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Benefits if using Bamboo at Home

Hi everyone! Does anyone use any bamboo products at home? My family is slowly renovating our house to make it more eco-friendly and one of the architects suggested to make use of bamboo as blinds and flooring!

Here's why you should consider using bamboo for your house:
1. It is highly sustainable and renewable.
2. Actually very durable.
3. Inexpensive!
4. Bamboos are generally easy to find.

But on the other hand, my mom is not so convinced about bamboo because she still somehow thinks that our house should be made of the traditional cement and what if the workers don't know how to use bamboo? Uh-oh.

So does anyone of you also use bamboo at home?

Here's a great article about the use of bamboo at homes by the way. It's worth checking out!

(http://www.mycartoonprofile.com/benefits-of-using-bamboo-at-home/)

Comments

  • cyberfunkcyberfunk PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    All is well with the enumerated qualities except one. Bamboo flooring is as expensive as hardwood floor. Being sustainable and renewable is plausible as long as you will use bamboo in it's natural state. But to use it for floors or laminate it does need a very tedious manufacturing process. It will require a large amount of carbon footprint from the harvesting down to the manufacturing or engineering process.

    Environmentally, Bamboo engineering products is like owning a Toyota Prius. It's just symbolic and a very expensive gesture.

    Aesthetically, with the "green" bandwagon on full swing it is hip and cool. But like any fad we better be cautious of using it because sooner or later it will be dated.
  • kapopoy2010kapopoy2010 PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    Cyberfunk raises some good points. Organic and natural seems more expensive. The key is to lower cost while achieving our ecological aims. The problem is, we're still a ways off
  • great2findgreat2find PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    I would rather use bamboo extensively on my rooftop garden......
  • cyberfunkcyberfunk PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    China is churning processed bamboo in a very fast phase with the help of the "green" profiteering campaign. Just be careful buying stuff obviously taking advantage of the concerns of the environment. To make bamboo tougher is to uses binders or resins and most of these are carcinogenic like formaldehyde.

    Bamboo, technically is a grass and grows to maturity quickly in just a couple or years. Hence, they say it's sustainable but if that's the case then why is it more expensive? So there's a lot of things going on from where they grow it to the finish product for the end market.
  • rendakurendaku PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    Use of bamboo in a modern structure is just fad; bamboo gives very limited aesthetic value and practically no structural value in a modern house. The limited aesthetic value (and you have to really find out what to do with it) and the short and redundant conversation that it can encourage as a piece are not worth the problems and additonal labor cost working with it might entail.

    Bamboo is for bahay-kubo, lechon and barbecue stick.
  • Dati bamboo blinds tsaka bamboo divider nasa room ko kasi trip ko yung ganung style, napansin ko lang, papalitan mo siya every year, pag maulan na may parang molds na natubo dun sa bamboo. Ke yung mahal na klase yan na nabibili sa tiendesitas or yung sa tabi-tabi lang dun samen sa probinsya, madali pa din maluma (moldy).

    Ngayon gamit na lang namin sa bamboo eh improvised fencing para dun sa mga bagong tanim na seedling :)
  • Add ko lang pala, hindi naman nababasa yung bamboo blinds ko dati, sarado naman bintana ko dahil madalas aircon ako, pero ganun talaga pag masyadong malamig yung weather naging moldy talaga yung blinds. Akala ko dati dumi lang pinasadahan ko ng vacuum, wala din nangyari.
  • I would like to be able to just pop into a store in Metro Manila (not in the provinces) and buy 1/2" or 3/4" engineered bamboo plywood and 1 or 2 x engineered bamboo lumber which is locally made (not coming from China or India, etc.) as easily as we now buy conventional plywood and lumber. In future, for as cheap if not cheaper than conventional plywood and lumber ... but for now, willing to pay higher price.

    Is this possible now? If so, may we know the store?

    I hope Philippine government/private/processing technology can get its act together to make this happen -- easy availability and competitive price of local engineered bamboo. How many years will it take? Anyone here in the know or in the bamboo industry and can venture a prediction, hopeful or otherwise?
  • rendakurendaku PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    Add ko lang pala, hindi naman nababasa yung bamboo blinds ko dati, sarado naman bintana ko dahil madalas aircon ako, pero ganun talaga pag masyadong malamig yung weather naging moldy talaga yung blinds. Akala ko dati dumi lang pinasadahan ko ng vacuum, wala din nangyari.

