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Heavy Oil Consumption

If a motorist comes to you and complains that his car consumes too much oil, what would you tell this motorist?
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  • It could be a number of things... he could have a leak through one of the many valves and sealants that keep the engine oil tight... he could have a busted valve seal and oil could be leaking into the combustion chamber through there... or he could be experiencing loose compression due to a degraded cylinder wall or a busted piston ring... or it could be a combination of any of the above... :|

    For the leak, you'll have to find it and tighten or replace whatever's causing the leak... if it's the valve seal, you'll have to replace the one in question, although you'll most likely change all (16 for most 4 cylinder cars...)... the loose compression is the hardest to deal with since this'll most likely require an overhaul... the cylinders will have to be rebored, the pistons/rings changed, seals, bearings, belts, and so on... some claim that loose comrpession can be solved with oil additives but I think that this is just a temporary solution and is risky IMHO... :|

    You can also try changing to a thicker grade of oil... that might solve it for a while... :|
  • baka kailangan tune up
  • My first thought would be an oil leak... internally (where your ride is burning oil) or externally (where its leaking oil).

    As aforementioned, using a thicker grade oil (i.e. 20w-40) helps prevent leaks in higher mileage engines... and its also better suited for our hot/humid weather as well.
  • Originally posted by holdenc
    baka kailangan tune up

    Oh? You did not say how a tune up can fix this.
  • Mokkori's post shows he has a good command of how a car engine works.

    But his analysis may be digging into this problem a little too deep.

    Slamm did mention changing to 20w40 in the effort to prevent leaks if any. He failed to mention how a thicker grade of oil would prevent leaks. But we are all in the right track.

    So let us begin again, this time assume that you are the mechanic in the shop, a motorist comes in and tells you his car is consuming oil a little too fast for him. What will be the first thing you will say?

    Note that the topic is a loaded one. So do not assume anything.
  • Originally posted by 3cylinder
    Slamm Di ba meron kanya kanyang mga grade ang mga pangkotse?o Iisa lang yun? Pwede ba yung (20w-40) sa kahit anong klase na kotse?

    The best source to find out what oil is best for your engine with some givens like climate condition is to check out the owners manual. It'll also give other info on what needs to be done during particular mileage intervals. :)

    In relation to the topic, our driver just told me this morning that the oil in my mom's car has suddenly dropped to less then half. Here are some givens:
    - I just changed the oil last month along with a tune-up (cleaned the plugs and the carb) and adjusted the timing so this means that the car might be consuming or leaking oil (we placed a little over 3++L of oil and the dipstick showed it was already full).
    - this is the first time it has happened with the car since we bought it over a year ago (maintained regularly since we bought it).
    - there are no oil leaks in the garage at this point nor are there any tell-tale signs in the engine area.
    - the cooling system/radiator has no signs of oil mixing with the coolant/water.
    - the vehicle is running perfectly, no erratic idling, weird noises, and no white or black smoke coming out even during high revs.

    Thus, the first thing we did was to top up the oil again and we'll be bringing the car to the gas station to lift it up to check for any leaks and to check out the oil drain plug and filter housing amongst some... We'll also be checking the spark plugs for any oil residue... If all comes out well, i'll be observing the car for another few weeks for any loss in oil. If it still losses oil without any leakage signs, i'll be bringning it to my mechanic for a operation and some testing.
  • Originally posted by hipshot
    So let us begin again, this time assume that you are the mechanic in the shop, a motorist comes in and tells you his car is consuming oil a little too fast for him. What will be the first thing you will say?

    Note that the topic is a loaded one. So do not assume anything.

    Simple...

    "Sir, i-check up ko muna ang kotse"

    With that kind of problem, there are a number of possible causes for it. And the only way to determine this is to get down and dirty.
  • Originally posted by mazdamazda
    Simple...

    "Sir, i-check up ko muna ang kotse".

    Or we can pretend that you're a mechanic in some casa and say, "nako po ser, kelangan na ibaba yung makina, buksan, at palitan lahat ng seals at gasket"... gumagamit po kayo ng synthetic?" ;)
  • Originally posted by hipshot
    So let us begin again, this time assume that you are the mechanic in the shop, a motorist comes in and tells you his car is consuming oil a little too fast for him. What will be the first thing you will say?

    Note that the topic is a loaded one. So do not assume anything.

    Hehehehe... this is one of the more unique RPGs I'd have to go along with in a while I must say... okay... lesseee... :|

    First thing I'd say... "When was the last oil change?"
    ... from here on I proceed to check if the oil is indeed below level... then I check under the car and around the engine seams to see if there are any external leaks... I can check the odometer as well to see the mileage on the car to get a guesstimate of the cars age... I'd also check the plugs to look for any evidence such as carbon residue on the tips that would suggest loose compression or bad fuel burning... I ask the grade of oil and how much does the motorist put in every time he sees that the car is eating oil... I ask if he's using any additives and so on... other than that, I'd have to be able to observe the engine over a week or two of regular driving to assess what the problem really is... :|

    ... this could get really long... car problems can be caused by any of the jillion moving parts in the thing. :eek:
  • Originally posted by Mokkori
    Hehehehe... this is one of the more unique RPGs I'd have to go along with in a while I must say... okay... lesseee... :|

    First thing I'd say... "When was the last oil change?"
    ... from here on I proceed to check if the oil is indeed below level... then I check under the car and around the engine seams to see if there are any external leaks... I can check the odometer as well to see the mileage on the car to get a guesstimate of the cars age... I'd also check the plugs to look for any evidence such as carbon residue on the tips that would suggest loose compression or bad fuel burning... I ask the grade of oil and how much does the motorist put in every time he sees that the car is eating oil... I ask if he's using any additives and so on... other than that, I'd have to be able to observe the engine over a week or two of regular driving to assess what the problem really is... :|

    ... this could get really long... car problems can be caused by any of the jillion moving parts in the thing. :eek:

    Now you are talking, Mokk,

    keep it up. You may be up for a medal for this.

