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Men a minority in the teaching profession--DepEd chief

ЅUX2B?ЅUX2B? El Verdadero Guayabero PExer
MANILA -- Will Miss Tapia ever find a partner? Chances are she won't.

The stereotype of the stern, bespectacled teacher who terrorizes her pupils has no masculine equivalent in local schools -- and for good reason.

Male Filipino teachers are a vanishing breed, according to the Department of Education, which says that men account for only a miniscule portion of the entire teacher population in the country today.

“Only about seven percent of DepEd teachers are male,” said Education Secretary Jesli Lapus, who spoke at a press conference in Makati City last Friday.

Based on that estimate, there could be fewer than 30,000 men out of the 400,000 in DepEd’s pool of teachers.

The education secretary said the teaching profession has been attracting fewer and fewer male high school graduates over the years, as evidenced by the shortage of male teachers.

For Lapus, this is not a healthy sign.

“Teachers are supposed to be schoolchildren's second parents. But in schools, most of the role models are women,” he said.

Lapus said schoolchildren used to interacting with women teachers should also be exposed to masculine authority figures so they could learn values unique to men. (He did not elaborate on what those are.)

“In the '50s and '60s, there were higher levels (of male enrolment in teaching schools). But this has been dropping over the years,” he said. He added the trend has also been observed in other countries.

“That's because men are usually the breadwinners and they're forced to take risks, like going abroad where they can earn a higher salary,” Lapus said.

"Women, on the other hand, often decide to become teachers because even though the salary is not high, it is stable," said Chito Salazar, executive director of the Philippine Business for Education (PBEd).

Lapus admitted that the DepEd had no means of attracting male high school graduates.

"We can't discriminate. We can't offer them higher salaries," he said during an interview at the launch of PBEd's 1,000 Teachers Program, an ambitious plan to attract the best graduates into becoming teachers.

The PBEd said 1,000 Teachers would sponsor, through the support of partner schools and companies, the college education of some of the best graduating high school students through a full scholarship grant with stipends.

Successful applicants, who shall be required to take up education and major in English, Math or Science, will receive a monthly allowance of P2,000 for 10 months of each school year, and a book stipend of P2,000 per semester.

In return, they are expected to go back to their home province to teach in a public school for at least five years before considering other options.

Lapus said programs like 1,000 Teachers could help restore the positive image of teaching especially among young men and reinvigorate the education sector, which has been sore need of more funds for teachers, classrooms, and textbooks.

He said PBEd's advertising campaign featuring an equal number of male and female teachers could help young people identify once more with teachers.

Salazar said the 1,000 Teachers Program would not have any particular bias for male applicants but added that gender disparity in the teacher population should be addressed adequately by all sectors.

Copyright 2008 Philippine Daily Inquirer. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Your thoughts?

:)
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Comments

  • KuyaDannyKuyaDanny Moderator PEx Moderator
    The country needs you, SUX2BU. Come home. :)

    I wonder what the percentages are in private schools. I attended a private school here for two years of high school, and all my teachers were male. Has that changed now?
  • la_flashla_flash Banned by Admin PExer
    Most of my teachers in elementary and high school are females. The only time that I had a male teacher was when I had my vocational subjects (electronics, drafting, etc). I don't have any problems with having mostly female teachers as I can relate it to the fact that it was my mother who first taught me how to write and read (and she was very strict).

    There was a study before that says that this problem (men a minority in teaching profession) causes the increasing trend of homosexuality cases in the country.

    IMHO, there's no correlation here. Your teacher don't teach you your sexual preference.

    Other than that, I don't see any other problems here. I have high respect for women because of my female teachers, but it doesn't mean that I don't respect my fellow sons of adam.
  • AleanceloAleancelo guapo ✭✭✭
    Karamihan sa mga male teachers ay nagtuturo ng PE. Yung ibang subjects, kadalasan ay mga "bading."
  • AltweggAltwegg Son of the 80s PExer
    I think this increasing gap results from our peculiar trait of associating professions with gender. We have always associated cops, drivers, firefighters, etc. as jobs only a male can do. On the other hand, being a teacher, nurse or secretary is something only a female can do.

    I also see no problem with this disparity for as long as the teacher, regardless of gender, is able to perform his/her duty to share correct knowledge.
  • Mr. YoMr. Yo Now comes the mystery. ✭✭
    Altwegg wrote: »
    I think this increasing gap results from our peculiar trait of associating professions with gender. We have always associated cops, drivers, firefighters, etc. as jobs only a male can do. On the other hand, being a teacher, nurse or secretary is something only a female can do.

    I also see no problem with this disparity for as long as the teacher, regardless of gender, is able to perform his/her duty to share correct knowledge.

    I think "must" is the more appropriate word.
  • _SCUD__SCUD_ Banned by Admin PExer
    Meron akong barakong titser nung high school, kaya lang pag nagsusulat sa black board nakapilantik ang hinliliit.

    Kung ako sa DepEd, magpapalabas din lang sila ng advertising campaign, ipakita nila na nagtuturo ang mga tatay sa bahay. Akala tuloy ng mga bata pambabae lang ang pagiging guro dahil nanay lang ang mahilig magturo at magcheck ng assignments.
  • ЅUX2B?ЅUX2B? El Verdadero Guayabero PExer
    KuyaDanny wrote: »
    The country needs you, SUX2BU. Come home. :)

    You know what? I've been thinking about that lately.

