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University Rankings in Asia

Hey guys,

I'm not sure if this topic is relevant to the UAAP but since you all are having such a heated discussion about how good your schools are, check out www.asiaweek.com and click on the "Top Universities in Asia" icon and check out for yourselves what the magazine thought. The four universities from the Phil. who made the list are from the UAAP. Batang Uliran posted this address in another topic in this forum.

Be nice to each other.

Peace.
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Comments

  • De La Salle University-Manila is still the most reputable private university in the South-East Asia!!! And that's all I got to say about that!!! (not being bias) But that's the whole truth.
  • De La Salle University-Manila is still the most reputable private university next to PWU and PCU in the
    South-East of Manila, including Taft Avenue, even better than Benilde!!! And that's all I got to say about that!!! (not being bias) But that's
    the whole truth.

    [This message has been edited by greeneagle (edited 08-11-1999).]
  • Ayos! Isa na namang forum kung saan mag-aaway! If you're sick of the fights in "Of Recruitment and La Salle" and "La Salle-Ateneo Rivalry", there's a fresh new forum waiting for you, guys.

    Great going, Kaboom! It's not related to the UAAP, but what the hey, it's fun to see everyone going at it.

    Nice to see you taking the first cheap shot, greeneagle. How typical. Of you. And for your info, La Salle is in SOUTH-WEST MANILA. East of Roxas Boulevard, maybe, but still SOUTH-WEST MANILA. Get your geography straight, mister.

    LLLET'S GET RRREADY TO RRRUMMMBLE!!!
  • archerguyarcherguy PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    De La Salle University is the highest rated private university in the ASEAN region in terms of ACADEMIC REPUTATION!!!!
    ********************************************
    Personally, I really think that Kaboom! shouldn't have posted this topic, 'coz we all know that it will certainly lead to a heated discussion. Even though the Philippine universities that made it to Asiaweek's list are all UAAP members, I don't think it is connected with Athletics, which is what the UAAP stands for. Besides, many have questioned Asiaweek's claim that it has become an "authority" when it comes to ranking the best universities in the region, because like what the University of Tokyo(the holder of the Top 1 for two years but eventually withdrew from this survey) ,together with Stanford University said,
    "We are extremely skeptical that the quality of a university...can me measured statistically." I also think that excellence cannot be quantified. So I really think that this discussion shouldn't be promoted. My opinion only.




  • PIPOL:

    I really hope you don't forget that if you all are as ill-mannered as what you manifest in this forum, then it clearly shows that no matter how good the reputation of your school is, or no matter what ranking your school is at, if the students or the graduates are like you guys, SAYANG!

    Remember this:

    Kahit anong galing at prestige ng school mo, kung ikaw ay nagpaparang taga-kanto at walang pinag-aralan, wag mo ng ipagsigawan na galing ka sa eskwelahan na yon, dahil tiyak na kinahihiya ka lang ng eskwelahan mo dahil sa pag-uugaling ipinapakita mo, ok.

    If you have so much hate for another school, keep it to yourself, unless you wanna ruin your schools good reputation.

    I believe this forum was not meant to make you guys feel more competitive against other schools.

    Take care. :)
  • I don't know..lists are lists and rankings
    are subjective. Besides, Japan leads Asia
    in suicides once again..a 17.2 per 100,000,
    and a great number of them were students.
    My point is..school is more than academics.
    ..and I'm pretty sure 'War & Peace' reads
    the same way where ever it is you attend
    school.
    I'll take our system anyday.
    Peace
  • Hello to all...!!!

    alam niyo... this topic will just promote
    anger and "war" sa mga schools...
    imbis na mag-promote ng friendship and comeraderie.... tsk tsk tsk...

    its a pitty that such topic should be posted!
  • batang uliranbatang uliran PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    Jeremy:

    I think we've been slugging it out verbally way before this topic was started ;)

    As some of you have pointed out, this is just a list but lists are not really new - witness Business Week's ranking of the top Business schools in the US, or US News and World Report's ranking of the top US Universities in many different fields. Or closer to home, Asia Magazine's ranking of the best MBA programs in Asia (AIM has consistently been among the top 5). Like it or not, these lists are here to stay and I think do a pretty good job. Like all of you, I love my alma mater (UP) because it has made me the person I am today. I think this list is some objective measure of how 4 UAAP member schools stack up based on certain criteria set aside by Asiaweek. Could they have considered other criteria? Surely! Kaboom, myself, and even the magazine's editors I'm sure don't think this ranking is perfect. There will always be flaws to this kind of ranking but let's look at it as a starting point to see where we can improve further and move up the list in future rankings. It does neither us nor our schools any good to pretend we are the best when the truth of the matter is, there's a lot of work to be done to make any of our alma maters truly world class in all respects.



    [This message has been edited by batang uliran (edited 08-12-1999).]
  • The below the belt potshots against each other's schools in this forum definitely haven't been constructive to anybody. I do like the fact that most are very loyal and proud of their institutions.

    I graduated from a school (Northwestern Univeristy) that took rankings very seriously, especially if there's some credibility to how the rankings were obtained. Like Batang Uliran mentioned, there will never be a perfect system to find out who really is the best but you can look at lists as indicators. The higher the school was ranked, the better the students who applied and more professors wanted to teach there.

    It seems that those who are most critical of the rankings are those who are at the bottom of the list or don't do well. When I was a freshman (not that long ago) my school was ranked 12 in the US and praised the US News & World Report rankings. But my sophomore year, they dropped to 23 and school officials called the list stupid or insignificant. But the school really worked hard at it and did everything they can to get back to the elite list so that they can once again attract the best people. Now NU consistently hovers around the top 10 of the list and it's helped the school remain world class.

