Home PEx News and Tech Local and Foreign Issues
Speak your mind, but mind what you post. Let's not spread disinformation and/or misinformation.

The Filipino Diaspora

Pinay wins it big in London
By Alfred Yuson
The Philippine Star 05/16/2004

Patricia Evangelista, a 19-year-old, Mass Communications sophomore of University of the Philippines (UP)-Diliman, did the country proud Friday night by besting 59 other student contestants from 37 countries in the 2004 International Public Speaking competition conducted by the English Speaking Union (ESU) in London.

She triumphed over a field of exactly 60 speakers from all over the
English-speaking world, including the United States, United Kingdom and Australia, reported Maranan.

The board of judges' decision was unanimous, according to contest chairman Brian Hanharan of the British Broadcasting Corp. (BBC).



PATRICIA'S SHORT SPEECH WORTH READING....
BLONDE AND BLUE EYES

When I was little, I wanted what many Filipino children all over the country wanted. I wanted to be blond, blue-eyed, and white.

I thought -- if I just wished hard enough and was good enough, I'd wake up on Christmas morning with snow outside my window and freckles across my nose!

More than four centuries under western domination does that to you. I have sixteen cousins. In a couple of years, there will just be five of us left in the Philippines, the rest will have gone abroad in search of "greener pastures." It's not just an anomaly; it's a trend; the Filipino diaspora. Today, about eight million Filipinos are scattered around the world. There are those who disapprove of Filipinos who choose to leave. I used to. Maybe this is a natural reaction of someone who was left behind, smiling
for family pictures that get emptier with each succeeding year.
Desertion, I called it. My country is a land that has perpetually fought for the freedom to be itself. Our heroes offered their lives in the struggle against the Spanish, the Japanese, the Americans. To pack up and deny that identity is tantamount to spitting on that sacrifice.

Or is it? I don't think so, not anymore. True, there is no denying this phenomenon, aided by the fact that what was once the other side of the world is now a twelve-hour plane ride away. But this is a borderless world, where no individual can claim to be purely from where he is now. My mother is of Chinese descent, my father is a quarter Spanish, and I call myself a pure Filipino-a hybrid of sorts resulting from a combination of cultures.

Each square mile anywhere in the world is made up of people of
different ethnicities, with national identities and individual personalities. Because of this, each square mile is already a microcosm of the world. In as much as this blessed spot that is England is the world, so is my neighborhood back home.

Seen this way, the Filipino Diaspora, or any sort of dispersal of
populations, is not as ominous as so many claim. It must be
understood. I come from a Third World country, one that is still trying mightily to get back on its feet after many years of dictatorship. But we shall make it, given more time.Especially now, when we have thousands of eager young minds who graduate from college every year. They have skills.
They need jobs. We cannot absorb them all. A borderless world presents a bigger opportunity, yet one that is not so
much abandonment but an extension of identity. Even as we take, we give back We are the 40,000 skilled nurses who support the UK's National Health Service. We are the quarter-of-a-million seafarers manning most of the world's commercial ships. We are your software engineers in Ireland, your construction workers in the Middle East, your doctors and caregivers in North America, and, your musical artists in London's West End.

Nationalism isn't bound by time or place. People from other nations migrate to create new nations, yet still remain essentially who they are. British society is itself an example of a multi-cultural nation, a melting pot of races, religions, arts and cultures. We are, indeed, in a borderless world!

Leaving sometimes isn't a matter of choice. It's coming back that is. The Hobbits of the shire traveled all over Middle-Earth, but they chose to come home, richer in every sense of the word. We call people like these balik-bayans or the 'returnees' -- those who followed their dream, yet choose to return and share their mature talents and good fortune.

In a few years, I may take advantage of whatever opportunities come my way. But I will come home. A borderless world doesn't preclude the idea of a home .

I'm a Filipino, and I'll always be one. It isn't about just geography;
it isn't about boundaries. It's about giving back to the country that shaped me.

And that's going to be more important to me than seeing snow outside my windows on a bright Christmas morning.

Mabuhay. and Thank you.
«13456

Comments

  • WaGGyWaGGy PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    I read this days ago. :D congrats sa kanya.

