Home PEx Family and Society Parenting 101
'Tis the season. Happy Holidays, PExers!

Education Standard Here In Our Country

Question?

How many of you still believe that our Country's Education Standard is not good anymore for our Children's future?
Also our Children might find themeselves JOBLESS in our own country :depressed: and find themselves working abroad without any choice of bargaining their salary due to poor educational standard :depressed: .

Hoping for your opinions

Comments

  • sizzlingsizzling PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    Just curious... Why did you ask that? Do you plan to send your child abroad to get educated?
  • Nope, we are planning to immigrate. Most of my collegue kasi yun ang reason, however siyempre ilan lang sila compared to members of this website :) .
  • uh is this thread still alive? no...the disparity between the standard of education here and in other countries is so great it's not funny...i should know....my dad was a contract worker and because of that my brother,sisters and i were able to study under a british/australian curriculum and even the best private schools do not compare...also the "private school" culture/mentality here is suffocating and not conducive for just good,straight-forward,"stick-to-it" STUDY!!!
  • IMO, mataas pa din ang standards ng education sa pinas for grade school and high school esp. sa mga privates schools.. here in the US naman, if you compare yung private school dyan sa public school dito, i think in terms of academics mas mahirap ang school dyan sa pinas. but here sa public schools, iba ang focus nila sa mga bata, it's more of wholistic yung approach..they concentrate more on science and math plus extra curriculars like sports and arts. during my time in elem and HS ( i went to an exclusive catholic school for girls) pansin ko ang dami naming subject na wala naman talagang saysay like yung mga work ed. PE na walang kwenta, HELE, home economics. kaya ang nangyayari eh ang aga aga masyado ng start ng classes tapos ang late na pauwiin. halos wala ka ng time for doing other things. here in the US, mga 2-3pm pa lang uwian na ng mga bata then they could spend the rest of the day playing sports or taking another class like dance, piano, karate etc..para sa kin. mas ok pa yung ganun..in the phils din pansin ko parang spoon fedding masyado ang method of teaching compared the US na you should really have good study habits kasi kung hindi eh maiiwan ka talaga.

    comparing college education naman, for me, mas mataas ang standard dto sa US. except for medical courses like nursing, PT..medyo mahihirapan makapantay yung ibang courses.
  • ^wow! what state are you from, megan_cutie?
    coz where I'm at, public school education sucks, BIG TIME. lalong lalo na compared to where i went to school sa Pinas.
    with the no child left behind policy of the government, i think mas spoon-feeding pa dito because teachers teach to the slowest student in class. add to that the factors that special ed students are in the same class as students who have normal learning levels.
    i still prefer my education sa Pinas over the education that i see kids are getting here.
  • Most of those private catholic schools are just money pits when it comes to education. Most public schools are even worse.

    Just like anywhere, if you want quality, you have to pay for it. Although there's a lot of quality free public schools in the US you have to also 'pay' for it by relocating to their districts (which tend to be in the high mortgage areas of town).
  • mas mataas ang quality of education sa pilipinas kesa dito sa usa. kahit pa sa public education. uso dito ang social promotion. yung ipapasa ka kahit na you don't deserve your grade. mas matatalino ang mga pinoy. for sure. btw, i am currently going to school to earn my teacher certification here.
  • sneezy wrote:
    ^wow! what state are you from, megan_cutie?
    coz where I'm at, public school education sucks, BIG TIME. lalong lalo na compared to where i went to school sa Pinas.
    with the no child left behind policy of the government, i think mas spoon-feeding pa dito because teachers teach to the slowest student in class. add to that the factors that special ed students are in the same class as students who have normal learning levels.
    i still prefer my education sa Pinas over the education that i see kids are getting here.

    as i've said, mas mataas ang standard of education in the phils. for elem and high school in terms of academics. but sadly, the methods of teaching are very conservative, spoon feeding. all you need to know is memorize yung tinuro nung teavher then for sure papasa ka na sa exams.

    sneezy, i'm from irvine, california, one of the best school districts in the US. i know people who move here just so their kids can avail of the outstanding school system.
  • sneezy wrote:
    ^wow! what state are you from, megan_cutie?
    coz where I'm at, public school education sucks, BIG TIME. lalong lalo na compared to where i went to school sa Pinas.
    with the no child left behind policy of the government, i think mas spoon-feeding pa dito because teachers teach to the slowest student in class. add to that the factors that special ed students are in the same class as students who have normal learning levels.
    i still prefer my education sa Pinas over the education that i see kids are getting here.

    With regards to the "No Child Left behind" Act I think the really bad thing about it is that school funding is tied to how well a school performs in standardized tests, so it's not so much that the teacher is teaching to cater to the slowest student in the class but they are teaching to the test. They can't do anything about it, their hands are tied. You don't want to be the teacher who caused their school to lose funding. The irony is when the Gov't gives you funding bec they realize your school needs extra help they stop funding you when they see that your school is performing better and therefore don't need any more help. You are screwed either way.