    Around November I bought these pot mats which are made of cross-cut sections of bamboo about 1/4 inch thick stringed together to form a mat about 7"x7." Sandali ko pa lang nagamit and after a few days and dami na niyang amag (molds) halos namumuti na siya doon sa sabitan niya. Yung ibang utensils wala namang amag at wala naman amag sa kitchen. I cleaned it the mats and heated them over the stove partially scorching it to destroy the mold spores. Pero, lo and behold, after a few days, the amag is back. I cleaned them again, dried them under the sun and sprayed them with two coatings of clear lacquer pylox. Solved!--hindi na ulit inamag. :D

    I am actually interested not in merely using them as pot mat but in assembling an entire mosaic curtain of these square mats. They are cheap but very decorative and refreshing to look at. :D
  • rendakurendaku PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    agave wrote: »
    I would like to be able to just pop into a store in Metro Manila (not in the provinces) and buy 1/2" or 3/4" engineered bamboo plywood and 1 or 2 x engineered bamboo lumber which is locally made (not coming from China or India, etc.) as easily as we now buy conventional plywood and lumber. In future, for as cheap if not cheaper than conventional plywood and lumber ... but for now, willing to pay higher price.

    Is this possible now? If so, may we know the store?

    I hope Philippine government/private/processing technology can get its act together to make this happen -- easy availability and competitive price of local engineered bamboo. How many years will it take? Anyone here in the know or in the bamboo industry and can venture a prediction, hopeful or otherwise?

    What I can see is the possibility of extruding building materials with a machine that combines bamboo fiber embedded in thermoplastic, or perhaps bamboo strips embedded in resin bath to form planks or beams.

    This could be sustainable considering the recycling property of thermoplastics and the cheap cost of manufacturing synthetic resin.
  • rendaku wrote: »
    What I can see is the possibility of extruding building materials with a machine that combines bamboo fiber embedded in thermoplastic, or perhaps bamboo strips embedded in resin bath to form planks or beams.

    This could be sustainable considering the recycling property of thermoplastics and the cheap cost of manufacturing synthetic resin.

    Interesting idea, you mean like the way rebar is embedded in concrete, to provide the tensile strength?

    Don't know much about plastics ... can that be a DIY or small-scale thing?

    As for epoxy, did a quick calculation:
    One gallon (parts A+B) would be a little over P1,000 (wishful, but just for baseline).
    1 gal = 3.785 L = 3,785 mL = 3,785 cu.cm = 231 cu.in.
    So epoxy costs P1,000/231 = P4.329/cu.in
    One 'board foot' of epoxy would be P4.329 x 12 x 12 = P623.

    Ouch. Am I missing something. At that price, might as well use imported/exotic hardwood! :eek:
  • rendakurendaku PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    agave wrote: »
    Interesting idea, you mean like the way rebar is embedded in concrete, to provide the tensile strength?

    Don't know much about plastics ... can that be a DIY or small-scale thing?

    As for epoxy, did a quick calculation:
    One gallon (parts A+B) would be a little over P1,000 (wishful, but just for baseline).
    1 gal = 3.785 L = 3,785 mL = 3,785 cu.cm = 231 cu.in.
    So epoxy costs P1,000/231 = P4.329/cu.in
    One 'board foot' of epoxy would be P4.329 x 12 x 12 = P623.

    Ouch. Am I missing something. At that price, might as well use imported/exotic hardwood! :eek:

    Yes to your first statement--like a reinforced or pre-stressed concrete--the bamboo fiber being the deformed bars and the epoxy the concrete aggregate.

    But I was thinking into the future AND in industrial scale--not in the parameters of home DIY, which obviously, much like creating a prototype, would not benefit from economies of scale and would be hardly sustainable.

    The process, however, may be feasible as well as sustainable if mass-produced at large-scale considering the availability of materials and the growing market for alternative building components.
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