Philippine Transportation, Infrastructure and Urban Planning

AnnKnownAnnKnown Member PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
I'm starting a thread where we can all post news and articles regarding Philippine Transportation, Infrastructure and Urban Planning. :)
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  • AnnKnownAnnKnown Member PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    Budget chief: Duterte admin to usher in ‘golden age of infrastructure’

    By: Ben O. de Vera
    @BenArnolddeVera
    Philippine Daily Inquirer
    03:47 PM July 20th, 2016




    The Duterte administration’s plan to jack up infrastructure spending to up to 7 percent of the economy by 2022 would bring about a “golden age of infrastructure” in the next six years, Budget Secretary Benjamin E. Diokno said Wednesday.

    Diokno nonetheless told reporters that despite the planned spending boost, it may take a decade before the infrastructure gap in the country would be totally addressed.


    The Budget chief was also pitching more “hybrid” public-private partnership (PPP) projects to speed up infrastructure development.


    In a speech at the general membership meeting of the Financial Executives Institute of the Philippines (Finex), Diokno said the government will spend close to P900 billion on hard public infrastructure next year to make up for years of “neglect.”


    Diokno said they plan to rollout “simultaneously, not sequentially,” small, medium and large projects in all regions.

    The budget chief had said the Duterte administration will order non-stop or 24-hours-a-day, seven-days-a-week construction work on most urban-based projects to fast-track infrastructure buildup.

    From a share of 5.2 percent of the gross domestic product (GDP) next year, infrastructure spending will be hiked to 7 percent of GDP by the end of the Duterte administration, Diokno said.


    Three to four more railway lines in Metro Manila are needed to shuttle commuters in the metropolis alongside additional airports, he said.

    Diokno said the Duterte administration would have to decide on where to build a new air transport hub—whether Sangley Point in Cavite or Clark in Pampanga—within the year.

    President Rodrigo R. Duterte himself was also proposing a highway connecting Clark and Makati City, he added.

    The government will continue to enjoin private sector participation in the infrastructure buildup through PPP, although the Budget chief said he prefers “hybrid” PPP projects.

    Under the hybrid PPP setup that Diokno was pushing for, the government will build the facility and later on tap a private firm for maintenance.


    As such, the government could finance projects at a lower cost through official development assistance (ODA) from donor agencies while tapping private contractors, Diokno said.

    Once the projects are finished, the government would have to bid out the maintenance contract. “The government is poor in maintenance, so we should give it to the private sector,” the Budget chief explained. JE
  • AnnKnownAnnKnown Member PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    Clark airport can't replace NAIA, says airport exec


    Posted at Jul 20 2016 06:56 PM

    MANILA - Clark International Airport Corp. is not capable of accommodating all flights operating out of the Ninoy Aquino International Airport (NAIA), the president and chief executive officer of Clark International Airport Corp., Emigdio Tanjuatco III, said Wednesday.



    Shutting down NAIA and transferring flights to Clark is "very unrealistic and not doable," Tanjuatco said.

    On Monday, around 20 flights were diverted to Clark International Airport after the NAIA had to undergo emergency repairs.

    READ: NAIA runway reopens after emergency repairs

    But Tanjuatco said that while the flights were able to land safely in Clark, the airport does not have the operational capability, security, and infrastructure to replace NAIA.

    "If you're going to close NAIA and bring everything to Clark, then you're just transferring the problems of NAIA to Clark," Tanjuatco said.
    Passengers of various airlines that were forced to disembark at the Clark International Airport wait for transportation to Metro Manila following the diversion of at least 28 flights from the Ninoy Aquino International Airport due to problems with the runway of the Manila airport on July 18, 2016. Photo courtesy of Clark International Airport

    Clark's only advantage over NAIA is that it has more available slots for flights in the afternoon, he said.

