How can i jump higher?

since i'm planning to start playing a sport that involves a lot of jumping...how do i improve my jumps? how can i jump higher? what muscles should be improved?
thanks!

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Comments

  • FineSTFineST tigakalis PExer
    i think to improve your leap, try using a jump sole, but its expensive. or not try jumping to steps sa stairs na naka-tiptoe ka, dont use your whole feet.

    about muscles, im not sure whats teh name of that part but its located between the knees and the your ankle.
  • IraIra Member PExer
    You can jump higher by undergoing physical training and exercises geared towards developing your quadriceps and gastrocnemius.
  • wilywily Member PExer
    Originally posted by Ira:
    You can jump higher by undergoing physical training and exercises geared towards developing your quadriceps and gastrocnemius.

    what kind of exercises? and physical training?

  • bybybyby Bacolodnon PExer
    leg press workouts and use leg weights.. just like fellow PEXers have suggested.. helps a lot talaga.
  • DexzillaDexzilla Member PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    try doing leg presses.
    use the balls of your feet to lift the weights then push it some more so that the calves are used. i can guarantee you can jump higher!

    happened to me!

    heheeheheeheheehehehehe
  • uptowngirluptowngirl Moderator PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    I have a friend who puts on leg weights even when he's walking around school. It helped build his leg muscles and thus he can jump higher than most people I know. :D
  • wilywily Member PExer
    Originally posted by uptowngirl:
    I have a friend who puts on leg weights even when he's walking around school. It helped build his leg muscles and thus he can jump higher than most people I know. :D


    where could i buy this kind of leg weights?
    can it be hidden under pants?
    around how much?
  • tRiStAntRiStAn Member PExer
    I don't recommend leg weights. Try doing plyometrics instead. Naku, more on this later. I'm in a hurry. ;)
  • bubububu Member PExer
    hey what about me???

    what if i just jump and jump??
    ayos na yun??
    but after a while, my knees begin to ache.
  • tRiStAntRiStAn Member PExer
    To continue, a high vertical jump is a must for volleyball players, that's why I'm not new to plyometric exercises. Our coach does not recommend leg weights because in the long run, they don't actually improve power. This is because they develop the wrong muscles and skip those that are indispensable for jumping. Plyometrics, on the other hand, are an effective exercise for jumping because they work on those muscles that are responsible for high jumps.

    Plyometrics are any exercise where the muscle is stretched before it is cotracted. A good example is push-ups with a clap in-between each push-up. Your muscle (pectorals in this case) is elongated and loaded by the downward force of your body, then immediately you must contract the muscle to push yourself back up. Plyometrics is one of the best ways to improve power, and for resistance movements like jumping, a faster muscle contraction means more power in the movement. So for high jumps, we're actually looking for not just muscle contraction but FAST muscle contraction. It has been shown that a muscle will contract the fastest when it has been loaded or stretched. This is why you should be able to jump higher if you crouch down then immediately jump up than if you started in the crouch.

    Here are some good plyometric exercises for increasing vertical jump.

    1. Two foot ankle hop (low intensity)

    keeping your feet together and remaining in one place hop up and down using only your ankles and calves. Concentrate on getting as high as you can and exploding off the ground as soon as you land.

    2. Rim Jumps (medium intensity)

    Stand under a basketball rim. Jump up touching the rim (or net or whatever) with alternate hands. Concentrate on getting as high as you can and exploding off the ground as soon as you land

    3. Box to Box jumps (high intensity)

    Place two boxes that will support your weight about 3 feet apart. Standing on one box step (NOT JUMP) off to the ground and immediately jump back up to the other box. Turn around and repeat. Obviously the difficulty of this exercise is increased as the height of the boxes are increased. Once again concentrate on getting as high as you can and exploding off the ground as soon as you land (notice a pat tern here?)

    I hope that helps. :cool:








    [This message has been edited by tRiStAn (edited 09-22-2000).]
  • fReAkfReAk CPP-NPA Lost Command PExer
    try this one... maglagay ka ng weights sa mga paa mo then jump as if you were playing vball hehehe

    reddevil.gif
  • ROLEXROLEX Member PExer
    try JUMP SOLES...
  • wilywily Member PExer
    Originally posted by tRiStAn:
    To continue, a high vertical jump is a must for volleyball players, that's why I'm not new to plyometric exercises. Our coach does not recommend leg weights because in the long run, they don't actually improve power. This is because they develop the wrong muscles and skip those that are indispensable for jumping. Plyometrics, on the other hand, are an effective exercise for jumping because they work on those muscles that are responsible for high jumps.

    Plyometrics are any exercise where the muscle is stretched before it is cotracted. A good example is push-ups with a clap in-between each push-up. Your muscle (pectorals in this case) is elongated and loaded by the downward force of your body, then immediately you must contract the muscle to push yourself back up. Plyometrics is one of the best ways to improve power, and for resistance movements like jumping, a faster muscle contraction means more power in the movement. So for high jumps, we're actually looking for not just muscle contraction but FAST muscle contraction. It has been shown that a muscle will contract the fastest when it has been loaded or stretched. This is why you should be able to jump higher if you crouch down then immediately jump up than if you started in the crouch.

    Here are some good plyometric exercises for increasing vertical jump.

    1. Two foot ankle hop (low intensity)

    keeping your feet together and remaining in one place hop up and down using only your ankles and calves. Concentrate on getting as high as you can and exploding off the ground as soon as you land.

