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"Rumors of War" - Debunking WTC and terrorism hoaxes

My favorite urban legend hunters, the Snopes, have put up a "Rumors of War" page, devoted to rumors and myths rising out of the 9/11 attacks and subsequent developments. Check it out before anyone posts any more Nostradamus / Satan's face / candle-for-a-satellite-photo topics. :D

http://www.snopes.com/info/rumors.htm

Comments

  • sa manila lang ang maliwanag pag gabi....:lol:
  • brownpau thanks for being pro-active.
  • its just so sad to know that some people could actually do and spread this so called "rumors of war". gamitin ba daw yung tradegy sa america.

    hay nako, what a cruel world we have ... i wish people would just stop sending these emails ...
  • One wonders if some of those rumors of war were started out as propaganda from Bin Laden's group. For example, those news about 4,000 Jews reportedly opting not to go to work on the WTC on the day of the attack, or that CNN was showing decades old footages of the Palestinian's celebration on the streets after the WTC attack.

    The problem with the internet is that information can be relayed so fast to so many people that it can be used as a very effective propaganda tool, at least for a period of time. Here at PEx, for example. If I'm not mistaken, it's been almost 2 weeks before the correct information about those CNN footages came out. So, in that period of 2 weeks, you have people like me believing that indeed, CNN had done something terribly wrong. Situations like this can be dangerous. Someone, somewhere out there will eventually find a way to use it effectively to do some real harm to people or institutions.

    The best thing for people like us to do is just rely on major news organizations for reports, where we can be reasonably assured that the news has been verified as facts first before relaying it to us. If the reports come from just e-mail messages, 95% of the time it'll turn out to be some sort of a hoax.

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