    "If there's any government directive or policy to redistribute traffic of aircraft from NAIA is a welcome development for Clark, but it should be done in a well-planned and coordinated way," he told ANC's "Market Edge with Cathy Yang" on Wednesday.

    The terminal at Clark airport can only accommodate around 4 million passengers per annum compared to NAIA's capacity of more than 30 million.

    Government has been studying the viability of other airports to address congestion at the NAIA, which has resulted in flight delays.
  • ibarra28ibarra28 Member PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    Of course it cannot, in the short term. But does Mr. Tanjuatco have a long term outlook?

    FYI, Clark has total land area of 37 square kilometers. (NAIA has a land area of less than 5 square kilometers.) Though a large portion has been converted to mixed used, still there is enough land area to expand the airport infrastructure at Clark.

    The public knows you can't build that in 3 -days.

    Pero may long-term proposal ba si Tanjuatco? Mali naman yung sabihin na lang na "very unrealistic and not doable".



    AnnKnown wrote: »
    Clark airport can't replace NAIA, says airport exec


    Posted at Jul 20 2016 06:56 PM

    MANILA - Clark International Airport Corp. is not capable of accommodating all flights operating out of the Ninoy Aquino International Airport (NAIA), the president and chief executive officer of Clark International Airport Corp., Emigdio Tanjuatco III, said Wednesday.



    Shutting down NAIA and transferring flights to Clark is "very unrealistic and not doable," Tanjuatco said.

    On Monday, around 20 flights were diverted to Clark International Airport after the NAIA had to undergo emergency repairs.

    READ: NAIA runway reopens after emergency repairs

    But Tanjuatco said that while the flights were able to land safely in Clark, the airport does not have the operational capability, security, and infrastructure to replace NAIA.

    "If you're going to close NAIA and bring everything to Clark, then you're just transferring the problems of NAIA to Clark," Tanjuatco said.
    Passengers of various airlines that were forced to disembark at the Clark International Airport wait for transportation to Metro Manila following the diversion of at least 28 flights from the Ninoy Aquino International Airport due to problems with the runway of the Manila airport on July 18, 2016. Photo courtesy of Clark International Airport

    Clark's only advantage over NAIA is that it has more available slots for flights in the afternoon, he said.

    "If there's any government directive or policy to redistribute traffic of aircraft from NAIA is a welcome development for Clark, but it should be done in a well-planned and coordinated way," he told ANC's "Market Edge with Cathy Yang" on Wednesday.

    The terminal at Clark airport can only accommodate around 4 million passengers per annum compared to NAIA's capacity of more than 30 million.

    Government has been studying the viability of other airports to address congestion at the NAIA, which has resulted in flight delays.
  • deathzero23deathzero23 Member PExer
    I hope Sec.Tugade could consider this...
    TAKING CONTROL | Speed limiters for buses
    http://www.interaksyon.com/motoring/taking-control-speed-limiters-for-buses
    Countless lives and damage to property amounting to millions of pesos have been lost due to accidents involving speeding trucks and buses. To curb this road menace, both the government and safety advocates have enacted laws to minimize, if not eradicate such deadly occurrences.

    Complimenting safety guidelines and measures set by the government in our main thoroughfares are the various technologies to counter erring bus and truck drivers who drive like speed demons. One such product was launched recently, Autokontrol Speed Limiter which enables bus and truck operators to control the speed of their vehicles by way of Geo tagging.

    Autokontrol can provide directions to the engine to travel at only specific speeds for specific areas making sure that when the trucks or buses enter a highly urbanized area they remain within safe speeds at all times. Because Autokontrol manages the throttle of the engine, it is has also been certified as an efficient emission control. The bus and trucks have better emissions and improved fuel efficiency.

    A seal and cable system ensures that the gadget is not tampered with and can be monitored and controlled by any government agency.

    Autokontrol speed limiters is a fly by wire technology used worldwide for years and have produced fuel savings where the vehicles have been used on long distance operations, cleaner emissions and safer travel through the use of speed controls. With services in over 40 different countries, Autokontrol have been in the business of developing and fitting of speed controls and vehicle speed control technology for the past 30 years.