    I've taken my masters at Ateneo and from my experience, the students have just as much talent and ability as my classmates in undergrad. So why can't a school from the Philippines make the top ten of a rankings list? I have some opinions but I'm really veering off too much already from the UAAP subject heading.

    I do agree with Rockgardener that its what the person takes out of the school and the character of that person that really matters.

    Sorry for this long post, maybe we should just start this under the "Pinoy Culture" heading.

    Peace.

    [This message has been edited by Kaboom! (edited 08-12-1999).]
  • clawed_outclawed_out PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    well UST's IN! ;) & i'm glad that the four best universities in the Phil. are in this league! cheers & more power!
  • i agree w/ wat batang uliran said about becoming thankful 4 d person u are today and kaboom's mention regarding what u take out from the school is that really matters. you guys said it all. rankings are only rankings. this is not basketball where 1 can easily quantify nor assess the quality an institution dishes out. its a lot more complex than that.

    besides, from wat the diff. criterias i observed in these so-called "accurate" surveys, such a large % is given weight on academic prestige. A certain person from the academe in a country rates the universities from other countries! now, what do they know about our universities here? their opinions are based on image. oh, but i believe education transcends image.

    in the end, it is really what the graduate of a certain institution becomes. now, surveys cannot really determine how the graduates have fared in the real world do they?

    it is impt also for me to add, that a school should not only teach its students to fish, but 2 know fishing is not the only thing there is to life. i think surveys dont take that into consideration dont they?

    everybody should not degrade another school 4 their rankings nor try to hit below the belt. as always, "asaran" is always fun between the arch rivals, pero walang pikonan at personalan.

    ciao!
  • REALITY CHECK

    First of all, I would like people to know I was a student of LSGH throughout grade school and high school. I also studied in DLSU-Main for 1 year last year. I transferred to the Ateneo only this year and I am currently in my sophomore year taking up Computer Science. FYI, I was a dean's lister in DLSU for three trimesters prior to transferring to the Ateneo.

    Based on my own personal experience, I find the Ateneo to be a superior academic institution compared to DLSU. My opinion is based on the quality of the students, the demands of the teachers and quality of teaching, the overall intensity of the environment, etc. While I found it not too difficult to make it to the dean's list in DLSU, I must admit I am barely making it right now in the Ateneo. The differences between the two schools are like night and day. There are numerous high school valedictorians, salutatorians, and honors students in my batch in the Ateneo. In DLSU, I can count with one hand the number of such students. The amount of work and studying in the Ateneo is incomparable to DLSU and I am not even going into the details here. It is also noteworthy that in LSGH, the majority of the honors class, typically more than 75%, choose the Ateneo for College over DLSU. The same is true in DLSZ where the top three students usually end up in the Ateneo. I say "noteworthy" since these are people who have the talent and the resources to go wherever they want and they choose the Ateneo over DLSU.

    In addition, there is a recent article (see below) which dealt with the issue of tertiary education in the Philippines. Here, it is significant to note DLSU's absence from what is referred to as "Category A" institutions. Only the Ateneo, UP, UST and AIM are considered Category A institutions in the Philippines and DLSU is noticeably absent. The article also questions the validity of the controversial, discontinued AsiaWeek survey, which La Sallians like to flaunt. After all, the same survey ranked DLSU behind the Ateneo in three of the last four years, and the 2000 survey was the very first time DLSU managed to go past the Ateneo, albeit by a measly 0.03% margin owing to Internet bandwidth statistics.


    For easy reference, the full article is below:


    Beneath the skin of Philippine tertiary institutions
    Sunday, 09 09, 2001


    Giorvinne Yambao, who comes from a middle-income family, finished high school in one of the prominent co-education secondary schools in Metro Manila. An average student as she professed, takes pride for being able to study in one of the few "elite" tertiary schools in the metropolis. She is now a freshman taking up liberal arts at Miriam College in Quezon City.

    In the case of Wilson Lombog, also an average student, contents himself in a not-so-prominent university in Manila. Unlike Giorvinne, Wilson comes from the low-income bracket of the society. He is a freshman taking up Chemical Engineering at the Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Maynila.

    What unites the two students, is their common goal of getting a good job the moment they finish college.

    "There are many schools here (Philippines) but my choices limit to those which offer affordable tuition," Wilson said.

    "But this early, my aspiration of having a job right after graduation is being dampened by companies which require their applicants to be graduates of UP, Ateneo, De La Salle or those schools which charge high tuition," he added.

    In the Philippines, there exists a general notion of equating education to high tuition. A random survey of graduating high school students in Metro Manila showed majority of would-be college students either want to enter Ateneo, the University of Sto. Tomas, or La Salle because of prominence, either brought by their projected image of being "elite" or academic reputation.

    "In the Philippines, it has become almost a status symbol among the Philippine elite to send their children to schools that charge high tuition," said Rev. Fr. Rolando dela Rosa, OP, former rector of the University of Sto. Tomas.

    The University of the Philippines, considered as the premier State University in the country, emerged as the favorite choice. But common perception pervading among senior high school students dictates UP's intimidating academic environment which shuns students with average intellectual capacity. This makes general students narrow their choices to private sectarian schools known for what the media, which include the advertising world, labeled them.

    The Philippines has an existing culture of extolling the upper class, making the rich as the yardstick for excellence in various areas — intellectual ability or otherwise. They have become, as it were, icons for devotion. This stream of aristocratic devotion is but some of the Iberian dregs Filipinos inherited during the Spanish regime where the ilustrados were given preferential treatment by the governing state.

    Although it is not an elitist school if we are to speak of the amount of tuition it charges to its students, the University of Sto. Tomas manages to attract a considerable number of high school applicants compared to Ateneo and De La Salle.

    Fr. Dionisio Cabezon, OP, director of the UST Testing Center, said for this school year, UST received about 40,000 graduating high school applicants and roughly 7,000 were accepted. While the Ateneo and De La Salle got about 18,000 and 25,000 applicants, respectively with roughly 15 percent and 20 percent got accepted.

