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the PROBLEM with COMPANIES that hire new graduates

this is the twin of "the problem with new graduates" post - there are two sides to a coin, right?

these are the experiences of new graduates wo get hired into the job market :

> not enough FORMAL training most companies tend to have nothing but on the job training. so you are left alone to fend for yourself. sink or swim on your own

> even with some formal training, its not that relevant - too generic and god. motherhood and country type of training

> trainers and even bosses are not talented enough to train new graduates. they dont know how to train. not to mention they are not even that good in their own jobs

> and what???? 5% to 10% salary increase!??!!

Comments

  • kesibikesibi PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    I agree with your sentiment.

    Lucky for me coz even before I graduated in College, I'm starting to earn money thru my sidelines (stuffs that would be profitable at the same time, learning more on how the "real" world moves).

    My suggestion is if you are nearly to graduate in college, better take some experiences (such as OJT, Interviews on professional -even it might look like an school requirement)

    This is the lesson I've learned before i Graduated:
    School is your training ground and outside school is your Battlefield!
  • HulkHulk PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    What did you guys expect? :mconfused:

    Working is much different from school guys. Nobody is there to hold your hand anymore. The good thing about it is that you're being paid.

    The basic skills that you need to survive in the corporate world were all taught in college or should have been experienced in your extra-curricular activities. The rest you have to learn on your own.

    I remember during my third day on the job as an internal auditor (my first job), I was given my first assignment. I was paired up with a senior who was clueless as I am since he was a transferee. I even had to bring my college auditing book just to guide me sa audit procedures.

    You would be very lucky to have a boss who is both smart and caring. Sometimes you would be lucky enough to settle for a single trait.

    My message is don't waste your time in college kagi-gimik, learn things that you think you will need. Tama si kesibi work during summers. Sayang ang oras.


    :frank:
  • > not enough FORMAL training most companies tend to have nothing but on the job training. so you are left alone to fend for yourself. sink or swim on your own

    > even with some formal training, its not that relevant - too generic and god. motherhood and country type of training

    > trainers and even bosses are not talented enough to train new graduates. they dont know how to train. not to mention they are not even that good in their own jobs

    > and what???? 5% to 10% salary increase!??!!
    That's why you have school, you know. And don't go immediately for high-paying, high-profile jobs. chances are, if you're inexperienced and sheltered, you'll fall flat on your face. Work from the bottom up, after all, a job is just another venue for learning. go to a small companies where you'll get hands-on training, whether formal or not. And don't gripe about it, for goodness sakes! just be quick-witted and eager to milk the company for as much experience as it can give you.

    Aside from working summers (and part-time, if you can manage it) is to become active in school organizations. Take the lead. This way you'll learn to manage people and cultivate the much-needed skill of schmoozing. (sad but true)

    Good luck!
  • There are companies who train fresh graduates well. But there are also those who take advantage of the fact that fresh graduates need experience and that's why they settle for meager salaries. There are also companies who abuse the "ignorance" of some fresh graduates when it comes to complying with labor laws.

    Yes, few companies are really sincere in providing good training to fresh graduates. As to "bosses" who are not that qualified or who do not know their trade, well, I've this to say. There are also fresh graduates who believe that what they learned from College is enough for them to be "bosses"... Your immediate superior may appear as if he/she doesn't know much but the fact is, he was promoted and he was trusted by themanagement to perform his/her tasks. Whatever it is, you cannot judge a person just like that. As I keep on saying before, some decisions of management may appear stupid to you but as you grow older you'll fidn out that there's wisdom in their decisions.

    For you tobe able to learn your craft well enough, first lesson is you've got to respect and learn from your superiors. ;)
  • the truth is there are companies who hire new graduates because they are cheap labor!
  • Originally posted by Mymnosene

    That's why you have school, you know. And don't go immediately for high-paying, high-profile jobs. chances are, if you're inexperienced and sheltered, you'll fall flat on your face. Work from the bottom up, after all, a job is just another venue for learning. go to a small companies where you'll get hands-on training, whether formal or not. And don't gripe about it, for goodness sakes! just be quick-witted and eager to milk the company for as much experience as it can give you.