    Autokontrol speed limiters have worldwide certification in countries that have already established speed control legislation such as Egypt and India. The Philippines has just recently passed a bill for speed controls on trucks and buses at the bicameral committee level and is waiting for presidential signature to become law.

    Every Autokontrol speed limiter is affordable, costing as low as tracking devices with no recurrent cost and installed by TSS, which carries a warranty of 150,000 km or 3 years.

    According to Autokontrol data, a leading haulage company in Nigeria, ABC Transport Plc, was able to reduce major accidents involving its fleet by 40% by installing speed limiters on 30% of its vehicles.

    Also, British Gas, a British fuel company, achieved a 10% saving in fuel consumption by installing speed limiters on their vehicles, while Angus Council achieved a 4.4% fuel consumption saving on 65 Renault Clios, over the first three months of installation.

    WHO and the Global Road Safety Partnership have consistently advised that speed limiters be introduced in every country, because these devices not only help in extending the lifespan of vehicle engines, a fact now known to most leasing companies, but also help in reducing fleet downtime as well as insurance costs.

    Autokontrol is distributed by AutoKontrol Philippines Corporation.
  • phoenixrisingphoenixrising Member PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    I'm hoping for a new international airport that will replace NAIA. Yes, we need a new international airport for Metro Manila. Clark Airport is better suited to cater to Central Luzon and Northern Luzon.

    I don't care whether it's in Sangley or Manila Bay. We need this badly and they should decide on it THIS YEAR.
  • peterinpeterin Member PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    AnnKnown wrote: »
    Clark airport can't replace NAIA, says airport exec

    ...
    The terminal at Clark airport can only accommodate around 4 million passengers per annum compared to NAIA's capacity of more than 30 million.

    ...

    Sana naman, ang pinipili sa higher government service, yung ang abot ng tanaw ay hindi lang sa kabilang bakod.

    Nagsabi na nga na "but it should be done in a well-planned and coordinated way", sinilat pa.

    Pede naman gradual. Jan papasok ang synchronization ng infra at gradual "move"
  • rodinarodina Member PExer
    Can somebody please put the JICA study/proposal under Tugade's radar? Gusto ko yon. Palanadong-planado; hindi patchy patchy. Even Palafox is pushing it.
  • deathzero23deathzero23 Member PExer
    If DU30 pushes thru with the JICA Plan,
    Let's see kung sino kokontra dito..

    Para malaman natin kung sino ang namumulitika lang.
  • rodinarodina Member PExer
    AnnKnown wrote: »
    Budget chief: Duterte admin to usher in ‘golden age of infrastructure’

    By: Ben O. de Vera
    @BenArnolddeVera
    Philippine Daily Inquirer
    03:47 PM July 20th, 2016

    Golden age? Nako, allergic si Pnoy sa term na yon. Every new infrastructure that will have been built during Duterte's term will be a painful reminder of all the golden opportunities missedby his admin.:D

    Sayang na sayang talaga.:weep:
  • peterinpeterin Member PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    rodina wrote: »
    Can somebody please put the JICA study/proposal under Tugade's radar? Gusto ko yon. Palanadong-planado; hindi patchy patchy. Even Palafox is pushing it.

    It seems 5sqkm is just too small for a hub in the future. Maybe it is better to build a more spacious one, reduce the area enough for domestic use, and then sell the rest.

    That will also help decongest MM, reduce polution, and pay part of a new one.
  • deathzero23deathzero23 Member PExer
    Kelangan mag-spend sa Infra. Para umikot yung pera, generate jobs.
    Basta maayos ang pagpapatupad.