    In the recent survey conducted by Fund Assistance for Private Education (FAPE), most companies in the country prefer hiring applicants who are graduates from big universities and some exclusive colleges in Metro Manila. Graduates from schools that are projecting a low-profile image but nonetheless perform quite well in government licensure examinations were nowhere in the list.

    "Again, that's because of the notion that only the elite schools can produce good graduates. They equate quality education to high tuition," said Dr. Mona Valisno of the Commission of Higher Education (Ched).

    According to Ched, one of the effective ways of gauging the quality of a school's performance is through the achievement in the government's licensure or board examinations given by the Professional Regulation Commission (PRC).

    In a recent report released by the PRC analyzing the performance of 875 colleges and universities in government licensure examinations for the period 1994 to 1998, the agency came out with a list of 10 leading schools that registered high passing rates (HPR) in 10 or more licensure examinations. These schools are (1) University of the Philippines-Diliman, (2) University of Sto. Tomas, (3) Xavier University, (4) Silliman University, (5) Central Philippine University, (6) St. Louis University, (7) De La Salle University-Dasmariñas, (8) Mariano Marcos State University, (9) St. Paul University and (10) Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Maynila.

    Out of the 875 higher education institutions the PRC reported, 199 registered high passing rate in at least one licensure examination. Fifty-six of these high-performing institutions are government schools and 143 are privately owned.

    Valisno said aside from a school's performance in government licensure examinations, other way of measuring a school's quality was through the number of centers of excellence (COE) and centers of development (COD) Ched is granting per discipline a university or college offers. This scheme was introduced in 1994 to spur colleges and universities to strive for global excellence.

    To be able to receive a COE status, Valisno explained the school must meet certain criteria such as profile of the teaching faculty, performance in board examinations, instructional facilities and research capabilities. A grant of P3 million is bestowed for a discipline with COE status and P1 million for COD. Incentives can be used for faculty development, upgrading of facilities, scholarship or professional chairs.

    Based on the recent data furnished by Ched, it is quite disheartening to note that among the 78 tertiary institutions monitored by the agency, only 40 colleges and universities received COE status while the rest got a COD recognition. Of course, a university or college can get as many COEs or CODs as long as the field of specialization it offers meet the criteria imposed by the technical panel of Ched.

    In the National Capital Region (NCR) where the supposed crème dela crème higher learning institutions are concentrated, only six institutions received COE and COD recognitions while five got a COD status only.

    The University of the Philippines-Diliman got the most number of COEs with 23 disciplines granted; followed by the University of Sto. Tomas, 11; De La Salle University, 10; Ateneo, 9; and UP-Manila and Philippine Normal University both have 2 COEs. (pls. refer to chart).

    "Budget plays a significant role. We can only grant incentives based on our financial capabilities. If we see some schools deserving of a COE status but our budget says we have to restrict, then we have to abide at the expense of continued excellence," Valisno said.

    Last year, the share of higher education from the overall budget of the national government accounted for was mere 2.54 percent or an equivalent of P16.909 billion. Pejorative or not, this puts the Philippines on the top list of 44 countries surveyed by the World Bank on the private sector share in higher education, which means resources needed by the country's higher education come more from the pockets of the students and parents.

    And considering the rather sad affair of the country's economy, it is not surprising that only 199 out of 875 colleges and universities registered a high passing rate in at least one licensure examination while the rest are either declared as average performing, low performing or zero performing. A zero performing is classified if none of a school's examinees passed any board examination in the five-year period covered by the PRC study.

    "What it is tragic about is, in spite of this sorry state of affairs it is expected that students will continue to pour into the various higher learning institutions regardless of their quality. This is likely to happen because Filipinos put a very high premium on college education," said Dr. Reynaldo Peña of Ched.

    "Parents are willing to part their precious possessions In exchange for that piece of sheepskin called diploma, " he added.

    The Ched said one of the indicators of quality of higher education that can be considered also is the acceptability of Philippine graduates abroad. This was one of the concerns of the Ched in formulating its strategies for excellence in the country's higher learning institutions in the 21st century. To actualize this, interviews were conducted by the sub task force on quality and comparability of Ched with officials of seven embassies of different countries namely Great Britain, France, Finland, Denmark, New Zealand, United Arab Emirates and Jordan to determine which Philippine schools are accredited or recognized by these countries.

    The interviews revealed university of the Philippines was the most frequently mentioned Philippine school, followed by University of Sto. Tomas, and Ateneo de Manila University. These schools, along with the Asian Institute of Management were rated category A, which means excellent.

    "However, while the UP was the most frequently mentioned, the reason given was mainly of its being a state university," the Task Force said in its study titled "Philippine Higher Education in the 21st Century: Toward Excellence and Equity."

    The same goes for the National Office of Overseas Skills Recognition (Noosr) of the Department of Employment, Education and Training of Australia which rated UP, UST, Ateneo, and AIM as category A which means these institutions meet international standards in the way they are understood and accepted in Australia.

    Sad to say other Philippine schools which have been perceived to be "elite" because of the apparent high tuition they charge and that understood by the society as one of the best tertiary schools in the country were rated in category B or do not completely meet international standards.

    According to Peña, over P42 billion was virtually wasted by a group of college graduates from 1994 to 1998. This group, he said, consisted of the total number of non-passers in the 41 licensure examinations given by the PRC for the five-year period.

    Going back to the latest PRC study, only 37 percent or 313,199 examinees out of the total 840,148 examinees passed the board exams during the five-year period. This leaves 526,949 or 63 percent of the takers who failed in the government licensure examinations.