    2. Rim Jumps (medium intensity)

    Stand under a basketball rim. Jump up touching the rim (or net or whatever) with alternate hands. Concentrate on getting as high as you can and exploding off the ground as soon as you land

    3. Box to Box jumps (high intensity)

    Place two boxes that will support your weight about 3 feet apart. Standing on one box step (NOT JUMP) off to the ground and immediately jump back up to the other box. Turn around and repeat. Obviously the difficulty of this exercise is increased as the height of the boxes are increased. Once again concentrate on getting as high as you can and exploding off the ground as soon as you land (notice a pat tern here?)

    I hope that helps. :cool:

    just one thing...
    so leg weights don't improve jumps?


  • tRiStAntRiStAn Member PExer
    They may work, but plyometrics are way better and more effective, for reasons I've stated in my previous post.
  • wilywily Member PExer
    does anyone know where i could get leg weights that could be worn under jeans? and how much would it cost? where could i get it? thanks!

    :angel:
  • IraIra Member PExer
    Originally posted by wily
    does anyone know where i could get leg weights that could be worn under jeans? and how much would it cost? where could i get it? thanks!

    :angel:

    I think you can get those in any sports shop.
  • tensiontension Member PExer
    Hi,

    Sorry it took so long to get to your topic, I've either been away or really busy.

    I think that you have to be very careful if you want to use plymetrics to improve your jumping ability. Plyometrics are used by athletes and has become very popular to improve the explosiveness in movements, but you should be very careful using them. They should only be used after you've attained a certain strength level and they should be part of an overall strategy to improve your performance.

    to improve you jumping, using plyometrics to improve your explosiveness should be secondary to first improving your overall lower body strenth. For instance, if you weight 150 lbs and you can leg press 200 pounds, you only have 50 pounds of surplus strenght use for jumping, etc. If you became stronger and could leg press 375 pounds, you would have 225 lbs of surplus to achieve your performance goal. (Remember that 375 lb number!). So, you should try to strenthen both the active and stabilizer muscles used for jumping, the glutes, the quadraceps and hamstrings,and calves. How? Use leg presses and squats as foundation exercises, then later use leg extensions, hamstring curls and lunges to add variety and strengthen the muscle from different angles. Your goal in foundation training should be absolute strength, get as strong as you can.

    After you are able to leg press 2 1/2 times you body weight, (ie. 375 lbs for a 150 person), then you can start doing plyometric training. Otherwise you just wouldn't be strong enough and the likelihood of injury is very high. There to two approaches to plymetric training. The old school said that it should only be done a couple of times a week when you weren't doing regual weight training and for very low reps. The new school likes to use the tern plyotonics and incorporates plyometric training as part of a resistance training program in the same workout to take advantage of the body's supercompensation response.

    Plyometrics and resistance training give you strenght and potential explosiveness in your movements, the next stage your involve more sport specific movements like jumping. But, I have to go now, more later.



  • As-66As-66 Member PExer
    Alam mo mahirap na tanong to eh. Maraming schools of thought na nagaaway about this. But if you don't wanna worry about which ones to try, hell, try em all! There's room for all workouts.

    1. Improve Stretch-Shortening Cycle. Plyo. They suggested it. It works for us. Should work for you.

    2. Improve Speed Strength through Olympic Lift derivatives. If you have access to a gym with weights, try the ff lifts but get someone to teach em to you: basic -- power clean, snatch grip hi pull. advanced -- squat clean, explosive box squats, jump squats.

    3. Improve Absolute Strength. Do heavy (5 reps below) Deadlifts and Squats. Make sure you have a good instructor as heavy lifting is potentially dangerous (like everything else)

    Generally sa team all three methods help us naman eh. So find which one works for you nalang. :goon:
  • As-66As-66 Member PExer
    Hey Tension!

    I don't do legpress (I don't use machines at all) but I do squats. My max single (below parallel) is 165lbs. I weigh 130lbs. Does that equate to an okay legpress? Kasi diba legpress naka 45 degree angle so siguro legpress ko mga 330lbs. Tama ba?

    Bka mamaya these plyos coach makes us do are bad for me!
  • tensiontension Member PExer
    Hi AS-66,

    You're right about what you said. I was referring to a leg press on a machine. A squat of 165lbs for a 130 lb man probably is over 300 lbs on the machine when you take into consideration your own body weigh as well as the angle of inclination. The 2 1/2 times body weight ratio is not absolute and can be adjusted down for lighter people. And finally, free weights tend to be better than machines because they work all the stabilizer muscles. Because you are lighter and therefore have higher relative strength than a heavier person like myself, you're probably more than able to do plyometrics safely.

    I just want to add a couple of safety notes:

    Tristan mentioned the box to box exercise. This is a good exercise. However, if you cannot land and take off quickly again without touching your heels on the ground, the boxes are too high. Use lower ones.
    Make sure you have well padded shoes.
    Try to avoid doing plyo's on concrete, a carpeted floor with padding will suffice, a rubberized floor is better, gymnasium mats are even better.
    Rest is very important for plyo's, it is very easy to injure yourself.

    BTW, I hope you don't mind but I looked in your profile. It said that you were into martial arts. Me too. I used to teach tai chi and shaolin chuan fa before falling head over heels in love with arnis and I also dabble in muay thai and shoot. (no more kung fu) Charles Staley, in The Science of Martial Arts Training, says that plyometrics are really over rated for martial arts training and that foundation weight training to develope absolute strength is much more important. But other sources like Donald Cho and Ed Dearse emphasize plyometric training as an absolute necessity. So, as you say, take your pick. Just try to avoid being injured in the process and loosing training time.

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