Mitral and Tricuspid Regurgitation

talipandas9talipandas9 Bigaon ever... PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
Hi medical folks. Hope you could alleviate my anxiety.

My HMO cardiologist recommended a 2d echocardiography to diagnose the pain I am feeling in the chest area. He noted on my referral slip that it could be angina syndrome.

After getting the results of my 2d echo, I was diagnosed to have a normal sized heart but the color doppler listed the following: mitral valve regurgitation - mild, tricuspid regurgitaion - mild, pulmonary hypertension - trace.

Bottom line: is this fatal? Will I have to avoid certain types of food?
I was not able to consult my HMO cardiologist anew because he was not available last Saturday and unfortunately, I don't have time to see a doctor immediately during the work week due to my busy schedule.

So far, from what I've read in some Internet articles - these findings are NOT good for me.
:mecry:

Comments

  • LesLes Member PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    Valvular (heart valve) problems generally do not cause mortalities unless they are left untreated. Just follow-up with your cardiologist and don't be shy to ask questions pertaining to those findings. Patients with valvular heart diseases don't need any significant changes in diet unless the person is already in heart failure, or they've been operated on and have artificial valves implanted.
  • talipandas9talipandas9 Bigaon ever... PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    Les wrote: »
    Valvular (heart valve) problems generally do not cause mortalities unless they are left untreated. Just follow-up with your cardiologist and don't be shy to ask questions pertaining to those findings. Patients with valvular heart diseases don't need any significant changes in diet unless the person is already in heart failure, or they've been operated on and have artificial valves implanted.

    Thank you Les. What kind of medicines are prescribed? I've read about ACE inhibitors and other medical gobbledygook that I can't understand. Will the therapy for this kind of condition entail a long-term support on prescribed drugs (similar to the treatment for PTB).

    Speaking of PTB, I had PTB way back in 2000 but I was cured already after undergoing the prescribed 6 months worth of medicines that should be taken. Did my previous PTB in any way cause this valvular heart problems?

    Lately, because of too much stress (including thinking about this condition that I have), the chest pain that I am experiencing have been becoming more often and longer lasting. Does this mean that the problem is turning worse? (God forbid!)

    thanks.
  • JazonEstiJazonEsti Business Guru PExer
    Hey, I also have that! Moderate mitral valve regurgitation and mild tricuspid regurgitation.

    I experienced palpitations (kabog sa dibdib), headaches and nausea and orthostatic hypotension (that is, when I go from sitting to standing, my blood pressure plummets and my vision dims).

    I am aware that I could die anytime due to arrhythmia and that am already predisposed to several diseases. I took meds before but those weren't helping my palpitation get better, and I knew that they would eventually lead to side-effects.

    Then I tried some supplements (omega-3) and changed my diet (eliminated caffeine as much as possible and removed pro-inflammatory foods like pork, beef, etc). Now, I experience almost no palpitations (except when I do not get enough sleep) and I can tolerate an occasional chocolate bar or drink without worrying.

    Since I had this condition since childhood, I can say that my life has definitely improved.

    Change your lifestyle now before you are forced to return to your doctor with further complications. From what I have experienced, stress can aggravate the symptoms.

    Hope that helps! You may contact me if you need support.
  • LesLes Member PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    Thank you Les. What kind of medicines are prescribed? I've read about ACE inhibitors and other medical gobbledygook that I can't understand. Will the therapy for this kind of condition entail a long-term support on prescribed drugs (similar to the treatment for PTB).

    Speaking of PTB, I had PTB way back in 2000 but I was cured already after undergoing the prescribed 6 months worth of medicines that should be taken. Did my previous PTB in any way cause this valvular heart problems?

    Lately, because of too much stress (including thinking about this condition that I have), the chest pain that I am experiencing have been becoming more often and longer lasting. Does this mean that the problem is turning worse? (God forbid!)thanks.

    I wouldn't really venture into guessing what medications would be prescribed to you because I don't have enough information, e.g. what is the underlying etiology for your valvular problems. ACE inhibitors are anti-hypertensives that are also used for other cardiovascular problems, e.g. heart failure. I'll leave it to your cardiologist to formulate the correct intervention/therapy.

    AFAIK, PTB doesn't cause valvular problems. Maybe it can cause heart problems if there is enough scarring to cause pulmonary hypertension, but you won't have such extensive fibrosis if you had your TB treated.

    Stress and anxiety can trigger chest pain in some cardiovascular diseases. It's hard to say if your heart problem is getting worse just based on that, especially since chest tightness/heaviness is sometimes a manifestation of anxiety attacks.

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