    "Based on a yearly average of P10,000 for tuition and other fees paid by each of the 526,949 non-passers, plus an annual average per capita living expenses of P10,000 the hard earned money shelled out by their parents totaled to a staggering P42.155 billion; and sadly this amount went done the drain because the non-passers did not become the professionals that they had wanted to be," Peña said.

    The Philippines has more than 1,090 colleges and universities, more than 50 percent of the total number are privately owned, owing to inability of the national government to shoulder bulk of the costs of putting up learning institutions. And since the government cannot afford to shell out financial subsidies to private schools in as much as it wants to uplift the quality of education, privately owned tertiary institutions seem to have no choice but to subsist principally on tuition.

    Private school administrators argue that the only way to improve the quality of education is through the costs of investment a school would put in. Thus, if we were to follow the thread of their argument, it would seem clear that the higher the tuition, the better the quality of education offered by a school.

    Here is a rundown of the list of tertiary institutions in Metro Manila with their corresponding tuition per unit for the academic year 2001-2002.

    University of Asia and the Pacific (UA&P).. P1,583.00
    Ateneo de Manila University .....................P1,441.90
    De La Salle University............................... P1,247.00
    Miriam College...........................................P1,180.00
    St. Scholastica's College........................... P1,022.00
    Assumption College.................................. P969.00
    Mapua Institute of Technology................. P950.00
    AMA Computer College............................. P760.69
    College of the Holy Spirit.......................... P747.04
    San Beda College...................................... P700.00
    St. Joseph's College.................................. P690.24
    University of Sto. Tomas............................ P622.60
    Colegio de San Juan de Letran.................. P550.00
    Trinity College............................................ P549.00
    Far Eastern University................................ P534.00
    San Sebastian College............................... P511.20
    Philippine Women's University.................... P470.00
    St. Paul's College (Manila).......................... P453.85
    University of the East................................. P437.00
    Manuel L. Quezon University...................... P448.00
    Lyceum University....................................... P445.00
    Manila Central University.............................P378.00
    National University.......................................P366.00
    Adamson University.................................... P349.00
    Perpetual Help College............................... P345.34
    Centro Escolar University............................ P343.00
    Feati University.............................................P328.20
    Technological Institute of the Philippines.... P309.00
    PATTS.......................................................... P300.00
    University of the Philippines........................ P300.00
    Philippine Christian University..................... P294.00
    Philippine Normal University........................ P250.00
    Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Maynila........... P67.00
    Polytechnic University of the Philippines...... P12.00

    Based on the figure given above, average tuition per semester ranges from P800 to as much as P40,000 for a regular load of 21 units. It is noteworthy to stress whether those schools that charge high tuition can really be considered as at par with their Asian counterparts. Apparently, there are schools in the list that charge very high tuition but do not earn COE and COD recognitions from Ched or did not simply perform quite well in the government's licensure examination if we are going to base on the PRC's recent five-year study.

    Of course there are myriad factors that necessitate a reality check whether students of these schools do really get the value of the tuition they pay. We have to consider other variables such as facilities and recognition from local and international peers.

    Among the schools listed above, one would take notice the wide disparity of the tuition per unit being charged by the University of Sto. Tomas compared from the tuition of its peers or even those schools that were not even rated at par with Asian tertiary institutions. Considering the UST's low tuition and the kind of education it offers, the university's experience itself could serve as a statement that high tuition need not equate with quality education — a belief embraced by most Filipinos.

    "We do not agree to the idea that education should be treated as a commodity. We believe that the teaching profession is a mission not a profitable enterprise," Father Cabezon of the UST said.

    The UST official added while the pontifical university might be a victim of the popular notion that only the "elite" schools provide quality education as evident in most local placement ads which require applicants to be graduates of certain elite schools,"the view is not well accepted abroad insofar as UST's academic reputation is concerned."

    Father Cabezon cited UST's impressive linkages with 34 big educational institutions in Europe, America and Asia such as the University of Liverpool in the United Kingdom; the University of Strathclyde in Scotland; the Catholic University of Leuven in Belgium; Maastricht University, the Netherlands; the Royal Society of London; Boston University; University of Oklahoma; University of Arizona; Kyoto University; and the National University of Singapore, among others.

    "We are not an elitist school and yet look at how UST is recognized abroad. These already indicate UST's global acceptability," he said. "Of course, to establish academic consortia with big universities abroad, the quality of the programs you offer as well as the facilities of the school must at least meet the standards of the cooperating institution. In the Asiaweek survey of Asia's best universities for year 2000, only four Philippine universities managed to land in the survey. These are UP, Ateneo, DLSU and UST. The results received harangue from critics in the region including our very own UP who questioned the publication's method in conducting the survey. This had prompted a number of big universities in the region not to participate anymore in the coming surveys. As if admitting that the survey's method was flawed, Asiaweek decided to not to continue the controversial survey.

    In the meantime, the rise in the costs of education appears to be incessant, given the yearly tuition increases from these schools, which they claim as necessary to improve the quality of education.

    In a country where poverty incidence is substantially high, is it not a moral obligation for private sectarian schools to consider the welfare of the majority by offering quality education without ripping you off?

    The latest data from the National Statistics Coordinating Board (NSCB) revealed that poverty incidence in the Philippines or the proportion of families with income below the poverty line increased from 31.8 percent in 1997 to 34.2 percent in 2000. In proportion to the population, poverty incidence rose from 36.8 percent in 1997 to a staggering 400 percent last year.

    It is not therefore surprising if out-of-school youth incidence in the Philippines continues to rise given the prohibitive costs of education. Compounding the problem is the distressing habit of companies requiring job seekers to be graduates from certain "elite" tertiary institutions that contribute to the country's unemployment rate. As of April this year, the country's unemployment rate rose to 13.3 percent — the highest in 14 months.

    According to Ched, there were 373,387 college students who graduated this year and based on government estimates only 2.5 percent of the total graduates have been employed based on their desired job. These graduates mostly belong to the upper bracket of the society who were educated from the "high-profile" schools.

