COMMUNITY NOTICE: If you are having trouble in your account access, please do send us a message at [email protected] for assistance.

what is the history of the bible

rickymrickym Member PEx Veteran ⭐⭐
i'm just curious
what is the history of the bible

1. around how many people wrote it? what kinds of people?
2. did jesus christ write any of it?
3. did anyone during the time of christ write any of it?
4. if it was written after christ's time how was it preserved from the time of christ to the time of writing?
5. how was the church at the time(politically etc.) of compilation, publication, translation of the bible.
6. most importantly how did the writers earn that 'title' of being 'divinely inspired' (i think that's the term) in which they can make no error when writing the bible

thanks

Comments

  • caporegimecaporegime ilpadrino lite™ PExer
  • caporegimecaporegime ilpadrino lite™ PExer
    It's about time you people snapped out of it. I'm retiring.
  • caporegimecaporegime ilpadrino lite™ PExer
    Or we'll all perish.
  • green gringreen grin Member PExer
    hello rickym! isn't it funny that after 15 years of instructions in a catholic institution we know next to nothing about the bible? but it's good that our curiosity gets the better of us and we start asking. and if you will allow me to share you my humble research in reply to your queries:
    Originally posted by rickym
    what is the history of the bible[/b]before i start i need to tell you that the catholic bible has 7 more books than the protestant bible. i don't know if you want to tackle this, but for now i'll await specific questions from you re this. for purposes of this "lesson" i will refer to the protestant bible.
    1. around how many people wrote it? what kinds of people?
    there is the short answer and there is the long answer:

    the easy answer is that the 66 books in the bible were written over a span of about 1500 years, by roughly 44 authors.

    the longer answer (and i’ll try to shorten it here) is that some of the books and letters which are attributed to certain people may not have actually been written with their own hand, but narrated to scribes or traveling companions who recorded their teachings, stories, etc.

    some answer this question by saying that the Holy Spirit is the author of the bible, which is true, but not complete. yes, it was the Spirit, moving through the hands, hearts and willing minds of those authors, but the author’s own writing style, talent, insight and focus cannot be totally discounted. the holy spirit worked through their talents, the same the way that the spirit still works through our talents today, yours and mine.

    the human authors were kings, prophets, fishermen, priests, peasants, scholars, doctors, rich men and poor. it was written in different places such as in the wilderness, in homes, in palaces and in prisons. it was written on 3 diffeent continents (asia, europe and africa). the original documents were written in the hebrew, aramaic and greek languages.
    2. did jesus christ write any of it?
    the short answer is: no, he didn't.
    3. did anyone during the time of christ write any of it?
    if you mean that if any of the gospels were written while christ was alive, no. the earliest gospel was reputedly written by matthew, an apostle (some believe by mark) and written sometime between 50 to 70 AD. (check this site for details: http://www.carm.org/questions/gospels_written.htm )
    4. if it was written after christ's time how was it preserved from the time of christ to the time of writing?
    it is believed that the first gospel was an oral gospel which was later written down in greek or aramaic. remember that the people who were preaching the gospel were actual eyewitnesses to the events and were the same persons who walked and talked with jesus christ. two of the gospels, however, were not written by eyewitnesses - mark and luke. mark was a disciple of peter, while the physician luke was a disciple of paul (also a non-eyewitnesses). interestingly, there are no contradictions in their writings with those of eyewitnesses matthew (the tax collector) and john (the disciple "whom jesus loved").
    5. how was the church at the time(politically etc.) of compilation, publication, translation of the bible.
    i'll try to answer the question from how i understand it:

    the church was a loosely-knit body of believers in jesus christ without any political clout at all. in fact they were persecuted by both the jews and the romans. by the jews because they believed that christians were blaspheming by saying that jesus is God (blaspheming is punishable by death). and by the romans because they require everyone under roman control to profess that "caesar is Lord" which the christians would not do.

