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The Case of Januario Galut: How Accurate is Our History?

kaningbrownkaningbrown Member PExer
Our national history has always been a weird one. Unlike many other countries who have their own historians like Plutarch, Herodetus, Thomas Carlyle and many others, we don't have a lot of historical data generated by our own kind.

For our case, colonized by three diffrent people in a span of almost 400 years, it's always the colonizers doing the writing for us. So what happens is that invaders basically walk in, kill everybody, and tell whoever's left what "really" happened.

As a result, most of our history books is filled mostly speculative writing that sometimes feels like they are no more than biased subjective opinion on the matter. For today's article, I'd like to feature a certain personality I remember only from first year high's social studies.

His name is Januario Galut and this man is probably the most infamous of traitors in our short but interesting history. As with all other fine details of our amazing history, Januario's name was only mentioned in the testimony of the Texas Regiment who asked for his services during the Philippine-American War.

In case you don't know what Janurio Galut is famous for, he is said to be a Christianized Tingguian(Igorot) mercenary who, like Ephialtes of the battle of Thermopylae, led the US forces around a hidden third path of the choke point Tirad Pass where Phil. General Gregorio Del Pilar stalled the American forces to let the then President Emilio Aguinaldo escape.

For somebody resoundingly treacherous, very little is known about this man. At school I was taught to consider him as a brown-skinned Judas Iscariot, who sold his own allies to the enemy at the face of a handsome reward. In text book illustrations, he is often depicted as a small, retarded looking igorot with a scowl and a smug.

Of course, upon research, none of these elaborations can be proven with any concrete documentation. And even more striking is the fact that upon further research, the whole "traitor" stance taken by so many historians and teachers might even be proven wrong.

Lewis & Clark Journal October, 1905 ran an article about the Igorots. In this article (parap.), details about the stance of Igorots (Januario's minority) were given.

In February 1899, war broke out between American troops and Philippine independence fighters known as insurrectos. The Igorot sent a contingent of men to fight the Americans at Caloocan outside of Manila, but the Igorot warriors, armed only with spears, axes, and shields, quickly decided to return home when confronted with American rifles and artillery. The Igorot soon fell out with the insurrectos and became U.S. allies, acting as guides for American troops in the rugged highlands of northern Luzon.

Much like the Italians who, at the end of the first and second world wars, found themselves at the front of a helpless struggle, the Igorot army adopted a reversed role in the war and started helping the other side.

It is also know then that even then, among early Filipinos, there was already strong discrimination towards the Tingguian people by their lowland country men and that they were hardly considered as part of the same race and it was not until the formal establishment of the Commonwealth Republic many years later that the indigenous Moros and Igorots were taken into the official pool of nationalities that formed the state population.

For this reason, reversing stances in a war like the Italians did was merely a tactical decision of an independent army and not exactly a last minute act of treachery by offical allies motivated by greed as romanticized by our history. It is highly possible that Januario Galut was, in fact, under orders to assist the Americans during the battle of Tirad Pass, which he did so. There was no mention of reward in any account given about the battle.

I'd like to end this little piece by saying it is possible that what is stated in this article is wrong and that history did not happen as I imagined it, but all logic and existing data is concerned, Januario Galut's nonbetrayal is more plausible than what is originally stated in our "historical" records.

Januario Galut, unfortunately, is only one of the many many misunderstood, misrepresented characters of our somewhat colorful national history.

http://redkinoko.blogspot.com/2007/05/historys-misunderstood-characters.html

I made this article just now. What do you guys think?
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Comments

  • SIOPAO MANSIOPAO MAN hooah! PExer
    Interesting...I guess you could call him the Benedict Arnold of Philippine history
  • JeffreywJeffreyw Member PExer
    Or Balaam in Isreal History.

    You have an interesting essay, i think you could be correct. I could support it with my own experience.

    I am cebuano bisayan , I grew up in Iligan in the 80s. Iligan was a once progressive city, thriving factories and industries were numerous. But i felt that we were neglected by the capital Manila. Some roads were still of dirt, poverty was evident everwhere. And there Manila has LRTs, TV networks.