    On the other hand, graduates who come from the lower class of the society and were educated in low-keyed schools but nonetheless performing quite well like the Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Maynila (PLM) and Polytechnic University of the Philippines (PUP) have to content themselves to low-paying jobs mostly finding themselves as sales persons, etc. or in abroad working as contractual workers.

    Now here comes the financial statement of selected private tertiary institutions. The public may not be aware that the country's so-called crème de la crème private tertiary institutions, which are mostly sectarian were raking in millions of pesos in revenues.

    Data available from the Securities and Exchange Commission are the 1999 financial statements of the non-stock, non-profit educational institutions. Here is a rundown of selected tertiary institutions with their corresponding gross revenues and net income for the academic year ending 1999.

    Institution............................. Gross Revenues......Net Income
    University of Sto. Tomas........ P678.496 million..... P10.874 million
    Ateneo de Manila University...P636.466 million......P15.463 million
    De La Salle University-Manila..P462.098 million......P6.731 million
    Miriam College Foundation Inc.P275.466 million.....P18.35 million
    University of Asia and the Pacific P211.793 million..P0.765 million
    Assumption College Inc............P192.246 million.... P42.034 million

    A close scrutiny of their financial statements show that bulk of their revenues mainly derive from their tuition collection. Although UST has the lowest tuition among the six schools surveyed, the Dominican-run institution still topped the tuition revenue category with earnings amounted to P525.656 million. This is due to the schools higher student population which has about 30,000 students.

    Wilson Lombog, freshman student from PLM who is rather irresolute about his fate in the corporate world three years from now, bemoaned schools that shield them from the need to offer their tertiary programs at low rates all the while maintaining a high degree of profitability.

    "Where are their social responsibilities? Aren't they (sectarian schools) supposed to be the paragon of equality; an education that cares?" Wilson asked.

    "Even if they mold their students to be 'man for others' or let's say, that motto from Taft which says they educate the rich to help the poor, would still end up meaningless. What happened to Erap (ex-President Joseph Estrada), did he end up to be the 'man for others?' Why do the rich are getting richer and the poor are getting poorer? Their mottos actually don't make sense," Wilson opined.

    In the meantime, hundreds of thousands of students like Wilson have to satisfy themselves with relatively inexpensive schools. Their parents have to make ends meet to be able to send them to college and fulfill the promise of a better life. Sad is, the promise is often realized in the domestic service sector, sidetracked by graduates of schools that cater to the upper middle class' and the elite or those schools that produce trend-setting collegialas.
  • "The heart of the Philippines throbs with the blood of the University of Santo Tomas"
    - King Juan Carlos de Borbon of Spain
  • archerguyarcherguy PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    So what's with reviving this very old thread just to announce your 'Class A' evaluation by an Australian organization???

    Pathetic.
  • gangreen, what course did you take up in La Salle? From what magazine/newspaper did you get that article?
  • Originally posted by Gangreen
    REALITY CHECK

    First of all, I would like people to know I was a student of LSGH throughout grade school and high school. I also studied in DLSU-Main for 1 year last year. I transferred to the Ateneo only this year and I am currently in my sophomore year taking up Computer Science. FYI, I was a dean's lister in DLSU for three trimesters prior to transferring to the Ateneo.

    Based on my own personal experience, I find the Ateneo to be a superior academic institution compared to DLSU. My opinion is based on the quality of the students, the demands of the teachers and quality of teaching, the overall intensity of the environment, etc. While I found it not too difficult to make it to the dean's list in DLSU, I must admit I am barely making it right now in the Ateneo. The differences between the two schools are like night and day. There are numerous high school valedictorians, salutatorians, and honors students in my batch in the Ateneo. In DLSU, I can count with one hand the number of such students. The amount of work and studying in the Ateneo is incomparable to DLSU and I am not even going into the details here. It is also noteworthy that in LSGH, the majority of the honors class, typically more than 75%, choose the Ateneo for College over DLSU. The same is true in DLSZ where the top three students usually end up in the Ateneo. I say "noteworthy" since these are people who have the talent and the resources to go wherever they want and they choose the Ateneo over DLSU.

    In addition, there is a recent article (see below) which dealt with the issue of tertiary education in the Philippines. Here, it is significant to note DLSU's absence from what is referred to as "Category A" institutions. Only the Ateneo, UP, UST and AIM are considered Category A institutions in the Philippines and DLSU is noticeably absent. The article also questions the validity of the controversial, discontinued AsiaWeek survey, which La Sallians like to flaunt. After all, the same survey ranked DLSU behind the Ateneo in three of the last four years, and the 2000 survey was the very first time DLSU managed to go past the Ateneo, albeit by a measly 0.03% margin owing to Internet bandwidth statistics.


    For easy reference, the full article is below:


    Beneath the skin of Philippine tertiary institutions
    Sunday, 09 09, 2001


    Giorvinne Yambao, who comes from a middle-income family, finished high school in one of the prominent co-education secondary schools in Metro Manila. An average student as she professed, takes pride for being able to study in one of the few "elite" tertiary schools in the metropolis. She is now a freshman taking up liberal arts at Miriam College in Quezon City.

    In the case of Wilson Lombog, also an average student, contents himself in a not-so-prominent university in Manila. Unlike Giorvinne, Wilson comes from the low-income bracket of the society. He is a freshman taking up Chemical Engineering at the Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Maynila.

    What unites the two students, is their common goal of getting a good job the moment they finish college.

    "There are many schools here (Philippines) but my choices limit to those which offer affordable tuition," Wilson said.

    "But this early, my aspiration of having a job right after graduation is being dampened by companies which require their applicants to be graduates of UP, Ateneo, De La Salle or those schools which charge high tuition," he added.

