Leech Therapy

§ínned™§ínned™ Banned by Admin PExer
I was a bit shocked in what I saw on Ripley's last night. A kiddie patient whose left ear was almost severed by a dog was successfully re-attached and at a later stage his doctors did a leech therapy to fully rehabilitate the ear. The leeches, I believe, act as agents in fastening the dichotomized nerves while feasting on a certain member under therapy.

Are they doing this or was it done before in the Philippines? Doctors, please enlighten me more about this medical breakthrough.

Thank you.

§inned™

Comments

  • IraIra Member PEx Rookie ⭐
    Actually, using leeches in medicine is pretty old stuff-- people have been using them since the 18th century as phlebotomy tools. Leeches are very useful in microsurgery and plastic/reconstructive surgery, to overcome the problem of venous congestion by creating prolonged localised bleeding uniquely characteristic of the leech bite. It produces a small bleeding wound that mimics a venous circulation in an area of compromised tissue. The leech produces a number of important substances which contribute to the special property of the bite, including an anticoagulant, a local vasodilator and local anaesthetic. The artificial circulation gives the graft time to re-establish its own circulation. Their usefulness doesn't come thru reattachment of nerves; rather, they are useful in keeping the graft environment more "friendly", so the grafted parts will be accepted by the body.

    I'm not sure if they are doing this in the Philippines, but I know they are doing this a lot in Europe, and occassionally in the US. As a matter of fact, a pharmaceutical company, Biopharm, have been supplying the medical community with medicinal leeches for over a century (yes, even till now). Patient acceptibility/attitude towards having a bloodsucking parasite on the area is a hard thing to conquer, even if the procedure is painless mainly because the area to be treated is usually denervated and the leech produces its own anaesthetic. I have to admit, even I am a little squeamish at the thought of a leech stuck on me, inspite of the stuff medicine knows about this creature. :)
  • ghee0101ghee0101 Member PExer
    §ínned™ wrote: »
    I was a bit shocked in what I saw on Ripley's last night. A kiddie patient whose left ear was almost severed by a dog was successfully re-attached and at a later stage his doctors did a leech therapy to fully rehabilitate the ear. The leeches, I believe, act as agents in fastening the dichotomized nerves while feasting on a certain member under therapy.

    Are they doing this or was it done before in the Philippines? Doctors, please enlighten me more about this medical breakthrough.

    Thank you.

    §inned™

    after 13 years, here comes my post. i am also interested in this therapy. i heard that it's used mostly in europe, USA, canada and australia.

    please let me know if you discover a hosp/doctor who's using this in the philippines. thanks!

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