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Sully (Starring Tom Hanks)

forgforg Administrator PEx Moderator
FILMING TAKES OFF ON CLINT EASTWOOD'S “SULLY,” TOM HANKS STARS
via press release

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Production is underway on Warner Bros. Pictures’ drama “Sully,” starring Oscar winner Tom Hanks (upcoming “Bridge of Spies,” “Captain Phillips,” “Forrest Gump”) as Captain Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger, under the direction of Oscar winner Clint Eastwood (“American Sniper,” “Million Dollar Baby”).

On January 15, 2009, the world witnessed the “Miracle on the Hudson” when Captain “Sully” Sullenberger (Hanks) glided his disabled plane onto the frigid waters of the Hudson River, saving the lives of all 155 aboard. However, even as Sully was being heralded by the public and the media for his unprecedented feat of aviation skill, an investigation was unfolding that threatened to destroy his reputation and his career.
“Sully” also stars Aaron Eckhart (“Olympus Has Fallen,” “The Dark Knight”) as Sully’s co-pilot, Jeff Skiles, and Oscar nominee Laura Linney (“The Savages,” “Kinsey”) as Sully’s wife, Lorraine Sullenberger.

Eastwood is directing the film from a screenplay by Todd Komarnicki, based on the book Highest Duty: My Search for What Really Matters, by Sullenberger and Jeffrey Zaslow. The project is being produced by Eastwood, Frank Marshall, Allyn Stewart and Tim Moore, with Kipp Nelson serving as executive producer.

The film reunites Eastwood with several of his longtime collaborators, who most recently worked with the director on the worldwide hit “American Sniper”: director of photography Tom Stern and production designer James J. Murakami, who were both Oscar-nominated for their work on “The Changeling”; costume designer Deborah Hopper; and editor Blu Murray.

Principal photography began on Monday, September 28, in New York, where the water landing that instantly made Sully a household name was achieved. Filming will also take place in North Carolina, Atlanta and Los Angeles.

A Malpaso, Flashlight Films, Kennedy/Marshall Company production, “Sully” will be distributed worldwide by Warner Bros. Pictures, a Warner Bros. Entertainment Company.

Comments

  • BeerhandBopBeerhandBop PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    does this needed to be made?

    he made an emergency landing - big whoop.

    parang air asia lang na nag overshoot ng runway sa kalibo
  • forgforg Administrator PEx Moderator
    UNTOLD STORY ABOUT MIRACLE LANDING IN FIRST TRAILER OF “SULLY”
    via press release

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    The first trailer for Warner Bros. Pictures' real-life airborne thriller “Sully” has just taken off and may be viewed below. The Tom Hanks-starrer opens in Philippine cinemas on September 8th.

    From Oscar-winning director Clint Eastwood comes Warner Bros. Pictures’ “Sully,” starring Oscar winner Tom Hanks as Captain Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger.

    On January 15, 2009, the world witnessed the “Miracle on the Hudson” when Captain “Sully” Sullenberger glided his disabled plane onto the frigid waters of the Hudson River, saving the lives of all 155 aboard. However, even as Sully was being heralded by the public and the media for his unprecedented feat of aviation skill, an investigation was unfolding that threatened to destroy his reputation and his career.
    “Sully” also stars Aaron Eckhart as Sully’s co-pilot, Jeff Skiles, and Oscar nominee Laura Linney as Sully’s wife, Lorraine Sullenberger.

    Eastwood is directing the film from a screenplay by Todd Komarnicki, based on the book Highest Duty by Sullenberger and Jeffrey Zaslow. The project is being produced by Eastwood, Frank Marshall, Allyn Stewart and Tim Moore, with Kipp Nelson and Bruce Berman serving as executive producers.
    The film reunites Eastwood with several of his longtime collaborators, who most recently worked with the director on the worldwide hit “American Sniper”: director of photography Tom Stern and production designer James J. Murakami, who were both Oscar-nominated for their work on “The Changeling”; costume designer Deborah Hopper; and editor Blu Murray.

    Warner Bros. Pictures presents, in association with Village Roadshow Pictures, a Flashlight Films production, a Kennedy/Marshall Company production, a Malpaso production, “Sully.” The film will be distributed worldwide by Warner Bros. Pictures, a Warner Bros. Entertainment Company.
  • forgforg Administrator PEx Moderator
    “SULLY” FILMED ENTIRELY WITH IMAX CAMERAS FOR STUNNING CLARITY, SCALE
    via press release

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    A miracle landing deserves an epic-scale shooting. That's why director Clint Eastwood has chosen to film Warner Bros. Pictures' “Sully” – the airborne thriller based on true events -- almost entirely with new ALEXA IMAX® 65mm cameras.