    In the Philippines, there exists a general notion of equating education to high tuition. A random survey of graduating high school students in Metro Manila showed majority of would-be college students either want to enter Ateneo, the University of Sto. Tomas, or La Salle because of prominence, either brought by their projected image of being "elite" or academic reputation.

    "In the Philippines, it has become almost a status symbol among the Philippine elite to send their children to schools that charge high tuition," said Rev. Fr. Rolando dela Rosa, OP, former rector of the University of Sto. Tomas.

    The University of the Philippines, considered as the premier State University in the country, emerged as the favorite choice. But common perception pervading among senior high school students dictates UP's intimidating academic environment which shuns students with average intellectual capacity. This makes general students narrow their choices to private sectarian schools known for what the media, which include the advertising world, labeled them.

    The Philippines has an existing culture of extolling the upper class, making the rich as the yardstick for excellence in various areas — intellectual ability or otherwise. They have become, as it were, icons for devotion. This stream of aristocratic devotion is but some of the Iberian dregs Filipinos inherited during the Spanish regime where the ilustrados were given preferential treatment by the governing state.

    Although it is not an elitist school if we are to speak of the amount of tuition it charges to its students, the University of Sto. Tomas manages to attract a considerable number of high school applicants compared to Ateneo and De La Salle.

    Fr. Dionisio Cabezon, OP, director of the UST Testing Center, said for this school year, UST received about 40,000 graduating high school applicants and roughly 7,000 were accepted. While the Ateneo and De La Salle got about 18,000 and 25,000 applicants, respectively with roughly 15 percent and 20 percent got accepted.

    In the recent survey conducted by Fund Assistance for Private Education (FAPE), most companies in the country prefer hiring applicants who are graduates from big universities and some exclusive colleges in Metro Manila. Graduates from schools that are projecting a low-profile image but nonetheless perform quite well in government licensure examinations were nowhere in the list.

    "Again, that's because of the notion that only the elite schools can produce good graduates. They equate quality education to high tuition," said Dr. Mona Valisno of the Commission of Higher Education (Ched).

    According to Ched, one of the effective ways of gauging the quality of a school's performance is through the achievement in the government's licensure or board examinations given by the Professional Regulation Commission (PRC).

    In a recent report released by the PRC analyzing the performance of 875 colleges and universities in government licensure examinations for the period 1994 to 1998, the agency came out with a list of 10 leading schools that registered high passing rates (HPR) in 10 or more licensure examinations. These schools are (1) University of the Philippines-Diliman, (2) University of Sto. Tomas, (3) Xavier University, (4) Silliman University, (5) Central Philippine University, (6) St. Louis University, (7) De La Salle University-Dasmariñas, (8) Mariano Marcos State University, (9) St. Paul University and (10) Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Maynila.

    Out of the 875 higher education institutions the PRC reported, 199 registered high passing rate in at least one licensure examination. Fifty-six of these high-performing institutions are government schools and 143 are privately owned.

    Valisno said aside from a school's performance in government licensure examinations, other way of measuring a school's quality was through the number of centers of excellence (COE) and centers of development (COD) Ched is granting per discipline a university or college offers. This scheme was introduced in 1994 to spur colleges and universities to strive for global excellence.

    To be able to receive a COE status, Valisno explained the school must meet certain criteria such as profile of the teaching faculty, performance in board examinations, instructional facilities and research capabilities. A grant of P3 million is bestowed for a discipline with COE status and P1 million for COD. Incentives can be used for faculty development, upgrading of facilities, scholarship or professional chairs.

    Based on the recent data furnished by Ched, it is quite disheartening to note that among the 78 tertiary institutions monitored by the agency, only 40 colleges and universities received COE status while the rest got a COD recognition. Of course, a university or college can get as many COEs or CODs as long as the field of specialization it offers meet the criteria imposed by the technical panel of Ched.

    In the National Capital Region (NCR) where the supposed crème dela crème higher learning institutions are concentrated, only six institutions received COE and COD recognitions while five got a COD status only.

    The University of the Philippines-Diliman got the most number of COEs with 23 disciplines granted; followed by the University of Sto. Tomas, 11; De La Salle University, 10; Ateneo, 9; and UP-Manila and Philippine Normal University both have 2 COEs. (pls. refer to chart).

    "Budget plays a significant role. We can only grant incentives based on our financial capabilities. If we see some schools deserving of a COE status but our budget says we have to restrict, then we have to abide at the expense of continued excellence," Valisno said.

    Last year, the share of higher education from the overall budget of the national government accounted for was mere 2.54 percent or an equivalent of P16.909 billion. Pejorative or not, this puts the Philippines on the top list of 44 countries surveyed by the World Bank on the private sector share in higher education, which means resources needed by the country's higher education come more from the pockets of the students and parents.

    And considering the rather sad affair of the country's economy, it is not surprising that only 199 out of 875 colleges and universities registered a high passing rate in at least one licensure examination while the rest are either declared as average performing, low performing or zero performing. A zero performing is classified if none of a school's examinees passed any board examination in the five-year period covered by the PRC study.

    "What it is tragic about is, in spite of this sorry state of affairs it is expected that students will continue to pour into the various higher learning institutions regardless of their quality. This is likely to happen because Filipinos put a very high premium on college education," said Dr. Reynaldo Peña of Ched.

    "Parents are willing to part their precious possessions In exchange for that piece of sheepskin called diploma, " he added.

    The Ched said one of the indicators of quality of higher education that can be considered also is the acceptability of Philippine graduates abroad. This was one of the concerns of the Ched in formulating its strategies for excellence in the country's higher learning institutions in the 21st century. To actualize this, interviews were conducted by the sub task force on quality and comparability of Ched with officials of seven embassies of different countries namely Great Britain, France, Finland, Denmark, New Zealand, United Arab Emirates and Jordan to determine which Philippine schools are accredited or recognized by these countries.

