Basket fall: Asia and Africa out of World Cup at first hurdle or should BB Philippines''#1"sport?

ArnoldZArnoldZ Member PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐

Basket fall: Asia and Africa out of World Cup at first hurdle

Peter STEBBINGS
AFPSeptember 4, 2019
U
It is the largest basketball World Cup ever but there will be no teams from Asia or Africa in the second round of the sport's global showpiece (AFP Photo/Ye Aung Thu)

It is the largest basketball World Cup ever but there will be no teams from Asia or Africa in the second round of the sport's global showpiece.

Hosts China with their 1.4 billion population crashed out of contention on Wednesday with a 72-59 defeat to Venezuela.

That came hours after Tunisia surrendered a spot in the next round, and a guaranteed place at the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, with an agonising 67-64 loss to Puerto Rico.

Nigeria thrashed South Korea 108-66 at the same time, but the fate of Africa's highest-ranked team already been sealed after losing both their opening games.

The last time there was no team from Asia or Africa in the second round was in 1998, when the championship had only 16 teams.

Now it has a record 32 but it is almost exclusively teams from the Americas, led by reigning champions the United States, and Europe who will compete for the medals.

Outside of those only Australia, nominally Asian in the FIBA rankings are concerned, have also reached the second round and they could be joined by New Zealand if they beat Greece on Thursday.

Paolo Povia, coach of the Ivory Coast, said there were "a lot of factors" why African sides had failed to make their mark in China.

"There's definitely a difference in experience and knowledge of the game," said Povia after his team lost 80-63 to Poland on Wednesday, their third defeat in three games.

"The development of the game (in Africa) is a little inconsistent. In our team we have some guys who have learned to play the game in different places all over the world.

"So you don't get the same continuity all the time in how the game is learned."

Basketball is hugely popular in the Philippines but the national team -- the joint-shortest at the competition -- have lost all three of their matches.

They were drubbed 108-62 and 126-67 by Italy and title-contenders Serbia respectively before narrowly succumbing to already eliminated Angola on Wednesday.

Serbia's plain-speaking coach Sasha Djordjevic said that the Philippines' lack of physicality and athleticism "might be the problem".

"Obviously you are missing quality," he told a reporter from the Philippines.

After easy wins over the Philippines and Angola, Djordjevic also questioned the format of the enlarged World Cup, containing eight groups of four countries in the first phase.

"There are some groups that from the start you practically know which two teams are going to advance," he said, shaking his head.

"I don't know if that's a good thing for the World Cup in general because what does it serve us?

"What does it serve the Philippine team losing by this points difference?" he said, of Serbia's 59-point win.

Ousted teams such as the Philippines need to rally themselves, because they now face a low-key "classification" round with Olympic qualifying in play.

https://news.yahoo.com/basket-fall-asia-africa-world-cup-first-hurdle-045820423--nba.html

Is it true the Philippines team ha2s the same coach for some 20 years? Why keep repeating that mistake over and over again?

And basketball is Philippines national sport,? "This sport is clearly not for China, Vietnam, Japan, Philippines or any asian country. This sport belongs to the Europeans and Americans, they have the height advantage and long legs to move across the court fast?

Maybe about time to have another sport where Pinoys will not fail in international competitions so embarrassingly.

Comments

  • Phil E. BusterPhil E. Buster Member PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    But what other sports have lots of money-making/earning potential? A basketball court is easy to build and can be a multi-function facilty. Swimming is a good sport where Filipinos can excel but how many schools can provide an Olympic size swimming for swimmers to practice? Very expensive to maintain needs too much water.
  • gotta lick itgotta lick it Member PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    we should follow the sports priorities of Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore and South Korea. they concentrated on individual sports like badminton, squash, archery, and taekwando.



    what happened to the badminton craze in the Philippines? it was hyped because the wife of the President is their national sports commission president. when her clout ended, so did the hype.
  • joerizjoeriz Member PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    we should follow the sports priorities of Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore and South Korea. they concentrated on individual sports like badminton, squash, archery, and taekwando.



    what happened to the badminton craze in the Philippines? it was hyped because the wife of the President is their national sports commission president. when her clout ended, so did the hype.
    But as mentioned by another PExer, BB has the biggest money-making potential, not so much for individual sports, where there is very limited people who can get involved for the money!
  • gotta lick itgotta lick it Member PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    cant wait for the FIFA qualifying results. Football is more popular in Asia and Africa than BB but Asians seems to be a competition filler to make the tournament diversified.


