just controlled Cecilia’s time…and who she talked to and when she left the house. Then, it was everything she said. Then, it was everything she thought. And, if he didn’t like what he assumed she was thinking, he would mete out punishment.

    Adrian has had a lot of success and has been validated by that, as far as his behavior is concerned. “In the modern world, you get a lot of credit for these achievements,” Whannell says, “and no one is calling you out on how you got there. What I wanted to tap into with him is the narcissism and sociopathy leading to success. It kills him that Cecilia would leave him…that someone would defy him in that way. He has this strong, pathological need to control her, and that’s definitely what’s driving him.”

    Oliver Jackson-Cohen says that there were several days where the key team sat in the rehearsal room to process the relationship dynamics. “It was just Lizzie, Leigh and me,” Jackson-Cohen says. “We wanted to show the cycle of what these relationships are about—how people end up back in these relationships, even though they know better. It’s about the pull of what these people do—specifically what Adrian does to hold Cecilia back and get her back where he needs her. Adrian is getting exactly what he wants, which is to see Cecilia suffer and to see her descend into madness.”

    Now playing in cinemas, The Invisible Man is distributed in the Philippines by United International Pictures through Columbia Pictures.  Follow us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/uipmoviesph/ ; Twitter at https://twitter.com/uipmoviesph and Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/uipmoviesph/. Connect with #TheInvisibleMan and tag uipmoviesph

  • crazy legscrazy legs PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    Good movie.  Suspense.  
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