    Our accent (possibly the muslims) are subject of jokes in TVs and movies, some of us find it rude and offensive.

    The present government still a disappointment.

    That is why a number of us don't "feel" we are Filipino. I think you've heard that Davao, Cebu want to separate and run their own goverment disintegrated from the present Manila goverment.
  • erap_arroyo99erap_arroyo99 Banned by Admin PExer
    basta filipinos arent that good when it comes to record-keeping
  • wolfsrainwolfsrain -aristaeus- PExer
    basta get two history books with different authorr, you'll see the inconsistency!!!
  • flimmmmeryroseflimmmmeryrose Member PExer
    but why can't we create a consistent history?
    It's really embarassing that we can't even decide on whether we are asian or pacific islander, then you hear controversies about our national hero, then a few years ago an island near Borneo is supposed to be part of our country, and there goes another debate.

    Is it because we are a poor country? Why do Africa have a more credible history accounts? They are also poor. Is it because we don't really care about history? Because we are not cultured? Because as a group, we have bad traits? Where are our historians? Lack of funding for researchers?

    I just noticed that a lot of our history books are written by foreigners. That is bad because they tend to construct an image that filipinos are hopeless , and US as the saviour. It's all about their side of the story. Sad that we don't have a voice of our own history.
  • flimmmmeryroseflimmmmeryrose Member PExer
    hahahhaa.. kaningbrown is promoting his blog.
    Nice job! That was clever. I should have thought of that.
    Promote my blog by introducing an issue..
    Just kidding..
  • kaningbrownkaningbrown Member PExer
    I wonder what will happen if I presented this to history professor? I remember trying to correct our history books once by using updated information I found from the internet concerning Napoleon's death, I was lambasted for going against the norm and was totally ignored in the end.

    @rose
    I'm not exactly promoting my blog in this thread. If I wanted people to go to my blog, I wouldnt bother posting the actual article here. I just posted the main source of the article for referential purposes. Getting people to discuss the topic I raised is my priority.
  • flimmmmeryroseflimmmmeryrose Member PExer
    I wonder what will happen if I presented this to history professor? I remember trying to correct our history books once by using updated information I found from the internet concerning Napoleon's death, I was lambasted for going against the norm and was totally ignored in the end.

    @rose
    I'm not exactly promoting my blog in this thread. If I wanted people to go to my blog, I wouldnt bother posting the actual article here. I just posted the main source of the article for referential purposes. Getting people to discuss the topic I raised is my priority.

    Correcting your professor through presenting an "updated information" from the internet? How credible is your source? Who wrote it? What's your tone when you tried to correct your professor? Was it during class hour? Because a good teacher would probably be happy to actually have a student who cares about his/her subject.
  • ftwcp955ftwcp955 Member PExer
    basta filipinos arent that good when it comes to record-keeping

    Because we don't have our own record to keep, Americans even toyed our history( maliban na pa ang mga kasinungalingan) by telling our MATATALINONG HISTORIANS before that our national bird is Maya, National flower is Ilang- Ilang, national animal is tamaraw, all those mentioned things are all over the world. Maya, they are like a cockroach they are everywhere.
  • the_BuGsthe_BuGs d ko hilig PExer
    Jeffreyw wrote: »
    Or Balaam in Isreal History.

    You have an interesting essay, i think you could be correct. I could support it with my own experience.

    I am cebuano bisayan , I grew up in Iligan in the 80s. Iligan was a once progressive city, thriving factories and industries were numerous. But i felt that we were neglected by the capital Manila. Some roads were still of dirt, poverty was evident everwhere. And there Manila has LRTs, TV networks.

    Our accent (possibly the muslims) are subject of jokes in TVs and movies, some of us find it rude and offensive.

    The present government still a disappointment.