    :)
  • ЅUX2B?ЅUX2B? El Verdadero Guayabero PExer
    Aleancelo wrote: »
    Karamihan sa mga male teachers ay nagtuturo ng PE. Yung ibang subjects, kadalasan ay mga "bading."

    Hindi nga rin ako sigurado sa tinutukoy ni Lapus kung paano niya kwinalipay 'yung "male." Sabi niya: "...schoolchildren used to interacting with women teachers should also be exposed to masculine authority figures so they could learn values unique to men."

    Kung tama ang sabi mo na sa ibang subjects ay kadalasan ay mga "bading" paano kaya natin makokonekta ito sa sinabi ni Lapus?

    :)
  • ЅUX2B?ЅUX2B? El Verdadero Guayabero PExer
    la_flash wrote: »
    There was a study before that says that this problem (men a minority in teaching profession) causes the increasing trend of homosexuality cases in the country.

    IMHO, there's no correlation here. Your teacher don't teach you your sexual preference.

    But don't you think that teachers are these kids' "second" parents? We always hear about the absence of a "father figure" damaging the boys' academic and psychological development and their future relationships, don't we?

    :)
  • ЅUX2B?ЅUX2B? El Verdadero Guayabero PExer
    Altwegg wrote: »
    I also see no problem with this disparity for as long as the teacher, regardless of gender, is able to perform his/her duty to share correct knowledge.

    Lapus's preoccupation is more on the lack of "masculine authority figures" which might have a negative impact on students.

    :)
  • math_techiemath_techie Member PExer
    i don't know with the stats...pero when it comes to college, mas marami atang lalaki na nagtuturp
  • ЅUX2B?ЅUX2B? El Verdadero Guayabero PExer
    i don't know with the stats...pero when it comes to college, mas marami atang lalaki na nagtuturp

    Depende rin 'ata 'yan sa major o kolehiyo. Malamang kung sa inhenyeriya o arkitektura ay mas marami ang lalaking nagtuturo.

    :)
  • ЅUX2B?ЅUX2B? El Verdadero Guayabero PExer
    _SCUD_ wrote: »
    Meron akong barakong titser nung high school, kaya lang pag nagsusulat sa black board nakapilantik ang hinliliit.

    Kung ako sa DepEd, magpapalabas din lang sila ng advertising campaign, ipakita nila na nagtuturo ang mga tatay sa bahay. Akala tuloy ng mga bata pambabae lang ang pagiging guro dahil nanay lang ang mahilig magturo at magcheck ng assignments.

    Hindi rin kaya dahil sa kulturang Pinoy na "macho guapito raw ako?" O mas mahaba lang talaga ang pasensiya ng mga gurong babae?

    Magandang tesina ito kung bakit kakapiranggot lang ang mga lalaking gustong manilbihan sa mga mag-aaral.

    :)
  • _SCUD__SCUD_ Banned by Admin PExer
    Baka rin naman kasi sa matandang kasabihan na "Yung mga walang magawa, nagtuturo" . Kaya siguro parang sampal sa pagkalalaki kung ang laki ng kanyang katawan ginagamit niya lang sa pagtuturo.

    Maaring isa rin dahilan ang kasabihan na "Ang kaalaman ay biyaya ng Diyos", kaya daw noong unang panahon hindi dapat bayaran ang mga nagtuturo at ipamahagi ang kaalaman nang libre.
  • RetroManilaRetroManila Pushing Daisies PExer
    Yeah, there aren't too many male teachers, but their number is slowly growing.

    However, I think the issue is not about getting more male teachers as gender is not that significant. (Unless you refer to exclusive schools shy of male teachers. :) )

    The sad decline of teachers shifting to other industries, the small number of education students (and some related courses), the little attention to strong/reliable teacher-training and assistance programs by the government and some schools, and the percentage of competent teachers leaving the country for better opportunities should be the cause of alarm.

    Male OR female, if we don’t have the right people for the right job, Philippine education maintains its slow moving state.
  • p1215p1215 Member PExer
    The monthly allowance of P2,000 for 10 months of each school year plus book stipend of P2,000 per semester for 1000 Teachers is small.

    P2000 for 1 month < 67 pesos/day.

    A monthly allowance of P5,000 for 10 months of each school year plus book stipend of P5,000 per semester for 400 Teachers seems more reasonable.
  • iRebirthiRebirth **** ✭✭✭
    so what?

    i agree with RetroManila that it is more of the number of our well-trained and proficient teachers that is on the decline, and hence is the more pressing truth to address.
  • RetroManilaRetroManila Pushing Daisies PExer
    I seriously do not understand the DepEd chief's press release about not having enough men in the academe when it was never a problem anyway.

    It's like signing for billions worth of internet access whereas the schools don't even have chairs, blackboards, books, rooms, and a decent pay for the teachers.
  • KuyaDannyKuyaDanny Moderator PEx Moderator
    If the youth of the country need more masculine authority figures, there are plenty of tambay in the streets successfully fulfilling their responsibilities as role models for tomorrow's leaders. :D
  • AleanceloAleancelo guapo ✭✭✭
    There's still the misconception that the teaching profession is not glamorous. Men still prefer to be seen as the necktie-wearing, attache case-carrying yuppie.
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