    As a result, audiences will see the so-called `miracle on the Hudson' depicted in stunning clarity.
    And exclusively in IMAX® theatres, “Sully” will be presented in an expanded IMAX 1.9:1 aspect ratio and fill more of the IMAX screen – offering moviegoers 26% more of the image than standard cinemas for a truly immersive experience.

    “Sully” stars Oscar winner Tom Hanks as Captain Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger.

    On January 15, 2009, the world witnessed the “Miracle on the Hudson” when Captain “Sully” Sullenberger glided his disabled plane onto the frigid waters of the Hudson River, saving the lives of all 155 aboard. However, even as Sully was being heralded by the public and the media for his unprecedented feat of aviation skill, an investigation was unfolding that threatened to destroy his reputation and his career.
    “Sully” also stars Aaron Eckhart as Sully’s co-pilot, Jeff Skiles, and Oscar nominee Laura Linney as Sully’s wife, Lorraine Sullenberger.

    Eastwood is directing the film from a screenplay by Todd Komarnicki, based on the book Highest Duty by Sullenberger and Jeffrey Zaslow.

    The ALEXA IMAX 65mm camera that Eastwood used in filming “Sully” is a next-generation revolutionary 2D digital camera developed through a partnership between ARRI and IMAX for use by today's leading filmmakers working in the IMAX® format. The camera, when combined with IMAX’s digital re-mastering process, delivers the highest level of digital image capture and playback resulting in stunning lifelike images with pristine clarity, incredibly fine detail, vivid colors and a higher dynamic range for superior contrast.

    Most films today are presented in an aspect ratio called CinemaScope (2.40:1). When a film is presented in CinemaScope, it is cropped and uses only part of the image the movie camera captures. This is the reason most ordinary screens are very wide but not particularly high.

    With “Sully,” IMAX provided Eastwood with the ability to use an expanded aspect ratio for the film's IMAX presentation during production through filming with the extremely high-resolution IMAX® camera.

    Opening across the Philippines on Thursday, Sept. 08 in IMAX and regular cinemas,“Sully” is distributed worldwide by Warner Bros. Pictures, a Warner Bros. Entertainment Company.
  • forgforg Administrator PEx Moderator
    CLINT EASTWOOD HAS UNIQUE PERSONAL CONNECTION WITH “SULLY”
    via press release

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    A story few people are aware of—one director Clint Eastwood himself may have long ago forgotten, but which connects him in a unique way with the subject matter of “Sully” —came to light when working on the film.

    As a young man of 21 in the Army, Eastwood was a passenger on a Navy plane, “catching a free flight from Seattle down to Alameda,” he relates. “It was stormy and we went down off of Point Reyes, California, in the Pacific, and I found myself in the water, swimming a few miles toward shore, thinking, ‘Well, 21’s not as long as a person wants to live.’”

    Producer, and Eastwood’s longtime production manager, Tim Moore states, “What’s remarkable is that Clint remembers exactly how the landing was—that the back end went down and they had to get out pretty fast because they thought it was going to sink quickly, and they just started swimming. While I don’t think that was a factor in picking this film, I think the commonalities brought back a lot of memories; it’s certainly interesting that this project found its way to him.”

    Though he doesn’t equate his experience with that of the passengers and crew on flight 1549, it did provide a certain perspective for one preparing to direct Sully’s story. “I suppose having been in a similar situation,” Eastwood surmises, “as a pilot I would have chanced a water landing rather than go someplace there’s no runway.”

    In the film, moments after takeoff from New York’s LaGuardia Airport, a flock of birds strikes US Airways flight 1549, taking out both engines at only 2800 feet and causing an immediate, forced water landing. It is, we will learn, unprecedented. “No one has ever trained for an incident like that,” notes Tom Hanks, speaking as the titular Captain Chesley Sullenberger in “Sully.”

    Recounting the real events that took place on that cold day in January 2009, the film also explores their very real aftermath. The plane carried 150 passengers and five crew members, yet not a single life was lost—not in the air, not in the water. But as “Sully” reveals, in the days following what quickly came to be known as the Miracle on the Hudson, the pilot with a record of proficiency, years of experience, and calm in the face of potential catastrophe, would be called upon repeatedly to defend his actions to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB).
    It was that part of the story, the one the world didn’t know, that drew Eastwood to the project. “Anybody who keeps their wits about them when things are going wrong, who can negotiate the problems without panicking, is someone of superior character and interesting to watch on film. But for me, the real conflict came after, with the investigative board questioning his decisions even though he’d saved so many lives.”

