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Dare to be (Pinoy a.k.a. Filipino Americans)

SyChuanSyChuan PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
Read full text here:
http://www.geocities.com/Tokyo/Pagoda/4534/bergano.html

Dare to be Pinoy

by Allan Bergano


"......We are Pinoy!! We are Filipino Americans!! We have a distinct American identity!! We have a unique American historical presence!! We have a rich, diverse Filipino American culture!!

American citizenship is not free. Freedom isn't even free. Someone had to pay the price. I learned that my father and Pinoy uncles of the 1920's and 30's paid this price by absorbing the worst forms of racism, oppression, discrimination and genocide than any other generation of Filipino immigrants. They earned my right to be called an American. They were the only ones who opened the doors of opportunities for descendants like me that eternally remained shut to them. I will never forget these sacrifices....and neither should you.

Therefore, it is up to us, as descendants of these great American pioneers, to embrace the Pinoy spirit by continue building the road where they left off in the uphill struggle of claiming our place globally as well as in American society.

Today, Filipino Americans are the largest Asian Pacific American ethnic group in the United States. We outnumber the Japanese, the Chinese, the Vietnamese, the Koreans...We are the largest!!!. Period.

Filipino Americans are oldest Asian Pacific American ethnic group in the United States. We came here before the Japanese, the Chinese, the Vietnamese, the Koreans. We have been in the country since 1587...We are the oldest!!! Period.

If we are the largest and oldest Asian Pacific American ethnic group in this country, why are we not mentioned in American History books. Why are we not mentioned in American history classes? Furthermore, why does the historical ignorance extend to our fellow "kapatid" in the Philippines?

When I sat in American history class, I had to learn about the migration of the Germans, Italians, and Irish into this country. I had to learn about the plight of the Blacks from the days of slavery to Martin Luther King. I had to learn about the Japanese interment camps during WWII. I had to learn about the Korean War and the Vietnam War. But what about us?

I want to know why the first Pinoy settlement was in New Orleans, Louisiana in 1763?

I want to know why in 1930, a Mr. D.W. Rohrback who was a Northern Monterey County Justice of the Peace denounced Filipinos as " the most worthless, shiftless, diseased, semi-barbarians that ever came to our shores". He charged the Pinoys with being disease carriers, destroying the American wage scale, and attempting to allure young American and Mexican girls. This judge asserted that "Filipinos, migrating from a very primitive society, were able to live 15 in one room and to sustain themselves on only rice and fish. In short, they corroded American standards of labor and morality."

I want to know why Pinoys could not become American citizens until July 2, 1946?

I want to know why Pinoys could not intermarry with whites in the state of Virginia until 1967?

I want to know why Filipinos who fought for this country under the American Flag during WWII are still being denied American citizenship and Veteran benefits?

If you do not know the answers to these questions, you do not know your history. If you do not know your history, you do not know your identity. If you do not know your identity, you will answer to anything. If your identity has no history, you do not exist.


If our historical contributions, here in these United States of America, are not included in the American educational curriculum, where then will our voices be validated? How then will our stories be learned?

Therefore, it is up to us... as descendants of the Manilamen of New Orleans in 1763... as grandchildren of the Sakadas in Hawaii since 1906... as sons of the Pinoys of the 1920's and 30"s... as daughters of Filipino American World War II veterans... as children of mess stewards, cooks, nurses, doctors, educators, accountants, and engineers who settled in America's East coast and Mid-west in the 1960's and 70's... it is up to all of us... to take charge of our destiny...by enhancing and claiming our identity as Filipino Americans... by embracing all obstacles overcame...experiences endured...differences accepted... in these United States... and passionately promote this diverse legacy of resistance and resiliency called Filipino American history.

I dare you to be Pinoy.

"

So do the Pinoys a.k.a Filipino Americans know the answers to the above questions?

If not check out the site and get more info on how Filipinos in the US helped paved the way,for many Filipinos to be able to enjoy the American dream. "American citizenship is not free. Freedom isn't even free. Someone had to pay the price"

Give more experiences and facts to help the pinoys know their identity. because "if your identity has no history, you do not exist"

Comments

  • never really endured anything of the sort, but with my experiences on dealing with Westerners, I'd say they're all afraid of us...
  • SyChuanSyChuan PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    El_Kapitan wrote: »
    never really endured anything of the sort, but with my experiences on dealing with Westerners, I'd say they're all afraid of us...



    Well that is because the pioneer Pinoys already endured it for us.

    Check out the full text on the link. Is there any truth to it, are there any Filipino-Americans here in pex that is a direct decendant of the first FIlipinos in America? Share your grandparents/ parents stories here.
  • JeffreywJeffreyw PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    The American whites feel threatened of Pinoys or even Asians in general.

    So every time you hear racists remarks against Pinoys or Asians, it is because they're jealous.
  • karahasankarahasan 🦅 Eagle Squad🏅
    The only "logical" explanations I can think are (in regards to our lack of mention in US history books):

    1) Because maybe Filipinos came in trickles, instead of in droves. (least likely though)

    2) Mentioning Filipinos will open up a whole can of worms with regards to American imperialism and oppression. For instance, why were were given last priority over the Europeans in WWII, despite the fact that we were US property (and had laws that made us priority one should WWII happen)? Is it the Americans who implanted colonial mentality into Filipinos? How many died in massacres during the Fil-Am war?