    Good thinking!


    hint: how much oil consumption do you think is normal?:?:
  • Originally posted by mazdamazda
    Simple...

    "Sir, i-check up ko muna ang kotse"

    With that kind of problem, there are a number of possible causes for it. And the only way to determine this is to get down and dirty.

    OOOps! You already assumed that there is a problem....
  • Slamm,

    less than half the crankcase capacity, or less than half a liter?
  • I was referring to the crankcase capacity... it was around half more or less. I checked the car again this morning and its still OK. No leaks yet as well...
  • Originally posted by slamm
    I was referring to the crankcase capacity... it was around half more or less. I checked the car again this morning and its still OK. No leaks yet as well...

    Let's see now...... at half the crankcase capacity, most japanese cars would have about 2 liters of oil left.

    The engine may start to emit bird-like chirping sounds in this situation.

    It is possible that not enough oil was in the crankcase to start with, or your dipstick reading was taken when your car was on an incline, or immediately after shut-down, or both.

    If there has been no leak after, do you have any idea where the oil goes?
  • Originally posted by hipshot
    hint: how much oil consumption do you think is normal?:?:

    Depends... a running engine will burn a certain amount of oil no matter how minute it is but most factory fresh engines shouldn't consume enough oil to warrant adding more before the next oil change (5k km at most intervals for me...) since most factory fresh engines are pre-broken in before retail, and things like the piston rings and valve seals should be happily sitting in their new home all cozy, oil leaking into the combustion chamber is unlikely...

    On a newly non-factory overhauled engine, it can be expected to eat up to about a litter during the first 1k kms... also depends on how well the engine is broken in or how long it takes for the parts to adhere to their ideal fitting within the engine (... the quality of the parts used in the overhaul will play a large role in this...)... in some cases, it can keep on consuming oil up to 3k, but beyond this, it shouldn't raise any concern as long as the engine is broken in properly, good parts were used, and a good mechanic put the thing together... a botched up break in could mean that the engine could eat up as much as 2L of oil every 1k kms...

    On a relatively old engine, it'll really depend as well... especially on the maintenance history of the car... but even a 10 year old engine shouldn't eat up enough oil to cause concern if it was cared for properly... heck, I've seen 25 year old engines still run like clockwork because it was cared for by very meticulous people... the kind of oil can also be in question but most new cars shouldn't have a problem with thinner grade oils as long as the right type of oil was used for the particular engine (i.e. gasoline, diesel...) the possibilities are really numerous... loose compression, leaks, broken seals, and so on... :eek:
  • DunedainDunedain PEx Influencer ⭐⭐⭐
    Originally posted by Mokkori
    On a relatively old engine, it'll really depend as well... especially on the maintenance history of the car... but even a 10 year old engine shouldn't eat up enough oil to cause concern if it was cared for properly... heck, I've seen 25 year old engines still run like clockwork because it was cared for by very meticulous people... the kind of oil can also be in question but most new cars shouldn't have a problem with thinner grade oils as long as the right type of oil was used for the particular engine (i.e. gasoline, diesel...) the possibilities are really numerous... loose compression, leaks, broken seals, and so on... :eek:

    Very true. Making sure that all seals and gaskets all over (the engine) don't leak one way or another guarantees the engine a longer lifespan. My father is one of those many who are meticulous when it comes to the car since he still drives an old Mitsubishi Galant (somewhere in the early-mid 80s model).
  • Originally posted by Mokkori
    ........... that the engine could eat up as much as 2L of oil every 1k kms...

    .. :eek:

    2l per 1000 km is just about right for a V8.

    Or 1l per 500 km, just about the time that the driver of this car pulls up to get gas.

    For engines less than 3.2 l in size, this is a little too much in oil consumption. A lot of these engines (4-cyl mostly) have only about 3 3/4 l of oil in the crankcase, 1/2 l of which is in the oil filter already.

    If the small engine consumes 1 l per 500 km, it might just be in trouble in a very short time.

    If the motorist say that he does put 1 l of oil every time he pulls up to a gas station, one question to ask him might be if he notices his muffler to emit black liquid or sooty exhaust.

    Another question would be if he notices black drippings on that spot where he usually parks.

    If YOU yourself notice that his engine does not sound good, where do you think the problem would be.

    BTW, this situation does not in anyway involve additives or anything else.

    Additives, or anything in the oil itself, do not prevent leaks. They may reduce leaks, but not stop these altogether.
  • Originally posted by hipshot
    It is possible that not enough oil was in the crankcase to start with, or your dipstick reading was taken when your car was on an incline, or immediately after shut-down, or both.

    The incline part also hit me just this morning when i passed by the place where the oil was changed. The place we did the change the last time around had a slight incline as the usual spot we did the oil change in had a stalled car that time. Its been a few days since we refilled and the dipstick is still at the max point.

    Pretty intersting topic if i may add. :) I have a friend with an old B12 Sentra (boxtype) and its engine is still running very well to this date. The emissions tester could not even believe the exhaust level that he detected.
  • Originally posted by slamm

    Pretty intersting topic if i may add. :) I have a friend with an old B12 Sentra (boxtype) and its engine is still running very well to this date. The emissions tester could not even believe the exhaust level that he detected.

    A boxtype Nissan Sentra B12?

    You're not pulling my leg, are you?

    What year was this made?
  • Why will i pull your leg? :) The body is in really bad condition but the engine is running very well (and has some slight mods to it as well)...
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