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The Culinary Capital of the Philippines is?

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  • LJ_McKanasLJ_McKanas PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    More from Solita Kalaw:

    "I added some facts. I am the niece of Cecilia Kalaw, the daughter of Demetrio Kalaw who actually introduced the dish in Manila after he married my mother who is from Iriga City . Cecilia Kalaw didn't grow up in Bicol like what the article says."

    From "Bicol Express: Revision history" available at https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Bicol_Express&action=history.
  • LJ_McKanasLJ_McKanas PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    sige na bicol express is "gulay na lada." and chopsuey is "sauteed vegetables."





    here is one more ....
    baka yun ugali ng tig-iisang probinsyano ang nagpalago ng kanilang pagluluto?

    bulakeyno = konserbatibo = kaya puro secret recipe kada bahay at sinasama nila sa hukay ang kanila recipe
    kapampangan = mayabang = kaya d'best daw sila
    ilocano = masinop = kaya creative gumawa ng pagkakakitaan
    ilonggo = malambing = kaya comfort food ang pambato nila
    manileano = malakas ang kolonial mentality = kaya puro tinapay ang pinagmamalaki
    bicolano = matigas ang ulo = kaya puro may niyog yun luto

    Ummm... whatever.
  • gotta lick itgotta lick it PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    matagal ang chopsuey ........... sauteed vegetable lang iyan diba? crazy americans.
  • ka_denizka_deniz PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    by your own admission, what you cook is "gulay na lada" not bicol express.

    so maybe my mom's friend was lying, maybe. i forgot her name now, but i know her personally and not from some wikipedia entry.

    but again, i stand by what i said. real bicol express does not have anything else but chili, aromatics, coconut milk and cream and pork fat. it is not ulam, but an additive to ulam to adjust the hotness of the viand. you in bicol love chillies, we in manila don't. we let ur diners have the choice of how much chilli they want in their food. bicol express was concocted as a milk based hot sauce as a replacement vinegar based hot sauce that would change the flavor profile of the dish.

    also, try looking up who doreen g fernandez was. she was the one who also told me about it in college.

    hindi ito wikipedia entry, malamang libro, so mahihirapan ka magresearch. marunong ka gumamit ng library?
  • LJ_McKanasLJ_McKanas PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    ka_deniz wrote: »
    by your own admission, what you cook is "gulay na lada" not bicol express.

    so maybe my mom's friend was lying, maybe. i forgot her name now, but i know her personally and not from some wikipedia entry.

    but again, i stand by what i said. real bicol express does not have anything else but chili, aromatics, coconut milk and cream and pork fat. it is not ulam, but an additive to ulam to adjust the hotness of the viand. you in bicol love chillies, we in manila don't. we let ur diners have the choice of how much chilli they want in their food. bicol express was concocted as a milk based hot sauce as a replacement vinegar based hot sauce that would change the flavor profile of the dish.

    also, try looking up who doreen g fernandez was. she was the one who also told me about it in college.

    hindi ito wikipedia entry, malamang libro, so mahihirapan ka magresearch. marunong ka gumamit ng library?

    If you google the term Bicol Express, everything on your first page will refer you to an ulam and not just a pampaanghang.

    I know how to use the library but the person who's referring me to a source better cite the title of the book.

    Also, gulay na lada = bicol express. Bicol Express was just coined to make gulay na lada marketable in Manila. Just because the two do not sound the same, it doesn't mean that they are not one and the same. Every Bicolano will tell you that they are the same dish. We know this because we cook the dish ourselves, unlike you Manilenyos who just discovered Bicol Express by the mere fact that it was served on your plates.
  • ka_denizka_deniz PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    wehehehehe!!!

    hindi marunong magcrossreference ng author at topic. puro google lang ang kaya. puro wikipedia.

    dang! what's happening to the product of today's education?
  • LJ_McKanasLJ_McKanas PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    ka_deniz wrote: »
    wehehehehe!!!

    hindi marunong magcrossreference ng author at topic. puro google lang ang kaya. puro wikipedia.

    dang! what's happening to the product of today's education?

    Lol. You're probably trolling. All you can do is resort to argumenta ad hominem.
  • ka_denizka_deniz PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    probably.

    but i already gave you everything you need to know if you really are interested.

    gotta lick it is still correct. bicol express is a metro manila concoction.
  • LJ_McKanasLJ_McKanas PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    ^^But you didn't give me the title of the book or whatever your reference is. Are you expecting me that I will do my research from just that? I have work and I'm busy at the office; I don't have time to exert as much effort as you want me to for something so trivial as this.