    May narinig pa ako noong eleksyon (i don't know if it's true), sabi ni DU30 siya na lang daw hahawak ng bidding para iwas corruption :lol:
  • cinelamourcinelamour Member PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    I'm hoping for a new international airport that will replace NAIA. Yes, we need a new international airport for Metro Manila. Clark Airport is better suited to cater to Central Luzon and Northern Luzon.

    I don't care whether it's in Sangley or Manila Bay. We need this badly and they should decide on it THIS YEAR.

    panahon pa dapat ni aquino iyan! kaso ang bagal-bagal-bagal-bagal-bagal-bagal-bagal........... bagal niyang kumilos! :lol:
  • ibarra28ibarra28 Member PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    Why would Clark not be suited to service Metro Manila? Distance?

    In Japan, the primary international airport servicing Tokyo is Narita which is about 77km away.

    Though Clark is 96 km away from Metro Manila (from 0.00 km in Rizal Park), if a complementing railway line is built, distance should not be issue.

    Yes, matagal pa yan matatapos, but given the problem at hand due to the shortsightedness of past administrations, we now must think long-term.

    Sangley's current land area is not even bigger than NAIA and reclamation will be needed to expand it. The proposed "Manila Bay" will also have to be reclaimed. Both options will have an airport beside a body of water. Only recently in 2011, typhoon Pedring caused a storm surge at Manila Bay. A similar event can very well submerge any airport situated along Manila Bay; and given the frequency of typhoons that hits this country, an airport beside a body of water is obviously not advisable. Huwag na natin pag-usapan ang susceptability ng reclaimed land to liquefaction especially if there is an earthquake, at di naman maitatanggi na eathquake prone din tayo.

    Baka pumutok uli ang Pinatubo at ilibing sa abo ang Clark? Well, geologist have established that Mt. Pinatubo has a cycle of about 500 years between major eruptions. That 500 years is definitely longer than any long term plan.


    I'm hoping for a new international airport that will replace NAIA. Yes, we need a new international airport for Metro Manila. Clark Airport is better suited to cater to Central Luzon and Northern Luzon.

    I don't care whether it's in Sangley or Manila Bay. We need this badly and they should decide on it THIS YEAR.
  • private-iprivate-i Member PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    Just reposting this old article. I personally think we need both a new airport to replace NAIA while maintaining and further developing Clark Intl Airport.




    Phl needs 2 airports – JICA


    By Louella D. Desiderio (The Philippine Star) | Updated August 1, 2014 - 12:00am



    MANILA, Philippines - The Philippines will need to have two major airports to cater to the growing tourist traffic in the country, airport specialists said yesterday.

    Speaking at the Management Association of the Philippines (MAP) general membership meeting yesterday, Shizuo Iwata, project manager of Japan International Cooperation Agency’s Metro Manila Master Transportation Study and chairman of Almec Corp. said the country needs to develop both the Ninoy Aquino International Airport (NAIA) and Clark International Airport to cater to the rising number of travellers.

    “Clark and NAIA have different catchment areas. It is not a choice between Clark and NAIA. It is two airports we need. Clark will serve Central and Northern Luzon while NAIA will serve main metropolitan,” he said.

    He noted that while the Clark International Airport can still be expanded to meet an expected increase in number of tourists, the anticipated growth in tourists using NAIA will require the development of a new airport.


    Based on JICA’s study, the total number of passengers in the Clark catchment area will rise to 9.230 million by 2040 from 1.315 million in 2012.

    As for the NAIA catchment area, the total number of passengers is expected to hit 101.485 million by 2040 from 31.877 million in 2012.


    Iwata said the JICA has looked at eight candidate locations for the new NAIA but has picked Sangley Point in Cavite and Laguna de Bay as the best site based on catchment area, availability of land and future expansion, navigation risk due to mountain range, flooding and other natural hazard risks, wind speed and direction, accessibility, minimal risks of aircraft crash and noise problems and integrated urban development opportunity or value capture.