    Aside from working summers (and part-time, if you can manage it) is to become active in school organizations. Take the lead. This way you'll learn to manage people and cultivate the much-needed skill of schmoozing. (sad but true)

    Good luck!
    i dont know about not going for the high-payingm hig profile jobs ---- i would always tell new graduates to hit for the moon always! but they need to be prepared to work hard and of course fail at it. the higher paying, higher profile, the more competitive!

    problem with small companies is that there is practically no training available and the systems and working environment are also well....small. so not enough to learn from them.
  • I agree that some companies train OJT's well. San Miguel Corp. is one of them. I know coz am one of their trainee before. May program talaga sila para sa mga OJT nila. Lot's of training and u get also an allowance and lots of freebies, PBA tickets n food. Grabe nakakataba dun. Pero malaki rin talaga ang matitipid ng company kapag kumuha sila ng OJT. Since ang bayad sa isa nilang IT staff nila sa pagkakaalam ko di bababa ng 18,000 isa.So sa dami ng OJT nila yung mga seniors nalang ang tinira nila para mag-supervise sa mga trainee.Yun nga lang mahirap ang pumasok dun.Yung nga lang mahirap pumasok.Pansin ko mga kakilala lang nila school pinagkukunan nila at medyo mahirap din ang screening pero worth it naman.Kadalasan mga taga La Salle nandun since halos lahat ng employee ay from la salle.Iilan lang talaga kami dati na di galing sa lasalle.Kung hindi naman atebeo and UA&P or APC maliban dun wala na.Ewan ko lang ngayon kung nagbago na wala na akong balita.Basta recommended talaga dun kapag sa IT ka.
  • tadeustadeus PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    ...APC?...
  • mac_bolan00mac_bolan00 PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    any company with an obvious bias for the "top-four" schools is a stupid company. all other issues surrounding hiring are insignificant.
  • .... I guess any company will only want to employ the very best! Spoon feeding days are over .... it is a jungle out there ... where you separate the man from the boys! Work is work .... having fun while you do it is fully dependent on you.;)

    I know what you feel ... been there, done that ....and worst! Long story if I'll tell you my working experience. Sometimes, even I can't believe what I've been through.

    As a final line: there's more to come and be brave enough to face and tackle it with all you've got ...otherwise:QUIT! You know who's that for ....!?;)
  • HulkHulk PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    Originally posted by mac_bolan00
    any company with an obvious bias for the "top-four" schools is a stupid company. all other issues surrounding hiring are insignificant.

    I understand that bias is bad, but sometimes it would be impractical to interview a lot of applicants. Staffing is merely 1/5 of the management function. Once I got fed up and even limited the candidates to three specific business programs which covered only two schools. Now that's bias! Nagagalit na nga sa akin yung HR namin pero it really made my job easier and I was satisfied sa mga nakuha ko. *okay*

    The ones I hired were more expensive than most but they were worth it. I don't mind paying for a premium so long as they create value for the group and the company.

    I think students should realize that choosing the right school and the right course/program is an important decision that will affect them greatly in their career choices. Now I don't deny that there are a lot of gems to be found in other schools, but again, sometimes it's really a waste of time to go after these guys when you could already find what you're looking for in a small pool of candidates, especially now that it is an employer's market.


    :frank:
  • Hulk,
    Let me get this straight. There are a lot of gems to be found in the other schools and it is an employers' market, and so you hired the more expensive ones from a smaller pool of candidates because it is impractical to interview a lot of applicants ????
  • Originally posted by Hulk


    I understand that bias is bad, but sometimes it would be impractical to interview a lot of applicants. Staffing is merely 1/5 of the management function. Once I got fed up and even limited the candidates to three specific business programs which covered only two schools. Now that's bias! Nagagalit na nga sa akin yung HR namin pero it really made my job easier and I was satisfied sa mga nakuha ko. *okay*

    The ones I hired were more expensive than most but they were worth it. I don't mind paying for a premium so long as they create value for the group and the company.

    I think students should realize that choosing the right school and the right course/program is an important decision that will affect them greatly in their career choices. Now I don't deny that there are a lot of gems to be found in other schools, but again, sometimes it's really a waste of time to go after these guys when you could already find what you're looking for in a small pool of candidates, especially now that it is an employer's market.


    :frank:
    i agree this is a reality. it is true that you have better chances of getting the people your company needs from certain schools.

    life is really never fair.
  • HulkHulk PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    Originally posted by qtpi
    Hulk,
    Let me get this straight. There are a lot of gems to be found in the other schools and it is an employers' market, and so you hired the more expensive ones from a smaller pool of candidates because it is impractical to interview a lot of applicants ????

    Yup. As I said, I once told our HR to limit the applicants to three specific business programs which in my honest opinion are the best business courses in the country. Obviously only a small number of people graduate from these programs.

    Interviewing aside from being time consuming is a very hard skill to master, you wouldn't really know kung binobola ka lang ng applicant. By limiting the search on these candidates, I can at least be assured of certain qualities (i.e. smart & hardworking).

    Now since only a few people graduate from these courses, they command a certain premium over other graduates, since they are also pursued by other companies. I mean what's an additional P5,000 a month, that's only P70,000 per year (14 months) if you have a limited assurance that they can bring in more than 100x their salary in additional revenues.