    joeriz said:
    we should follow the sports priorities of Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore and South Korea. they concentrated on individual sports like badminton, squash, archery, and taekwando.



    what happened to the badminton craze in the Philippines? it was hyped because the wife of the President is their national sports commission president. when her clout ended, so did the hype.
    But as mentioned by another PExer, BB has the biggest money-making potential, not so much for individual sports, where there is very limited people who can get involved for the money!
    Indonesia and Malaysia companies are making money in promoting badminton tournaments.

    quick ROI if there are less people involve because the cash flow will be shared by a few people. it is not a venue problem because you can play badminton in any covered facility ... kahit warehouse o barangay court. the problem is most barangay halls are given to basketball games.
  • joerizjoeriz Member PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    Maybe quick ROI but BB makes millions, and badminton or tennis can manage perhaps just high hundred Ks.

  • ArnoldZArnoldZ Member PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐

    Philippines must take a look at sports that will take kids off the street and maybe discover talented proteges.


    Orphan goes from sniffing 'Rugby' glue to playing for the Philippines

    Joshua MELVIN
    AFPSeptember 9, 2019
    Lito Ramirez 2nd L outpaces a line of defenders during a match in Silangan Laguna south of Manila
    View photos
    Lito Ramirez (2nd L) outpaces a line of defenders during a match in Silangan, Laguna, south of Manila (AFP Photo/Noel CELIS)

    Long before Lito Ramirez was one of the Philippines' first homegrown rugby stars he was a six-year-old orphan addicted to sniffing glue, who survived on trash and begging.

    If there was any luck in his hellish world, it was that the brand of glue he and other street kids used to get high was called "Rugby".

    The name still resonated with Ramirez years after he stopped using and was building his life in a Manila orphanage.

    Counsellors there had urged him to pick a sport, but he didn't like football or basketball, the national obsession. Then they asked him if he wanted to give rugby a try.

    "I didn't have any idea it was a sport," he told AFP. "I thought it was the glue. That's why I chose rugby for sports."

    This fateful misunderstanding would redirect his life, giving the scrappy five-foot six-inch (1.7-metre) wing/fullback a way off the streets and into the sort of full-time career he can only have dreamt about.

    It culminated with him becoming, in 2015, one of the first born and bred Pinoys (Filipinos) to land a spot on the Philippines national squad, the Volcanoes.

    To this day, the team is composed mostly of foreign-born players whose primary tie to the nation is a Filipino parent.

    - 'He's been through it all' -

    Jake Letts, general manager of the Philippine Rugby Football Union, has watched Ramirez develop from a raw talent to what he called a "dangerous" player on the pitch.

    "His strength is his speed and his agility. It's really hard for a big guy to catch him," Letts told AFP. "When they do catch him it can be painful."

    Letts said Ramirez's brutal upbringing is now a strength: "He's definitely got the grit. He's been through it all."

    Ramirez says he has no memory of his parents and is not even sure of their full names. In fact, he has no birth certificate, so he's not sure of his true birthday.

    He uses March 17, 1994, which was assigned to him when he was taken in by an orphanage. That makes him 25 years old, on paper at least.

    After his parents went missing, he and his older brother had ended up in the hands of a man he believes was an uncle. The man was an addict who sent the boys to beg on the streets of Manila, which is where they were introduced to glue-sniffing.

    So-called "Rugby boys" have been a problem in the Philippines for decades, despite promises of reforms from solvent manufacturers, merchants and the government.

    A small bottle of solvent still costs less than $1 in most shops.

    - 'I miss being a family' -

    Ramirez and his brother lived a perilous existence. They dug for food in the trash and were chased by the police, who arrested child addicts.

    "We slept wherever the night caught up with us," he said.

    That changed when a woman, shocked by how the boys were living, led them to an orphanage. They bounced between facilities over the coming years.

    Ramirez says that during that time he broke his addiction to glue because he was cut off from it and the bad influences of the street.

    Eventually the brothers ended up at Tuloy sa Don Bosco, a home that shelters street children and aims to teach them a trade.

    Playing rugby wasn't one of the options -- Ramirez studied to become a baker -- but when he was 11 he had the pivotal, if accidental, introduction to the game.

    He fell in love with the fast-paced action of the game and excelled at it. He started with small clubs, but was getting noticed in the tight-knit rugby community.

    Around 2012, he was asked to try out for the Philippines under-18 team. He kept rising until he won a spot on the Volcanoes in 2015.

