FEATURE ADJUSTMENT: The Flag button is temporarily unavailable for members. We are doing certain system adjustments as of the moment to prevent some users from abusing this feature. For reports, please message the moderators or email us at [email protected]
PEx Alert: Welcome to the new PinoyExchange. For access issues, bug reports and technical concerns, please email us at [email protected] Thank you!

How do they teach in UP? How do students learn in UP?

I'm currently studying (BS Biology) in a different university, but I'm curious how students are being taught in UP and what teaching techniques they apply in UP that sets them apart, possibly make them better than other universities.

For example in my university, our professors aside from giving us detailed discussions they also provide us all the learning materials (which are all we need to pass the subject) kind of like a "spoon-fed" manner. I'm wondering if they also apply this teaching technique in bigger schools like UP, or if not how do they do it.

Comments

  • KasinamaneKasinamane Member ✭✭
    It depends on the professor and the field.

    In the social sciences, most professors would provide relevant readings to be discussed on class. Very few would actually hand out these readings and you would have to either search for them online or go to the photocopy stations where they're left. However, for research papers often required to pass the subjects, you are definitely expected to find sources outside of the required readings.

    In the sciences, professors would hand out modules with practice problems. Supplementary exercises are given as needed. However, since you are expected to demonstrate a higher form of critical inquiry, most exams would definitely be a more advanced application of the practice problems.
  • levinikeelevinikee A pretty awesome guy.
    In addition to what was said above, most social science courses also fieldwork to complete the degree program. In Anthropology and Linguistics, for instance, students are required to immerse themselves for at least a month in a community as their "OJT".

    Also, some classes in the arts and humanities have a guided discussion-esque style of teaching, where active critical student participation is required (and always fulfilled) to further the discussion.

    I often here this in the university: Other schools spoon-feed their students. In UP, the spoon is hidden from us. :lol:

Leave a Comment

BoldItalicStrikethroughOrdered listUnordered list
Emoji
Image
Align leftAlign centerAlign rightToggle HTML viewToggle full pageToggle lights
Drop image/file