    the apostles and their disciples went around jerusalem, judea samaria, and beyond preaching the gospel of jesus christ. and in some towns there grew a following which they nurtured. after they were instructed of the gospel of jesus, they would leave and move on to the next town. as it was with paul, he would constantly write to these "churches" extolling them continue with their walk.

    these letters by paul and the gospels constituted the body of works that was to be called the new testament.
    6. most importantly how did the writers earn that 'title' of being 'divinely inspired' (i think that's the term) in which they can make no error when writing the bible
    the writers did not earn any entitlement as to have their writings to be called divinely inspired. in short, not everything that say paul wrote automatically became scriptures. a short course in the canon of scriptures might be helpful in explaining this, rickym. if you will please indulge me:

    the word "canon" comes from a greek word that means "measuring stick". over time, the word came to be used metaphorically of books that were "measured" and thereby recognized as being God's Word. when we talk about the "canon of scripture" today, we ar referring to all the biblical books that colectively constitute God's Word.

    when the church formally recognizd what books belonged in the canon, there wer five primary tests that were applied. these tests were:

    1. was the book written or backed by a prophet or apostle of god?

    this is the single most important test. the reasoning here is that the Word of God, which is inspired by the Spirit of God for the people of God, must be communicated by a man of God. Deuteronomy 18:18 informs us that only a prophet of God will speak the Word of God. 2 Peter 1:20,21 assures us that scripture is only written by men of God.

    2. is the book authoritative?

    can it be said of this book as it was said of jesus, "the people were amazed at his teacing, because he taught them as one who had authority, not as the teachers of the law" (Mark 1:22)? does this book ring with the sense of "Thus saith the Lord"? is it brimming with divine authority?

    3. does the book tell the truth about God and doctrine as it is ALREADY known by previous revelation?

    the bereans searched the old testament scriptures to see whether paul's teaching was true, they knew that if paul's teaching did not agree with the old testament canon, it could not be of God. agreement with all earlier revelation is essential.

    4. does the book give evidence of having the power of god?

    the reasoning here is that any writing that does not exhibit the transforming power of god in the lives of its readers could not have come from God. scriptures says that the Word of God is "living and active" (hebrews 4:12). 2 Timothy 3:16,17 indicates that God's Word has a trasnforming effect. if the book in question does not have the power to change a life, then, it is reasoned, the book cannot have come from God.

    5. was the book acepted by the people of God?

    in old testament times, moses' scrolls were placed immediately into the ark of the covenant (deu 31:24-26). joshua's writings were added in the same fashion (joshua 24:26). in the new testament, paul thanked the thessalonians for receiving the message he preached as the Word of God (1 thessalonians 2:13). paul's letter, as i mentioned earlier, were circulated among the churches. it is the norm that God's people - that is, the majority of them and not simply a fraction - will initially receive God's Word as such.

    finally, many of the new testament books were recognized as scripture during the general time they were written. it is highly revealing tht in 1 Timothy 5:18, the apostle paul joined an old testament reference and called them BOTH (collectively) "scripture".

    to wit, rickym, the books weren't arbitrarily selected in order to force on christians a doctrine of their own making, rather the books were already considered scriptures, and the church merely "collated" them.

    hope my humble contribution above is helpful. please feel free to discuss further with me. thanks and god bless, rickym ;)
  • green gringreen grin Member PExer
    reviewing my above post, i messed up on the first question by mixing in my answer with the question.

    let me repost it:


    Originally posted by rickym

    what is the history of the bible?

    My answer:

    before i start i need to tell you that the catholic bible has 7 more books than the protestant bible. i don't know if you want to tackle this, but for now i'll await specific questions from you re this. for purposes of this "lesson" i will refer to the protestant bible.


    thank you, ricky.

Leave a Comment

BoldItalicStrikethroughOrdered listUnordered list
Emoji
Image
Align leftAlign centerAlign rightToggle HTML viewToggle full pageToggle lights
Drop image/file