    That is why a number of us don't "feel" we are Filipino. I think you've heard that Davao, Cebu want to separate and run their own goverment disintegrated from the present Manila goverment.

    it's the duty of your governor and representative not the malacanang....

    kaya nga may governor dahil sila ang little president ng isang probinsya eh... all projects will go thru them dahil sila humawahak ng projects...... at kung wala silang ginagawa wala silang silbe...

    nakapunta na ako ng iligan,cagayan de oro, bukidnon masasabi ko lang eh napakagandang lugar.....


    back to topic...


    yeah medyo magulo ang history natin... lalo na yung kay Agapito Flores...... shempre kailangan din sa history kung bakit natalo ang mga filipino.. shempre bibigyan mo rin ng dahilan... so ang nangyari ka-awa-awang galut sya yung napagbuntungan....
  • faux_phfaux_ph future technocrat PExer
    If Januario Galut is a Tinggian, he is not an Igorot. Tinggia =/= Igorot. Tinggians are taller and darker than Igorots. Most Tinggians in Ilocos during Spanish and American era inhabits the outskirts of urban centers ( occupied by mestizos and creoles and some native folks) in the lowlands unlike Igorots who prefer the highlands. Local oral history says that Januario Galut is resident of of an outskirt barangay of Candon, (now a city in Ilocos Sur) a sprawling town during this era, several kilometers from Tirad Pass.
  • baby_07baby_07 Take me to Paris. PExer
    If Januario Galut is indeed erratically portrayed in our history books, who knows what else are just based on erroneous information? I think it is quite disturbing to realize that some parts of our very rich and very dramatic history can just be mere fabrications, or worse, have never happened.

    Naaalala ko tuloy si Stephen Glass. But that's another story. :D

    I think our research facilities and resources should be improved. Not only to correct past records but to pave way for future discoveries and inventions. Masyado kasing binabalewala ang intellectual resources dito sa Pilipinas eh. Sheesh.
  • the_BuGsthe_BuGs d ko hilig PExer
    ^^ naaah pinoy kasi mahilig sa telenovela eh.... lalo na yung mga unang panahon.... tingnan nyo na lang yung mga librong nobela nuong panahon nuon... mapapanood mo sa TV ngayon :D
  • la_flashla_flash Banned by Admin PExer
    what's new?

    we couldn't even know where exactly the first mass was held in the philippines, or where did the katipuneros tore their cedulas...

    but this is really exciting... history being corrected during your lifetime.
  • kaningbrownkaningbrown Member PExer
    I also found out in reading that Limasawa was not where Magellan first landed because at that time, the nautical map of the area made it impossible to dock there, more so conduct the fist mass. Ironically, it's theorized that the name "Limasawa" came from the term "Di Mazaua" which is a malaya-spanish term that means "Not where Magellan Landed".

    There have also been theories about Magellan's eventual death in Mactan - that it was in fact suicide for a failed mission in claiming the Molluccas as part of the Spanish Hemisphere. (it was on the Portuguese half and barely out of Spanish territory)

    Unfortunately, we can all just speculate that what we already have is false, but that doesnt mean the alternatives are any more true since we really dont have any proof.
  • faux_phfaux_ph future technocrat PExer
    ^^Some historians, says its the island of Mazzaua, a neighboring island of the current site. This was attributed to the chronicles of Pigafetta, the official scribe, of making a typographical error in attaching the prefix "li" on the word "Mazzaua".
  • grim_reaper1814grim_reaper1814 Member PExer
    parang si lapu-lapu

    first filipino hero daw eh wala pa namang pilipinas noong 1521. tapos si, magellan, sinugod niya si lapu-lapu in behalf of zula.
  • faux_phfaux_ph future technocrat PExer
    ^^In addition, some historians say that "lapu-lapu" is not the exact name of the chieftain of the tribe who resisted against Magellan's troops but rather "Calih Culapu".
  • wolfsrainwolfsrain -aristaeus- PExer
    ^and some say magellan is not reaally magellan but magalhaiz (cant remember the spelling)
  • Cool_EnzCool_Enz The Sports Guy PExer
    So did Lapu-Lapu really killed Ferdinand Magellan? As in personally or in a one-on-one duel?…Just like what Aaron Burr did to Alexander Hamilton, or Brutus to Julius Caesar? Just wondering...:socool:
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