    The interviews revealed university of the Philippines was the most frequently mentioned Philippine school, followed by University of Sto. Tomas, and Ateneo de Manila University. These schools, along with the Asian Institute of Management were rated category A, which means excellent.

    "However, while the UP was the most frequently mentioned, the reason given was mainly of its being a state university," the Task Force said in its study titled "Philippine Higher Education in the 21st Century: Toward Excellence and Equity."

    The same goes for the National Office of Overseas Skills Recognition (Noosr) of the Department of Employment, Education and Training of Australia which rated UP, UST, Ateneo, and AIM as category A which means these institutions meet international standards in the way they are understood and accepted in Australia.

    Sad to say other Philippine schools which have been perceived to be "elite" because of the apparent high tuition they charge and that understood by the society as one of the best tertiary schools in the country were rated in category B or do not completely meet international standards.

    According to Peña, over P42 billion was virtually wasted by a group of college graduates from 1994 to 1998. This group, he said, consisted of the total number of non-passers in the 41 licensure examinations given by the PRC for the five-year period.

    Going back to the latest PRC study, only 37 percent or 313,199 examinees out of the total 840,148 examinees passed the board exams during the five-year period. This leaves 526,949 or 63 percent of the takers who failed in the government licensure examinations.

    "Based on a yearly average of P10,000 for tuition and other fees paid by each of the 526,949 non-passers, plus an annual average per capita living expenses of P10,000 the hard earned money shelled out by their parents totaled to a staggering P42.155 billion; and sadly this amount went done the drain because the non-passers did not become the professionals that they had wanted to be," Peña said.

    The Philippines has more than 1,090 colleges and universities, more than 50 percent of the total number are privately owned, owing to inability of the national government to shoulder bulk of the costs of putting up learning institutions. And since the government cannot afford to shell out financial subsidies to private schools in as much as it wants to uplift the quality of education, privately owned tertiary institutions seem to have no choice but to subsist principally on tuition.

    Private school administrators argue that the only way to improve the quality of education is through the costs of investment a school would put in. Thus, if we were to follow the thread of their argument, it would seem clear that the higher the tuition, the better the quality of education offered by a school.

    Here is a rundown of the list of tertiary institutions in Metro Manila with their corresponding tuition per unit for the academic year 2001-2002.

    University of Asia and the Pacific (UA&P).. P1,583.00
    Ateneo de Manila University .....................P1,441.90
    De La Salle University............................... P1,247.00
    Miriam College...........................................P1,180.00
    St. Scholastica's College........................... P1,022.00
    Assumption College.................................. P969.00
    Mapua Institute of Technology................. P950.00
    AMA Computer College............................. P760.69
    College of the Holy Spirit.......................... P747.04
    San Beda College...................................... P700.00
    St. Joseph's College.................................. P690.24
    University of Sto. Tomas............................ P622.60
    Colegio de San Juan de Letran.................. P550.00
    Trinity College............................................ P549.00
    Far Eastern University................................ P534.00
    San Sebastian College............................... P511.20
    Philippine Women's University.................... P470.00
    St. Paul's College (Manila).......................... P453.85
    University of the East................................. P437.00
    Manuel L. Quezon University...................... P448.00
    Lyceum University....................................... P445.00
    Manila Central University.............................P378.00
    National University.......................................P366.00
    Adamson University.................................... P349.00
    Perpetual Help College............................... P345.34
    Centro Escolar University............................ P343.00
    Feati University.............................................P328.20
    Technological Institute of the Philippines.... P309.00
    PATTS.......................................................... P300.00
    University of the Philippines........................ P300.00
    Philippine Christian University..................... P294.00
    Philippine Normal University........................ P250.00
    Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Maynila........... P67.00
    Polytechnic University of the Philippines...... P12.00

    Based on the figure given above, average tuition per semester ranges from P800 to as much as P40,000 for a regular load of 21 units. It is noteworthy to stress whether those schools that charge high tuition can really be considered as at par with their Asian counterparts. Apparently, there are schools in the list that charge very high tuition but do not earn COE and COD recognitions from Ched or did not simply perform quite well in the government's licensure examination if we are going to base on the PRC's recent five-year study.

    Of course there are myriad factors that necessitate a reality check whether students of these schools do really get the value of the tuition they pay. We have to consider other variables such as facilities and recognition from local and international peers.

    Among the schools listed above, one would take notice the wide disparity of the tuition per unit being charged by the University of Sto. Tomas compared from the tuition of its peers or even those schools that were not even rated at par with Asian tertiary institutions. Considering the UST's low tuition and the kind of education it offers, the university's experience itself could serve as a statement that high tuition need not equate with quality education — a belief embraced by most Filipinos.

    "We do not agree to the idea that education should be treated as a commodity. We believe that the teaching profession is a mission not a profitable enterprise," Father Cabezon of the UST said.

    The UST official added while the pontifical university might be a victim of the popular notion that only the "elite" schools provide quality education as evident in most local placement ads which require applicants to be graduates of certain elite schools,"the view is not well accepted abroad insofar as UST's academic reputation is concerned."

    Father Cabezon cited UST's impressive linkages with 34 big educational institutions in Europe, America and Asia such as the University of Liverpool in the United Kingdom; the University of Strathclyde in Scotland; the Catholic University of Leuven in Belgium; Maastricht University, the Netherlands; the Royal Society of London; Boston University; University of Oklahoma; University of Arizona; Kyoto University; and the National University of Singapore, among others.

    "We are not an elitist school and yet look at how UST is recognized abroad. These already indicate UST's global acceptability," he said. "Of course, to establish academic consortia with big universities abroad, the quality of the programs you offer as well as the facilities of the school must at least meet the standards of the cooperating institution. In the Asiaweek survey of Asia's best universities for year 2000, only four Philippine universities managed to land in the survey. These are UP, Ateneo, DLSU and UST. The results received harangue from critics in the region including our very own UP who questioned the publication's method in conducting the survey. This had prompted a number of big universities in the region not to participate anymore in the coming surveys. As if admitting that the survey's method was flawed, Asiaweek decided to not to continue the controversial survey.