    ...but regarding the "returnees" hmmmm...a lot of Pinoys na nakaalis na sa bansa ay ayaw ng bumalik. :( They petition their family until wala ng matira sa Pinas...sad but true, not that they hate the country...its more about the current situation, nagsasawa na sila at ayaw na nilang maghirap uli kaya kung may pagkakataon ay lilisanin nila ang Pilipinas.
  • We are a country whose best, brightest and richest are steadily leaving because of an inept, thieving government.

    It would be naive to believe that there is any hope for the filipino nation if things remain as they are.
  • Originally posted by Prof_JP

    It would be naive to believe that there is any hope for the filipino nation if things remain as they are.

    probably because apart from crab mentality and lack of trust, our minds are corrupted by belief that we won't EVER make it...
  • probably because apart from crab mentality and lack of trust, our minds are corrupted by belief that we won't EVER make it...
    No. It's because the evidence for it is there. Just take a look at what's happening in the recently concluded elections.
  • bafanabafana PEx Rookie ⭐
    Originally posted by Prof_JP
    We are a country whose best, brightest and richest are steadily leaving because of an inept, thieving government.

    It would be naive to believe that there is any hope for the filipino nation if things remain as they are.

    Why just blame the government? Can we, as Filipinos, not own up collectively the failure of this nation? The government is corrupt because the citizenry allowed it to be so. The citizenry is corrupted because it put corrupt politicians to run the government. And the cycle of blame goes on.

    It's so naive to blame one party yet not own up to our faults as well.

    If this country is just so hopeless, then by god, people should vote with their feet. But if we'll just keep yakking and doing nothing, then vote Eddie Gil!
  • Originally posted by bafana
    Why just blame the government? Can we, as Filipinos, not own up collectively the failure of this nation? The government is corrupt because the citizenry allowed it to be so. The citizenry is corrupted because it put corrupt politicians to run the government. And the cycle of blame goes on.

    It's so naive to blame one party yet not own up to our faults as well.

    If this country is just so hopeless, then by god, people should vote with their feet. But if we'll just keep yakking and doing nothing, then vote Eddie Gil!

    nice point....;)
  • Originally posted by Prof_JP
    No. It's because the evidence for it is there. Just take a look at what's happening in the recently concluded elections.

    so what about the recently concluded elections?

    if you're an opposition, basically you would say it was filled with cheating and fraud...
    even before election started, opposition has a back-up plan of saying the election is flawed ,if ever they don't muster enough votes to dislodge the incumbent..

    if your pro-administration, ofcourse in defense of the process, you would say that the election was orderly and that election fraud was not that massive and it was only caused by local conflicts and could not affect national results...

    point is, it depends whose side we are in, partisan politics again...lack of trust...

    maglabas man ng maglabas ng ebidensya ang opposition, the question that remains unanswered, would they garner enough numbers to support their claim?
  • If this country is just so hopeless, then by god, people should vote with their feet.
    What makes you think they aren't doing exactly that?

    Isn't that what you just quoted me as saying?
  • Originally posted by Prof_JP
    We are a country whose best, brightest and richest are steadily leaving because of an inept, thieving government.

    It would be naive to believe that there is any hope for the filipino nation if things remain as they are.


    sana na lang marealize ng mga natira na ganito na nga ang nangyayari. sana may makaisip ng paraan kung paano ito maaaring lutasin. mukhang gagawin ng pamahalaan ang lahat ng paraan upang i-sugar coat ang mga realidad ng lipunan dahil sa kanila rin babalik ang sisi. and they don't want that to happen.
  • Originally posted by Prof_JP
    We are a country whose best, brightest and richest are steadily leaving because of an inept, thieving government.

    It would be naive to believe that there is any hope for the filipino nation if things remain as they are.
    Our best leaving? Our best athletes (like Pacquiao) have no plans of leaving. Our best professors are still teaching in schools like UP, Ateneo, AIM, lasalle. Our best executives are staying, getting six-figure monthly salaries.

    Our brightest leaving? Most of the summa ***** laude graduates in my year are still here. They went to the US and Europe temporarily to take their MS and PhDs but they're still here.