    “I’m not an aviator,” says Hanks, “but I know you’re not supposed to be able to make a landing like that. This was a very pragmatic man who understood the realities of what he’d done and what it meant. He will never say he’s a hero, but knowing with confidence that he could make that landing? That was a heroic thing he did. And he paid a price for it.”
    That cost was exacted both during the day, when he and his co-pilot, Jeff Skiles, were being interrogated by the investigative board, and at night, when Sully was haunted by nightmares about what could have happened—what very well might have happened—had he turned that plane around in search of a less watery airfield.

    “It was the least bad option,” the man himself, Capt. Sullenberger, states. Having lost thrust in both engines of the A320, he quickly determined that the Hudson River, which runs between New Jersey and Manhattan’s West Side, was their best bet. “There was nowhere else in the entire New York Metropolitan area long enough, wide enough, or smooth enough to land an airliner.”

    Opening across the Philippines on Thursday, Sept. 08 in IMAX and regular cinemas,“Sully” is distributed worldwide by Warner Bros. Pictures, a Warner Bros. Entertainment Company.
  • gotta lick itgotta lick it PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    pang-OSCARS ba ito?
  • forgforg Administrator PEx Moderator
    ^ just came home from the press screening and I think it has a shot for a nomination. It's good, subtle start but delivers a solid punch towards the end.
  • forgforg Administrator PEx Moderator
    AARON ECKHART PLAYS “SULLY'S” CO-PILOT IN INSPIRING FILM
    via press release

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    Joining Tom Hanks on the flight deck in Warner Bros. Pictures' “Sully”, Aaron Eckhart (“The Dark Knight,” “Olympus Has Fallen”) took on the role of the titular character's co-pilot Jeff Skiles.

    On January 15, 2009, the world witnessed the “Miracle on the Hudson” when Captain “Sully” Sullenberger (Hanks) glided his disabled plane onto the frigid waters of the Hudson River, saving the lives of all 155 aboard. However, even as Sully was being heralded by the public and the media for his unprecedented feat of aviation skill, an investigation was unfolding that threatened to destroy his reputation and his career.

    Eckhart says he was very affected by the screenplay for “Sully.” “It was structured beautifully, because from the time they took off to the time they hit the birds was three and a half minutes. How do you make a whole movie about that? But it was very emotional and managed to build tension throughout the story, showing the audience what went on for these two men who were, to the outside world, hailed as heroes. I think it’s a heroic story, with good lessons to be learned.”

    To prepare for the scenes that depict those critical moments in the air, the real Sullenberger had explained to Hanks and Eckhart his own process at the time. His first three thoughts—all within mere seconds—had covered disbelief, denial, and realization. He told them that those thoughts led to three clear actions: force himself to be calm, set clear priorities, and manage the workload, not trying to do too much, but doing what they could to solve the problems, one by one, in the small amount of time they had. Hanks and Eckhart would have to internalize the intellectual elements of that progression and then show exactly how, having accepted what they were dealing with, Sully and Skiles were able to land the plane.

    What most people might be unaware of, just as these two actors were prior to the project, is that Sully and Skiles, who worked together like a well-oiled machine, had met for the first time just a few days before the flight—a common occurrence considering the thousands of pilots traversing the globe at any given time. Fortunately their training allows them to communicate effortlessly and assist each other when there isn’t time to talk everything out.

    Prior to filming, Eckhart contacted Skiles as well. Recalling their conversation, Skiles says, “We spoke for a couple of hours and he asked me a lot of questions about being a pilot, not just why I wanted to be one but also why I continue to do so after that day.”

    “Jeff told me that first and foremost, they were always in control of the flight; they felt they could make a good landing, a controlled landing, in the Hudson,” Eckhart says. “He also talked about the effect going through that trauma had on them afterward: stress, lack of sleep, loss of appetite, nervousness, that sort of thing. It lasted two or three months and they got counseling. And he’s still flying today; he’s a captain himself now.”

    Eckhart was also able to strongly resemble his counterpart in both appearance and manner. Producer Frank Marshall felt the production was very lucky in that “there were two really interesting guys in the cockpit when this happened. Sully is a more reserved, quieter guy, and Jeff Skiles is pretty funny. And Aaron brought a sort of lightheartedness to what we see in the film is a very heavy situation. It’s nice to see the dynamic between the two real men played out by Tom and Aaron so well.”

    “Tom’s an extraordinary actor,” Eckhart adds. “He’s so in command, it’s effortless. I’d like to think working with him had an effect on me; I’d like to learn some of his tricks.”