    Besides, your claim that Bicol Express was concocted sometime in the 1980s is refuted by so many sources saying that it was either invented or popularized as far back as the 1960s.

    And what we do know here in Bicol is that Bicol Express is not a mere pampaanghang but an ulam. You visit all the restaurants serving local cuisine here and all of them will give you an ulam if you order Bicol Express.
  • ach_chooach_choo PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    That crazy guy Celdran claims that when Rajah Solaiman was driven out of Manila by Legaspi's people, the Sultan's best cooks went to Bulacan and Pampanga. That's the closest we had to having royal cuisine.

    Of course, Celdran talks BS most of the time.
  • gotta lick itgotta lick it PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    add 1

    there was a time, when the Spaniards periodically forced the Chinese out of binondo. these exiles and their great cooks settled in Pampanga.
  • LJ_McKanasLJ_McKanas PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    Just ate Bicol Express for lunch at Small Talk Cafe a couple of hours ago. It's so much hotter and spicier than the ones I tasted in Manila, which, almost invariably tasted sweeter.

    I want the Bicol Express here in Bicol much more than the ones served there in Manila. Tastes really good! :)

    And, for the life of me, I don't understand why Bicol Express could taste sweet. It should be MAANGHANG.
  • ka_denizka_deniz PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    there are a lot of theories about how cuisine in pampanga and bulacan developed, and most of them logical if you looked at it thru the lens of history. migration is a major factor. the spanish invasion probably drove the locals northward, then the british came. when they left, the sepoys were stranded here, who again migrated northward. the succeeding economic boom, coupled with the cultural diversity there, most probably then helped develop their cuisine.

    what i find curious is why those people chose north. when the most logical and easier route would have been south to laguna. the pasig river would have been an easier highway for travel. both areas are flat fertile lands. fertile agricultural lands, suitable to planting rice, corn and sugar cane.

    an accident of history perhaps?
  • gotta lick itgotta lick it PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    ^ laguna does not have a port plus, laguna belongs to a mountain range. during that time, laguna may have been a lush forest.

    even before the spaniards, pampanga had a sultanate community.
  • ka_denizka_deniz PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    lakandula's sultanate was in pampanga.

    laguna de bay already had a fishing community, the areas around it were flatlands, and yup, no organized or developed kingdom on record.

    it is hard to believe that it was the spanish friars who actually started a thriving community there. the friars would more logically gravitate towards local communities since their primary motivation was colonization. was the northward migration motivated more by avoidance of spanish strongholds?
  • etxeteraetxetera PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    Ang dami ko natutunan keep them coming :)
  • ach_chooach_choo PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    I personally think Ilocano cooking is the heartiest, no-frills cooking here. I'm just partial to their principal spicing. If you can master the Ilocano trinity, it's something:

    1. tomato to make it sweet
    2. bagoong (isda) to give it a bite
    3. ampalaya to make it bitter

    Crazy Manilans insist on using alamang to flavor their pakbet. Yuck.
  • gotta lick itgotta lick it PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    ang tomato daw ng pinoy ay sweet. asukal or sukang iloko poh ang ginagamit para tumamis.

    you forgot about bawang. ilokanos loves bawang.
  • pantone #000pantone #000 PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    My vote goes to Ilocos region/Ilokano food. Not because I spent more summers there than in Pampanga but I personally think they have a more balanced cuisine.

    Masarap naman talaga lutong Kapampangan pero parang lahat lang kasi malinamnam. Wala pa yata akong natikman na simple lang. (Post kayo kung meron, inaamin ko hindi parin kasi ganun kadami ang alam ko sa Kapampangan food).

    Sa ibang pagkakataon maghahanap ka ng bland lang (easy on the tastebuds). Yun ang gusto ko sa lutong Ilokano: may mga simple lang gaya ng Diningdeng at Sinaing na Isda, may extremely rich na Dinakdakan at Menudong Taba ng baboy (nakalimutan ko na ang totoong pangalan pero madalas 'to sa mga handaan sa barrio/bundok). Best of both worlds. 😁
  • gooseberrygooseberry 🐯 Tiger Squad🥈
    In the city, I prefer foods that are made in Malabon. Marami silang kakanin, minatamis, seafood is always fresh and of abundance- eh nasa tabing dagat eh. :glee:

    Next city that comes close to home cooked meals is Marikina. Being a residential city, a lot of tindahan and kainan springs up and boasts of their culinary expertise- Labu-labo and in a very good way.
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