    Our richest leaving? Our bank has at least 2,000 chinese clients. They manages small businesses. Some of these businesses had been around since the end of world war 2. They're not leaving. The richest people here, the Zobels, the Lucio Tans, The Hery Sys and the John Gokongweis are still here. Some of them may hold dual citizenships but THEY'RE STILL HERE!
  • Some of them may hold dual citizenships but THEY'RE STILL HERE!
    You'd be pretty naive to believe that these people will be intent on keeping the bulk of their cash assets in a currency backed by a government who has shown ZERO intention of practicing fiscal discipline.
  • Some of them may hold dual citizenships but THEY'RE STILL HERE!
    You'd be pretty naive to believe that these people will be intent on keeping the bulk of their cash assets in a currency backed by a government who has shown ZERO intention of practicing fiscal discipline.
  • Some of them may hold dual citizenships but THEY'RE STILL HERE!
    You'd be pretty naive to believe that these people will be intent on keeping the bulk of their cash assets in a currency backed by a government who has shown ZERO intention of practicing fiscal discipline.
  • mac_bolan00mac_bolan00 PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    you talking about budget deficit? it's not from lack of competence or discipline and it's not always a bad thing. it's the best policy for the current president.

    businessmen's and fun managers' decision to split their investment to other instruments and countries are purely profit/risk in nature.

    wag ka nang humirit tungkol sa negosyo. malayo ito sa gusto mong palabasin.
  • Originally posted by bafana
    Why just blame the government? Can we, as Filipinos, not own up collectively the failure of this nation? The government is corrupt because the citizenry allowed it to be so. The citizenry is corrupted because it put corrupt politicians to run the government. And the cycle of blame goes on.

    It's so naive to blame one party yet not own up to our faults as well.

    Makasabat lang! From an overseas resident Pinoy perspective!I back the position of "bafana" when the specific point of responsibility was brought into the discussion.

    The Filipino is responsible for his/her destiny the Filipino chose his/her current state of being and if this state of being is in a chronic state of decay then it is due to the fact that the Filipino in the advance stages of decay has allowed himself/herself to decay due to a lack of vision and motivation.

    The casue of the rot in current society is a vicious circle where one sector tries to lay blame on another, but at the end of the day the Filipino society collectively drowns in its own cesspool.

    Having said the obvious what is the solution! The solution is a grass roots revolution to remove the existing status quo. Sometimes extricating people out of their comfort zones leads them to seriously consider their future. Just like those Pinoys who leave the country for greener pastures!

    I would like to believe that the solution to the Filipino's problems is beyond "academic posturing".
  • wag ka nang humirit tungkol sa negosyo. malayo ito sa gusto mong palabasin.
    Whatever. The point I'm trying to make is that philippine society is unable to maintain cohesiveness because of rotten, corrupt governance (the state of which can be blamed on the electorate).

    In addition to being unable to maximize our natural resources for our own benefit (which has been going on for a long time already - ever since 'independence' was achieved), now it is our financial and human resources that are being sucked out of the country for the benefit of other nations.

    This is not a solution, but a grave, grave problem. That light you imagine seeing at the end of the tunnel is your delusion.
  • mac_bolan00mac_bolan00 PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    you're not suffering from any illusions, just good old fashioned myopia. a country is never doomed. your scorecard can change in a year.
  • businessmen's and fun managers' decision to split their investment to other instruments and countries are purely profit/risk in nature.
    Foreign businessmen are willing to invest in the philippines because everything here is dirt cheap. They can afford a small risk of loss in exchange for the reward of controlling/monopolizing our market. This leverage is present by virture of their stronger currencies vis-a-vis the peso.

    Otoh, filipino businessmen are taking their money out of the country because they don't want to keep their assets in pesos and see it shrink daily thanks to inept governance/fiscal policy (read: corruption).
    you talking about budget deficit? it's not from lack of competence or discipline and it's not always a bad thing. it's the best policy for the current president.
    Indeed. Defaulting on our foreign debts is the best policy for the current president (or any president for that matter)...

    Sino kaya dito ang huwag dapat humirit tungkol sa negosyo...
  • mac_bolan00mac_bolan00 PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
    runung-runungan.

    a country can declare a payment moratorium anytime with or without the consent of the debtors. poland did it before. the US is still the biggest debtor country in the world and it keeps bolating its local and foreign debt.
  • Originally posted by mac_bolan00
    you're not suffering from any illusions, just good old fashioned myopia. a country is never doomed. your scorecard can change in a year.
    Sure. But it all depends on how the next president (if there will be one) decides to go about things. The trend in the last few years points towards what I have been talking about.

    Resources (financial or otherwise) and talent have been leaving the country, not coming in.
This discussion has been closed.