    In the meantime, the rise in the costs of education appears to be incessant, given the yearly tuition increases from these schools, which they claim as necessary to improve the quality of education.

    In a country where poverty incidence is substantially high, is it not a moral obligation for private sectarian schools to consider the welfare of the majority by offering quality education without ripping you off?

    The latest data from the National Statistics Coordinating Board (NSCB) revealed that poverty incidence in the Philippines or the proportion of families with income below the poverty line increased from 31.8 percent in 1997 to 34.2 percent in 2000. In proportion to the population, poverty incidence rose from 36.8 percent in 1997 to a staggering 400 percent last year.

    It is not therefore surprising if out-of-school youth incidence in the Philippines continues to rise given the prohibitive costs of education. Compounding the problem is the distressing habit of companies requiring job seekers to be graduates from certain "elite" tertiary institutions that contribute to the country's unemployment rate. As of April this year, the country's unemployment rate rose to 13.3 percent — the highest in 14 months.

    According to Ched, there were 373,387 college students who graduated this year and based on government estimates only 2.5 percent of the total graduates have been employed based on their desired job. These graduates mostly belong to the upper bracket of the society who were educated from the "high-profile" schools.

    On the other hand, graduates who come from the lower class of the society and were educated in low-keyed schools but nonetheless performing quite well like the Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Maynila (PLM) and Polytechnic University of the Philippines (PUP) have to content themselves to low-paying jobs mostly finding themselves as sales persons, etc. or in abroad working as contractual workers.

    Now here comes the financial statement of selected private tertiary institutions. The public may not be aware that the country's so-called crème de la crème private tertiary institutions, which are mostly sectarian were raking in millions of pesos in revenues.

    Data available from the Securities and Exchange Commission are the 1999 financial statements of the non-stock, non-profit educational institutions. Here is a rundown of selected tertiary institutions with their corresponding gross revenues and net income for the academic year ending 1999.

    Institution............................. Gross Revenues......Net Income
    University of Sto. Tomas........ P678.496 million..... P10.874 million
    Ateneo de Manila University...P636.466 million......P15.463 million
    De La Salle University-Manila..P462.098 million......P6.731 million
    Miriam College Foundation Inc.P275.466 million.....P18.35 million
    University of Asia and the Pacific P211.793 million..P0.765 million
    Assumption College Inc............P192.246 million.... P42.034 million

    A close scrutiny of their financial statements show that bulk of their revenues mainly derive from their tuition collection. Although UST has the lowest tuition among the six schools surveyed, the Dominican-run institution still topped the tuition revenue category with earnings amounted to P525.656 million. This is due to the schools higher student population which has about 30,000 students.

    Wilson Lombog, freshman student from PLM who is rather irresolute about his fate in the corporate world three years from now, bemoaned schools that shield them from the need to offer their tertiary programs at low rates all the while maintaining a high degree of profitability.

    "Where are their social responsibilities? Aren't they (sectarian schools) supposed to be the paragon of equality; an education that cares?" Wilson asked.

    "Even if they mold their students to be 'man for others' or let's say, that motto from Taft which says they educate the rich to help the poor, would still end up meaningless. What happened to Erap (ex-President Joseph Estrada), did he end up to be the 'man for others?' Why do the rich are getting richer and the poor are getting poorer? Their mottos actually don't make sense," Wilson opined.

    In the meantime, hundreds of thousands of students like Wilson have to satisfy themselves with relatively inexpensive schools. Their parents have to make ends meet to be able to send them to college and fulfill the promise of a better life. Sad is, the promise is often realized in the domestic service sector, sidetracked by graduates of schools that cater to the upper middle class' and the elite or those schools that produce trend-setting collegialas.

    THE ONLY REALITY CHECK THAT SHOULD BE DONE IS A CHECK ON YOUR I.Q.

    Just when I thought you have exceptional intellectual capability selling yourself by breezing through DLSU academic system and garnering successive Dean's List recognition. This perception, however, radically changed with your attention on encrypted in bold letters in an article you quoted.

    Perusing the article did not reveal that DLSU is not a part of any quantitative and qualitative analysis of academic achievement.

    The only aspect that DLSU is not included is the list of universities

    FREQUENTLY MENTIONED. Probably, being a computer science major has knocked a lot of common research sense out of your brain.

    A FREQUENTLY MENTIONED school, just like brands, are names that are frequently RECALLED through top of mind recall. TOP OF MIND RECALL does not have a linear relationship with TOP OF HEART mention or the brand most preferred. Furthermore, RECALL does not have a DIRECT relationship with an institution's quality.

    Check your research book. If you have decided to pursue your studies somewhere else aside from being in DLSU, then we respect that. But picking up blind lines and CONCLUDING BLINDLY IS ANOTHER ISSUE.

    I thought you were smart. hahaha.... U L O L! :D:D:D
  • gasgas na yang topic na yan. let's all end the bickering. Pag no. 1 na ang mga schools na yan tsaka na mag-away.
  • Nge!

    Kung taga La Salle ka, e di manahimik ka na lang dun.

    Kung taga Ateneo ka naman, manahimik ka na lang din dun.

    Para walang away, manahimik na lang tayong lahat at mag-aral, para umunlad naman ang bansa natin.:)

    Basta ako mananahimik na lang at mag-aaral sa UST.:)

    :saint:
  • hay naku nakakasawa ng topic...it doesn't matter which school is the best...ang importante you're doing your mission in life as a student and that is..to study!

    Yun lang!

    Viva Sto. Tomas!
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