    For those reasons, they keep us out of history books. As to what purpose, whether to prevent the youth from causing the country to revert back to its more obvious imperialist ways, or to save America's image, is up in the air for me.
  • Jeffreyw wrote: »
    The American whites feel threatened of Pinoys or even Asians in general.

    So every time you hear racists remarks against Pinoys or Asians, it is because they're jealous.

    i get what you mean when they say they might be jealous or afraid but there are outright racist whites who are just that, racist, and will be biased against nonwhites in thought or in deed.

    they didn't hang blacks in the old south out of pure envy.
  • SyChuanSyChuan PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    I think the paper is not concerned on racism but actually about finding ourselves. Being "Pinoy" or "Filipino Americans"

    The italians, irish etc. left their country to look for better places to live, The Filipinos came to the US with the same reason, they endured hardships and taught their children well so that they may integrate nicely into their new home.

    The article for me is more of realizing being Filipino american is not just only having been born there, or documents proving it. It more of we are Filipino americans and this is the history of Filipino americans. Much like the History of Americans having to declare their independence from the Kingdom. Much like the african americans having Martin luther to fight for civil rights.

    Without the pioneer Filipinos their sacrifices their story,it is Highly possible that Filipino americans today would not be able to enjoy what is being given to them freely now.

    Therefore if Filipino americans are not taught about their own history at school, being a Filipino American it is one's duty to know it, it is the duty of the Parents to teach it to their children. As doing so we can find ourselves and know who we are , how we came to , and why we are here.

    Filipino Americans are not Americans in the sense that they declared independence from the kingdom,but they have their on History in America. America did not fully accept their adopted children at first, but later learned to love them and took care for them. That is why Filipino Americans must serve and love America, For America took them in and cared for them, but at the same time Filipino Americans should never forget Philippines for that is where their ancestors came from.This is their identiy and their history.
  • I am a proud pinoy...and never thought and never will consider changing my nationality or adding another nationality to my being filipino...

    Americans are idiioottss....period
  • SyChuanSyChuan PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    d_red_tab wrote: »
    I am a proud pinoy...and never thought and never will consider changing my nationality or adding another nationality to my being filipino...

    Americans are idiioottss....period

    Your patriotism is verging on racism.

    One point of the above posts is that Filipino Americans should remember or at least know about Philippines as it is their History.

    A Filipino American may not know how to speak Filipino or other Phil. dialect, may have no Filipino culture, may even dislike eating Filipino food. But they should never never forget their history, their ancestors are Filipino and that Filipinos came from the Philippines. Therefore any Filipino American who says "I know nothing about the Philippines" should be educated, As they have no identity which will help them live a more meaningful life.
  • bondyingbondying PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    Being an american is not just speaking English the same way educated white americans do (accent and vocabulary).

    The color of your eyes and skin still counts high in how well you are going to be accepted by the greater white society.

    The mistake of pinoys is that they think that if they speak English as well as the educated white american and garnered enough diplomas to display on the wall they would gain acceptance and respect on the same level as the white american.

    Bergano's own experience describes the reality of being american and your race, the waiter would not accept my "American-ness". Instead, his hardened blue eyes reddened with rage and insisted that I move over to the side where "he" thought I belonged. A pinoy can also try to behave with the same air of entitlement in front of a cop or other government official and that pinoy would be hit with the cold and painfull reality of how it is to a white and non-white in America.

    I once asked an african-american friend, "why are there more white people attending anti-war rallies than black people? His answer corroborated my suspicion about the issue of race in america, "The cops disperse and hit the black people at rallies while the white demonstrators chat with them and they talk like buddies."

    Pinoys should discard the mistaken notion that becoming american means getting rid of and forgetting your roots. BIG MISTAKE!

    :D
  • SyChuan wrote: »

    If we are the largest and oldest Asian Pacific American ethnic group in this country, why are we not mentioned in American History books. Why are we not mentioned in American history classes? Furthermore, why does the historical ignorance extend to our fellow "kapatid" in the Philippines?

    Because Filipinos assimilate so well. They learn English, teach the kids English, learn to cook American foods, etc. They marry white people.

    I think one reason for this is that the Philippines is fractured so much by language and culture. They come here and meet other Filipinos and can't even speak the same language comfortably.

    My wife is from Leyte and speaks Cebuano. She meets someone here from Leyte and they turn out to be Waray. She was brought up to be cautious around the Waray for some reason.
  • AleanceloAleancelo guapo PEx Expert 🎖️
    SyChuan wrote: »
    .
    I had to learn about the Japanese interment camps during WWII. [/B]"

    Interment camps? Did they bury (or exhume) dead Japanese in those "interment camps" that you mentioned?
  • SyChuanSyChuan PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    Aleancelo wrote: »
    Interment camps? Did they bury (or exhume) dead Japanese in those "interment camps" that you mentioned?

    Hehe funny, I think the author meant internment camp.
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