    Other sites considered were Angat-Pandi-Bustos (Bulacan), Obando (Bulacan), North Portion of Manila Bay (near Metro Manila and Bulacan boundaries), Central Portion of Manila Bay, San Nicolas Shoals, West Laguna Lake and Rizal – Talim Island.


    Iwata said the development of the new NAIA in Sangley Point is estimated to cost $11 billion and expected to be completed in 2025.

    “In the dream plan, as soon as new NAIA is open, we can close old NAIA,” he said noting that the old NAIA can become a central business district.

    In the same event, BenL Consulting International managing principal Ben Lao said the government must modernize NAIA and develop the Clark International Airport at the same time.

    He noted that just like other large cities in the world like Tokyo in Japan which have two airports Haneda and Narita, there is a need for a dual airport system here to plan for future growth.


    He said NAIA must be fixed to cater to an expected rise in number of passengers given the country’s highly educated English speaking and mobile population as well as the large number of citizens working and living abroad.

    “Clark is a gateway and it should be developed concurrently. To say that we will close NAIA and move it to Clark, as business people, residents living in this area, you will find it cumbersome to travel to Clark and Manila back and forth,” he said.

    As for developing a new airport, he said Sangley Point would be the right choice.


    “With NAIA and a new airport, I favor Sangley. Because of its geographical position, the Philippines is poised to be and should be the aviation hub in the Asia Pacific region and we must not waste time to do that. It means jobs, it means opportunities and alleviation of poverty, all of those things. Economic impact of aviation could be tremendous,” he said.

    For his part, Avelino Zapanta, Southeast Asian Airlines International Inc. president and chief executive officer and MAP’s national issues Committee member said he is pushing for a dual airports system as well, with NAIA to serve as a domestic hub and Clark as an international hub.


    http://www.philstar.com/business/2014/08/01/1352437/phl-needs-2-airports-jica
  • peterinpeterin Member PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    I vote for Clark. Build roads and rails instead of spending on reclamation.

    Sangley will be still too small even if a smaller reclamation can be done close to it. Building up on Bacoor Bay could be a good choice, but I would like to see a hub in Clark, a pritine melting pot for the Ilocandia, Ifugaos and others, a close by deep water Subic, Kapampangans and tagalogs of Central Luzon.

    Clark and its surrounding towns could be compared with a virgin forest of mega-city building. A great master plan could easily be drawn, for future generations.
  • ramblerrambler I wait for You, my Savior. PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    May nabasa ako nung isang araw na pananagutin ni Durterte yung mga mayors na hindi inaayos ang garbage problems sa mga lugar nila samantalang may discretionary funds naman silang natatanggap. I say, go go go!
  • ibarra28ibarra28 Member PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    It is very difficult to argue against a presentation by JICA. They are credible because they are apolotical. But since this is a public forum, allow me to make a case against the recommendation on Sangley.

    Typhoons Ondoy and Pedring were recent events still in the memory of many among us. Set aside the destruction it brought but focus solely on a phenomena that came with it--- STORM SURGE.

    Ondoy happened in 2009 and Pedring 2011. Before Ondoy, wala sa kamalayan ng tao ang storm surge. Then, di nagtagal naulit kay Pedring. Since then, PAGASA's typhoon warnings includes storm surge warnings as well.

    In layman's term ang storm surge as nangyayari pag may bagyo na kung saan tataas ang level ng dagat at babahain ang katabing lupain. But this is not a simple overflow. Dahil ito ay isang "surge", may dala itong malakas at mapanirang agos.

    The Philippines is a "typhoon corridor", add the fact that Ondoy and Pedring happened at opposite coastlines proves even more our vulnerability to storm surges.

    Given the above, we should reconsider the recommendation on Sangley or any location for that matter na tabing dagat-- either natural land mass or reclaimed.

    That Metro Manila needs 2 airports is agreeable. That the current NAIA be closed and replaced by a new one at another location has long been suggested. Pero dapat bang tabing dagat ang location ng bagong NAIA?