    As to having special ed students in class it is difficult to have students in class who aren't at the same level as you but then again when you put 30 people in the one classroom they all have different intelligence levels anyway. The challenge for a teacher is teaching so that all students learn regardless of their skills and disabilities. Of course, if a students was so disabled (eg had an intellectual disability) that they made teaching/learning in that class difficult they won't be put in a mainstream class.

    With regards to the education standards in the Phils and overseas I prefer the standards overseas. I went to school in the Phils until grade 6 and the rest of my education in Australia. I remember learning about the table of elements in grade 6. And it was all a matter of memorizing and that was it. There wasn't even an explanation as to why the table was set up like that (noble gases all in one column, valencies, etc). It's true. students in the Phils are too spoon fed. There's hardly any independent learning and it's heavily reliant on memorizing facts and figures.
  • kristoffer wrote:
    Question?

    How many of you still believe that our Country's Education Standard is not good anymore for our Children's future?
    Also our Children might find themeselves JOBLESS in our own country :depressed: and find themselves working abroad without any choice of bargaining their salary due to poor educational standard :depressed: .

    Hoping for your opinions

    Our graduates do not "find themselves JOBLESS in our own country and find themselves working abroad" because of our supposed poor educational standards. They find themselves working abroad because there are no jobs here. And on the contrary, most of them even find themselves over-qualified or too educated for local jobs and local wages. That's why our locally-trained professionals lucratively practice their professions abroad and who can blame them.

    Also, if kids turn out to be "without any choice of bargaining their salary," most likely it's because they didn't do well in school no matter where they studied and not because of the over-all educational standards.
  • Nakalimutan ko palang sabihin ito: Since taxpayers pay for public education here in the US, they have a big role in terms of "demanding" what kind of changes should be implemented in education. The public continues to clamor for evidence that schools and teachers are in fact educating children and thus, high-stakes testing was born. High-stakes testing or use of data from a SINGLE test (example is the CAHSEE) to make decisions that have significant educational, financial, and social impact.

    In Florida, the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) mandates that graduating seniors from high school won't get their diploma if they don't past this high-stakes test and third-graders who fail this test won't be promoted to the next level.

    In the Philippines, I think wala pa namang high-stakes testing. Do we still use the report card model for assessing the educational progress of kids?
  • reykjavik wrote:
    With regards to the "No Child Left behind" Act I think the really bad thing about it is that school funding is tied to how well a school performs in standardized tests, so it's not so much that the teacher is teaching to cater to the slowest student in the class but they are teaching to the test. They can't do anything about it, their hands are tied. You don't want to be the teacher who caused their school to lose funding. The irony is when the Gov't gives you funding bec they realize your school needs extra help they stop funding you when they see that your school is performing better and therefore don't need any more help. You are screwed either way.

    As to having special ed students in class it is difficult to have students in class who aren't at the same level as you but then again when you put 30 people in the one classroom they all have different intelligence levels anyway. The challenge for a teacher is teaching so that all students learn regardless of their skills and disabilities. Of course, if a students was so disabled (eg had an intellectual disability) that they made teaching/learning in that class difficult they won't be put in a mainstream class.

    With regards to the education standards in the Phils and overseas I prefer the standards overseas. I went to school in the Phils until grade 6 and the rest of my education in Australia. I remember learning about the table of elements in grade 6. And it was all a matter of memorizing and that was it. There wasn't even an explanation as to why the table was set up like that (noble gases all in one column, valencies, etc). It's true. students in the Phils are too spoon fed. There's hardly any independent learning and it's heavily reliant on memorizing facts and figures.

    You are right about the special education students. Under IDEA-97, with only rare exceptions, schools are now required to include all children with disabilities in the general education classroom, curriculum, and annual statewide and districtwide achievement testing. And regular education teachers are now required to be members of the Individual Education Program or IEP teams for each child with a disability in their classes.
  • basta ako...mataas pa rin standard ng education sa pinas. D2 ala cla GMRC. maganda magtapos sa pinas dahil cheap ang tuition..maganda mag trabaho sa US dahil marame trabaho at malake bayad. :rotflmao:
  • bottom line, the parents should also expose their kids to different aspects of education. even a walk in the park can be educational, a talk about the constellations, etc. my aunt always supplies us educational toys like ant farms, microscopes, books.

    my classmates and i come from the same school, but growing up, we're so different. some of them don't even know where the eiffel tower is. or what the galapagos has to offer.

    schools should offer basics, but it is what you read and experience outside school that makes you smart.
Sign In or Register to comment.