    Yet that success cannot erase the gap left by his missing parents, and whether they are still alive is something that Ramirez thinks about every day.

    "I want to be with my parents. I miss being part of a family," he said. "I just don't know how I can find them."

    https://news.yahoo.com/orphan-goes-sniffing-rugby-glue-playing-philippines-014011717.html

    There are lots of sports that  Philippines should pay attention to develop and encourage.

  • Phil E. BusterPhil E. Buster Member PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    ArnoldZ said:

    Philippines must take a look at sports that will take kids off the street and maybe discover talented proteges.


    Orphan goes from sniffing 'Rugby' glue to playing for the Philippines

    Joshua MELVIN
    AFPSeptember 9, 2019
    Lito Ramirez 2nd L outpaces a line of defenders during a match in Silangan Laguna south of Manila
    View photos
    Lito Ramirez (2nd L) outpaces a line of defenders during a match in Silangan, Laguna, south of Manila (AFP Photo/Noel CELIS)

    Long before Lito Ramirez was one of the Philippines' first homegrown rugby stars he was a six-year-old orphan addicted to sniffing glue, who survived on trash and begging.

    If there was any luck in his hellish world, it was that the brand of glue he and other street kids used to get high was called "Rugby".

    The name still resonated with Ramirez years after he stopped using and was building his life in a Manila orphanage.

    Counsellors there had urged him to pick a sport, but he didn't like football or basketball, the national obsession. Then they asked him if he wanted to give rugby a try.

    "I didn't have any idea it was a sport," he told AFP. "I thought it was the glue. That's why I chose rugby for sports."

    This fateful misunderstanding would redirect his life, giving the scrappy five-foot six-inch (1.7-metre) wing/fullback a way off the streets and into the sort of full-time career he can only have dreamt about.

    It culminated with him becoming, in 2015, one of the first born and bred Pinoys (Filipinos) to land a spot on the Philippines national squad, the Volcanoes.

    To this day, the team is composed mostly of foreign-born players whose primary tie to the nation is a Filipino parent.

    - 'He's been through it all' -

    Jake Letts, general manager of the Philippine Rugby Football Union, has watched Ramirez develop from a raw talent to what he called a "dangerous" player on the pitch.

    "His strength is his speed and his agility. It's really hard for a big guy to catch him," Letts told AFP. "When they do catch him it can be painful."

    Letts said Ramirez's brutal upbringing is now a strength: "He's definitely got the grit. He's been through it all."

    Ramirez says he has no memory of his parents and is not even sure of their full names. In fact, he has no birth certificate, so he's not sure of his true birthday.

    He uses March 17, 1994, which was assigned to him when he was taken in by an orphanage. That makes him 25 years old, on paper at least.

    After his parents went missing, he and his older brother had ended up in the hands of a man he believes was an uncle. The man was an addict who sent the boys to beg on the streets of Manila, which is where they were introduced to glue-sniffing.

    So-called "Rugby boys" have been a problem in the Philippines for decades, despite promises of reforms from solvent manufacturers, merchants and the government.

    A small bottle of solvent still costs less than $1 in most shops.

    - 'I miss being a family' -

    Ramirez and his brother lived a perilous existence. They dug for food in the trash and were chased by the police, who arrested child addicts.

    "We slept wherever the night caught up with us," he said.

    That changed when a woman, shocked by how the boys were living, led them to an orphanage. They bounced between facilities over the coming years.

    Ramirez says that during that time he broke his addiction to glue because he was cut off from it and the bad influences of the street.

    Eventually the brothers ended up at Tuloy sa Don Bosco, a home that shelters street children and aims to teach them a trade.

    Playing rugby wasn't one of the options -- Ramirez studied to become a baker -- but when he was 11 he had the pivotal, if accidental, introduction to the game.

    He fell in love with the fast-paced action of the game and excelled at it. He started with small clubs, but was getting noticed in the tight-knit rugby community.

    Around 2012, he was asked to try out for the Philippines under-18 team. He kept rising until he won a spot on the Volcanoes in 2015.

    Yet that success cannot erase the gap left by his missing parents, and whether they are still alive is something that Ramirez thinks about every day.

    "I want to be with my parents. I miss being part of a family," he said. "I just don't know how I can find them."

    https://news.yahoo.com/orphan-goes-sniffing-rugby-glue-playing-philippines-014011717.html

    There are lots of sports that  Philippines should pay attention to develop and encourage.

    This is the kind of sports that do not discriminate. More like it should be encouraged and perhaps even subsidized.

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