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RDX - Turbocharged VTEC

I'm drooling over the upcoming RDX.. Could turbochargers be in the new wave of honda engines? *okay* Also, to complete the package it wil have SH-AWD..

read link:
http://hondanews.com/CatID3000?mid=2006010451080&mime=asc

Comments

  • Honda hasnt really been known to boost up their engines out of the factory.

    Nissan already beat them to the turbo AWD with variable timing with this though: http://english.auto.vl.ru/catalog/nissan/x-trail/2001_10/20061/

    Sadly the engine has only been available on the Xtrail in Japan and some other markets AFAIK.
  • I wonder if Nissan Philippines offers that turbo as an upgrade for X-Trails sold here?
  • Rushman wrote:
    I wonder if Nissan Philippines offers that turbo as an upgrade for X-Trails sold here?

    Very unlikely... Then engine itself is different from what is being used here by the local Xtrails. We have the QR type engines and not the SR20VE ("V" stands for variable timing BTW).

    From some angles the RDX looks has tinges of the Mitsu Outlander in its profile... Honda engines have always been more known for high compression, high revving engines with high HP ratings but low midrange power and torque. They're already moving a way from this a bit it seems.
  • I think the application of the engine has something to do with it receiving turbocharging this time.

    On paper at least, adding a turbo will assist the new RDX in sticky situations, where you need the torque down low, instead of all the way up there as is Honda engineering/VTEC custom.

    Had that engine been used in a car, I think the blower would have been scrapped. As it is, there are only a handful of Honda cars that have received turbos straight out of the factory, and all of them are out of production and were never sold here.
  • The Acura CSX (Formerly known as EL. aka Civic Rebandged with luxury features) does look sweet thogh.

    2.0L engine.. 155 hp.. lots of torque..
  • Honda is similar to BMW in engine philosophy. Both carmakers share a disdain for turbocharging (unless it's for diesel engines, which both have already made).

    In an interview I read posted on one US Honda website, one of their engineers shared that turbocharging was an "ancient" and "easy way out" in terms of developing power; they'd rather challenge themselves to produce more power from atmospheric air pressure alone.

    One crucial difference: Honda tends to stick to its small four-banger engines. BMW is famous for its bigger straight sixes, so low-down torque is usually not a problem.
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