    Hindi naman mababago yung pagiging daanan natin ng bagyo na maaring magdala ng storm surge.

    private-i wrote: »
    Just reposting this old article. I personally think we need both a new airport to replace NAIA while maintaining and further developing Clark Intl Airport.




    Phl needs 2 airports – JICA


    By Louella D. Desiderio (The Philippine Star) | Updated August 1, 2014 - 12:00am



    MANILA, Philippines - The Philippines will need to have two major airports to cater to the growing tourist traffic in the country, airport specialists said yesterday.

    Speaking at the Management Association of the Philippines (MAP) general membership meeting yesterday, Shizuo Iwata, project manager of Japan International Cooperation Agency’s Metro Manila Master Transportation Study and chairman of Almec Corp. said the country needs to develop both the Ninoy Aquino International Airport (NAIA) and Clark International Airport to cater to the rising number of travellers.

    “Clark and NAIA have different catchment areas. It is not a choice between Clark and NAIA. It is two airports we need. Clark will serve Central and Northern Luzon while NAIA will serve main metropolitan,” he said.

    He noted that while the Clark International Airport can still be expanded to meet an expected increase in number of tourists, the anticipated growth in tourists using NAIA will require the development of a new airport.


    Based on JICA’s study, the total number of passengers in the Clark catchment area will rise to 9.230 million by 2040 from 1.315 million in 2012.

    As for the NAIA catchment area, the total number of passengers is expected to hit 101.485 million by 2040 from 31.877 million in 2012.


    Iwata said the JICA has looked at eight candidate locations for the new NAIA but has picked Sangley Point in Cavite and Laguna de Bay as the best site based on catchment area, availability of land and future expansion, navigation risk due to mountain range, flooding and other natural hazard risks, wind speed and direction, accessibility, minimal risks of aircraft crash and noise problems and integrated urban development opportunity or value capture.

    Other sites considered were Angat-Pandi-Bustos (Bulacan), Obando (Bulacan), North Portion of Manila Bay (near Metro Manila and Bulacan boundaries), Central Portion of Manila Bay, San Nicolas Shoals, West Laguna Lake and Rizal – Talim Island.


    Iwata said the development of the new NAIA in Sangley Point is estimated to cost $11 billion and expected to be completed in 2025.

    “In the dream plan, as soon as new NAIA is open, we can close old NAIA,” he said noting that the old NAIA can become a central business district.

    In the same event, BenL Consulting International managing principal Ben Lao said the government must modernize NAIA and develop the Clark International Airport at the same time.

    He noted that just like other large cities in the world like Tokyo in Japan which have two airports Haneda and Narita, there is a need for a dual airport system here to plan for future growth.


    He said NAIA must be fixed to cater to an expected rise in number of passengers given the country’s highly educated English speaking and mobile population as well as the large number of citizens working and living abroad.

    “Clark is a gateway and it should be developed concurrently. To say that we will close NAIA and move it to Clark, as business people, residents living in this area, you will find it cumbersome to travel to Clark and Manila back and forth,” he said.

    As for developing a new airport, he said Sangley Point would be the right choice.


    “With NAIA and a new airport, I favor Sangley. Because of its geographical position, the Philippines is poised to be and should be the aviation hub in the Asia Pacific region and we must not waste time to do that. It means jobs, it means opportunities and alleviation of poverty, all of those things. Economic impact of aviation could be tremendous,” he said.

    For his part, Avelino Zapanta, Southeast Asian Airlines International Inc. president and chief executive officer and MAP’s national issues Committee member said he is pushing for a dual airports system as well, with NAIA to serve as a domestic hub and Clark as an international hub.


    http://www.philstar.com/business/2014/08/01/1352437/phl-needs-2-airports-jica
  • deathzero23deathzero23 Member PExer
    Ah that "Storm Surge". It was a heated argument between the critics and Pag-Asa.
    Critics said Pag-Asa should've classified the phenomena as "Tsunami" so that everyone could relate and understand it.