    Now a lot of you would probably disagree with this style of hiring but trust me it's effective.

    With regards to impracticality (my word ba na ganito?) of interviewing a lot of applicants, totoo iyon. Let's say you open your doors and interview 30 people for a slot. At 30 minutes each that would consume about 15 man-hours of your time, not to mention the time of your HR and the time of your principals. You're practically talking about 6 full working days. Mahal iyon!


    :frank:
  • these are the facts and the hard realities :

    > its a HIGHLY COMPETITIVE job market. too many wanting jobs for too few jobs available.

    > companies that hire are also in a HIGHLY COMPETITIVE MARKET. it is a business - profits and losses are a reality.

    > THERE ARE DIFFERENCES in terms of skills and quality from one job applicant to another, from one school to another, from one hiring company to another.

    > bottom line is : THE BEST MAN/WOMAN WINS!
  • HulkHulk PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    Originally posted by qtpi
    Hulk,
    Let me get this straight. There are a lot of gems to be found in the other schools and it is an employers' market, and so you hired the more expensive ones from a smaller pool of candidates because it is impractical to interview a lot of applicants ????

    Yup. As I said, I once told our HR to limit the applicants to three specific business programs which in my honest opinion are the best business courses in the country. Obviously only a small number of people graduate from these programs.

    Interviewing aside from being time consuming is a very hard skill to master, you wouldn't really know kung binobola ka lang ng applicant. By limiting the search on these candidates, I can at least be assured of certain qualities (i.e. smart & hardworking).

    Now since only a few people graduate from these courses, they command a certain premium over other graduates, since they are also pursued by other companies. I mean what's an additional P5,000 a month, that's only P70,000 per year (14 months) if you have a limited assurance that they can bring in more than 100x their salary in additional revenues.

    Now a lot of you would probably disagree with this style of hiring but trust me it's effective.

    With regards to impracticality (my word ba na ganito?) of interviewing a lot of applicants, totoo iyon. Let's say you open your doors and interview 30 people for a slot. At 30 minutes each that would consume about 15 man-hours of your time, not to mention the time of your HR and the time of your principals. You're practically talking about 6 full working days. Mahal iyon!


    :frank:
  • Originally posted by Hulk


    Yup. As I said, I once told our HR to limit the applicants to three specific business programs which in my honest opinion are the best business courses in the country. Obviously only a small number of people graduate from these programs.

    Interviewing aside from being time consuming is a very hard skill to master, you wouldn't really know kung binobola ka lang ng applicant. By limiting the search on these candidates, I can at least be assured of certain qualities (i.e. smart & hardworking).

    Now since only a few people graduate from these courses, they command a certain premium over other graduates, since they are also pursued by other companies. I mean what's an additional P5,000 a month, that's only P70,000 per year (14 months) if you have a limited assurance that they can bring in more than 100x their salary in additional revenues.

    Now a lot of you would probably disagree with this style of hiring but trust me it's effective.

    With regards to impracticality (my word ba na ganito?) of interviewing a lot of applicants, totoo iyon. Let's say you open your doors and interview 30 people for a slot. At 30 minutes each that would consume about 15 man-hours of your time, not to mention the time of your HR and the time of your principals. You're practically talking about 6 full working days. Mahal iyon!


    :frank:
    sounds sensible to me.

    its something that job seekers need to take into consideration. up to the job seeker to exploit it or to plan to win over it. a reality that must be managed.
  • mac_bolan00mac_bolan00 PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    Originally posted by abcxyz
    > THERE ARE DIFFERENCES in terms of skills and quality from one job applicant to another, from one school to another, from one hiring company to another.

    > bottom line is : THE BEST MAN/WOMAN WINS!
    only the first clause is correct. all the others are lies calculated to put many people at an imaginary disadvantage. this furthers my thesis that the HR industry in the country is centuries behind.
  • Originally posted by mac_bolan00

    only the first clause is correct. all the others are lies calculated to put many people at an imaginary disadvantage. this furthers my thesis that the HR industry in the country is centuries behind.
    i dont know how far behind the hr industry is in the philippines. but i dont think its that far behind. maybe hr practitioners should comment on this.

    i dont think there is a direct intent to put anyone at a disadvantage, like discrimination, i think its an acceptance and acting upon the fact that there are differences in qualities and skill sets.

    unfortunately, this country puts too much premium on schooling/education and too little on experience, skill sets and achievements. kaya tuloy sobra ang dami ng diploma mills sa pilipinas. most people think just having a diploma, any diploma will do.
  • zimdudezimdude PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    What are your thoughts on the type of training hiring companies should offer?

    They would need to build upon a foundation existing within the employee's education and skills...
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