    Opening across the Philippines on Thursday, Sept. 08 in IMAX and regular cinemas,“Sully” is distributed worldwide by Warner Bros. Pictures, a Warner Bros. Entertainment Company.
  • forgforg Administrator PEx Moderator
    “SULLY” – A ROLE TOM HANKS CANNOT PASS UP
    via press release


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    Three years ago, he played the real-life titular character “Captain Phillips” to critical acclaim and box-office success. Now, two-time Oscar-winner Tom Hanks portrays another true-to-life person – Captain Chesley Sullenberger, the hero of the so-called Miracle-on-the-Hudson landing – in Warner Bros. Pictures' “Sully.”

    The Captain “Sully” the world has come to know in recent history began flying at the age of 14, “as soon as he was tall enough to see outside the cockpit of the plane,” quips Tom Hanks. The young pilot then attended the United States Air Force Academy and flew fighter jets in the service for five years, attaining the rank of captain, before taking the controls of a commercial airliner. “The life of a professional aviator,” the actor continues. “If he tallied it up, I think he’d have something like 20,000 hours as the guy in charge of the plane. That’s a lot of take-offs and landings, a lot of looking at gauges to see if anything is wrong, and a few hairy moments here and there in the course of a career.”

    But nothing like what he faced in those 208 seconds that would come to represent the culmination of his life’s experiences. Pilots work hard to prepare for any circumstances they could face in the air, and suddenly Sully was faced with the challenge of his career. “A flock of geese got sucked into the engines and boom! he was essentially flying a powerless glider with 155 souls on board—his included. It’s a good thing he had those 20,000 hours of experience behind him,” Hanks offers.

    The role of Sully was one the always-in-demand Hanks couldn’t turn down, despite having to postpone a well-earned break. “Sometimes you read something that is so stirring and at the same time so simple, such a perfect blend of behavior and procedure,” he reflects. “Now, I’m as competitive as the next actor, so I knew I wanted at least a shot at it, even though I’d been working pretty steadily for about six years. Sure I was beat but, not unlike a solid jolt of adrenaline, this role, Sully, Mr. Clint Eastwood…they all came along. I felt like I couldn’t pass up a chance at playing in this great double-header at the end of this long baseball season.”

    Although the two had never worked together before, Eastwood says, “Tom was one of the first people we thought about for the part. But at the time he was just finishing a picture and we didn’t think we could get him. But he read the script and liked it and made himself available. And he was terrific, a consummate pro, and it was kind of effortless working with him.”

    The filmmakers also appreciated what Hanks brought to the shoot when the cameras weren’t rolling. Offers Eastwood, “He has a great sense of humor, so that makes it fun. He’d be standing around waiting, sometimes in the rain, and still making the crew laugh.”

    Despite his easygoing demeanor on set, Hanks admits that when playing a real person “you’re always intimidated. You say to yourself, ‘I’ll never sound like him, I’ll never look like him. Hopefully I can embody some aspect, capture some part of his personality, his characteristics, his gravitas, his charm,’ whomever the person may be. And then you go to work.”
    The subject of Hanks’ portrayal had no qualms about the actor stepping into his shoes. “Besides the fact that they were making a movie, directed by such a gifted storyteller as Clint Eastwood, to then have Tom Hanks playing me…it’s a dream team,” says the real Captain Chesley Sullenberger. “I know Tom is someone who can transform himself, but the first time I saw a long-range shot of him in costume, with his hair colored? Wow. It was amazing.”

    Opening across the Philippines on Thursday, Sept. 08 in IMAX and regular cinemas,“Sully” is distributed worldwide by Warner Bros. Pictures, a Warner Bros. Entertainment Company.
  • bolickylickybolickylicky Member PEx Expert 🎖️
    has anyone seen this yet?
  • sH3ilasH3ila PEx Rookie ⭐
    loved it! loved the non-linear storytelling. tom hanks was brilliant here. its a slow burn, but its the kind of movie that draws you in on the story and ends with a punch.
  • gotta lick itgotta lick it PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    has anyone seen this yet?

    back read na lang





    has anyonne read the book 'Highest Duty' and compare it to the movie?
    Eastwood is notorious in changing the book plots just to make a great movie.
  • scout_yellowscout_yellow PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    The movie was okay, it was well-made and well-acted, as expected. It was interesting to know what happened behind all the hero story about the pilot of the Miracle on Hudson River. Never thought there would be an issue about his decision to land on the Hudson given the circumstance. I didn't really follow the story during its news coverage but I remember that it was a big deal.

    Overall, it was a good watch. *okay*
  • sigh_hwatalyfsigh_hwatalyf PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    i liked it. i like movies that build up to a climax. the story gets more and more gripping until the end
  • AquamanAquaman PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    Its interesting how bird strikes doesn't happen more often.
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