    Pag-Asa, knowing them working in scientific-base environment people didn't welcome the critics' comments and stand by their ground (in the name of science) that Storm Surge is entirely different from a Tsunami.
    It was a battle of terminology usage which i think it's useless at that point.
  • netopiannetopian Member PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    Well I do hope this will be the start of the golden age of infrastructure as Diokno puts it. We are sooo way behind in transport and infrastructure! Napag-iwanan na talaga tayo ng ibang bansa. And a big thumbs up to Diokno's statement that all transportation and infrastructure projects will be done simultaneously and NOT sequentially!
  • netopiannetopian Member PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    Tugade to formalize Manila-Clark train plan in 90 days

    This is in relation to Transportation Secretary Arthur Tugade's request to airlines to transfer smaller turbo propeller planes to Clark airport

    Chrisee Dela Paz
    Published 8:00 PM, July 20, 2016
    Updated 8:25 PM, July 20, 2016



    cia-naia-alignment_F2B54220A8C849F3933E61006F7BB418.jpg
    CONNECTIVITY. The transportation department will provide Manila-Clark connectivity using a standard train or a connector road.



    MANILA, Philippines – With the Ninoy Aquino International Airport (NAIA) bursting at the seams, the transportation chief targets to finalize in 90 days his department's plans to build a standard train that will connect passengers from Manila to Clark International Airport.

    Transportation Secretary Arthur Tugade on Tuesday night, July 19, publicly asked for airlines' cooperation to transfer smaller turbo propeller planes to Clark airport.

    To make this viable, Tugade said his department will provide connectivity using a standard train or a connector road.

    "Clark will be reachable either by road or by train. By road, we have to recognize [Metro Manila] Skyway [Stage] 3 and the Connector Road because that will bring you somewhere in Bulacan, so it gives connectivity," Tugade said during the networking event organized by World Trade Center Manila in Pasay City.

    The Skyway 3 deal is an elevated expressway from Buendia in Makati City to Balintawak in Quezon City.

    Meanwhile, the Metro Pacific group’s North Luzon Expressway (NLEX) and South Luzon Expressway (SLEX) Connector Road project will link Circumferencial Road 3 in Caloocan City and Skyway 3.

    "Connectivity using the train, we will do that by using Philippine National Railways (PNR) alignment or those of the NLEX. One thing I want to do is a standard train," Tugade said.

    He added that the rail project is being studied by the National Economic and Development Authority, and will be formalized by his department in 90 days.

    On Monday, July 18, a NAIA runway was temporarily closed for the repair of a 5-inch deep crack on the asphalt overlay, leading to 28 flight diversions and at least 40 cancelled flights.

    A lesson learned

    "Although it was irritatingly painful, it was also a learning experience. We will not allow for it to happen again," Tugade told some business leaders.

    To help decongest NAIA, Tugade said businessmen Lucio Tan and Lance Gokongwei last week agreed to move their helicopters out of NAIA.

    The transportation chief then asked local airline executives present at the forum to transfer all their turboprop aircraft to the Clark International Airport from NAIA.

    "I will also be requesting the airlines. I hope I'm not preempting the meeting being arranged. I am asking for them to transfer all their turbo props in Clark," Tugade said.

    On the sidelines of the event, Philippine Airlines president Jaime Bautista said his airline will study Tugade's proposal.

    "We are studying its impact to our passengers. Turbo props coming from far-flung places will do. But if it's coming from nearby places like Masbate, they won't ride with us na. We will work with them," Bautista said after the briefing.

    The transportation department's other initiatives to decongest NAIA include regulating general aviation during peak hours and equipping airports with night-rated capabilities.

    NAIA has been above its handling capacity of 28 million passengers annually. In 2015, passenger arrivals surged to 50,210. – Rappler.com

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