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Boo-Boos During the Mutiny

Here's the Inquirer's

Top 10 bloopers during
the mutiny watch
Posted: 6:05 PM (Manila Time) | Aug. 02, 2003
Inquirer News Service

THOSE of you who stayed glued to the television or kept the radio on last weekend when a group of angry young men from the military holed up at the Oakwood Premier will agree that it was the best of times and the worst of times for all of us, but much more obviously for the Philippine media.

10. ABS-CBN's Ces Drilon screaming like a market vendor, "Puwesto namin yan! Puwesto namin yan!" when the rest of the media people entered Oakwood for the press conference.

9. "We just saw Jaime Zobel," Ces Drilon again, referring to Fernando Zobel who visited the family-owned Oakwood. Isn't she supposedly an expert on "Pipol"?

8. GMA-7's Jessica Soho and other media people stopping foreigners on their way out of Oakwood at the start of the siege and asking them, "How are you?"

7. Foreigners walking out of Oakwood like they just came from a tea party with the rebels. "I'm okay." "I'm fine, thank you." "They were very kind." "They were very nice." And then stopping to pose before the tanks for souvenir photos.

6. Foreigners walking out of Oakwood hand in hand with, ahem, hospitality girls (from Makati Avenue and the environs?).

5. Mikey Arroyo cracking a joke in the middle of the crisis when asked if his family was able to sleep that Saturday: "Hindi nga kasi iyak nang iyak 'yung anak ko."

4. "Si Senator Vic Sotto," Malaca?ang Deputy Chief of Staff Rene Velasco, talking about Senator Tito Sotto on radio.

3. RPN-9's Madam Ratsa repeatedly referring to Oakwood as "Oakland" hotel and Channel 2's Tony Velasquez referring to Trillanes as "Lt. Senior Grade Trillenas" innumerable times.

2. The President cackling right before giving her "the crisis is over" speech, obviously gloating, just a jiggle short of Tessie Aquino Oreta after the "No" vote during the Erap impeachment trial.

1. Karen Davila virtually ditching her journalistic objectivity and imploring Trillanes, et al, on-air voice nearly breaking, to agree to a dialogue with Defense Secretary Angelo Reyes, who was waiting on the other line. A news anchor-cum-negotiator? Only in the Philippines.
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Comments

  • simonesezsimonesez Spearo Schmero PExer
    The biggest blunder of all is that the the flag used by the "Magdalo" was Andres Bonifacio's flag and therefore, the "Magdiwang's."

    Bunch o' amateurs can't even get their flag right.

    Thanks to Ambeth Ocampo for reminding us:


    Lost in bits and pieces


    ROUSED from sleep at 3 a.m. by cellular-phone text messages and calls regarding a new coup attempt in Makati City, I sat in front of the TV and got a ringside seat to history as it unfolded. However, an hour of watching, shifting channels more than usual, I started to wonder whether we were getting bits and pieces rather than the whole picture. The crew of various TV stations caught the efficient men in military uniforms calmly planting bombs in the carpark of the Glorietta commercial complex. Naturally, the scene brought back memories of previous coup attempts during the term of President Cory Aquino, but this turned out to be something else.

    To the uninitiated, military uniforms look alike, and it was disappointing that none of the TV reporters were industrious enough to try and make distinctions between the name patches, insignia, etc. Without intelligent commentary, viewers for a while were just as clueless as the reporters. Then they noticed the armbands and proceeded to describe what we could already see on video footage. I presume the redundancy was for the radio audience who could only hear and not see what was going on.

    So the bands were red, had a white sun on which was emblazoned the letter "I." It took awhile for somebody to guess that this was not a letter "H" either, but the pre-colonial Philippine symbol for "Ka."

    Despite being standard textbook information, something simple you get asked in elimination rounds at TV game shows, it took awhile for TV reporters to connect the armbands to one of the flags of the Philippine Revolution of 1896. Maybe I expect too much but I would like to believe that Filipinos do not need a Ph.D. in history to know that this armband was based on the Katipunan flag, that the letter on the sun is from the pre-colonial Philippine syllabary or "baybayin," not "alibata," which is a 20th-century invented word and does not exist in early Philippine dictionaries.

    During the 1998 Philippine Centennial, these flags dominated the landscape forming part of a set mistakenly described as "Evolution of the Philippine Flag." We can partly blame the Philippine Post for miseducating the public with a series of stamps showcasing the different flags of the revolution and calling it the evolution of our flag.

    If this were so, we would find it hard to place Mariano Llanera's flag-the black field with a white "K" beside the terrifying skull and crossbones. The symbol on armbands worn by the "mutineers" was Andres Bonifacio's flag, yet nobody commented on the paradox in the name of the group. "Magdalo," as every schoolboy knows, was the Katipunan faction in Cavite province associated with Emilio Aguinaldo. Why not be consistent and be called "Magdiwang" instead? During the 1897 Tejeros Convention in Cavite, when Bonifacio was asked to preside over the formation of a revolutionary government to replace the Katipunan, he pointed to this flag, explained its symbolism, particularly the pre-colonial character "Ka," which is short for "Kalayaan."

    History is not as simple as it seems, and scholars, like Reynaldo Ileto, have pointed out that while "kalayaan" [freedom] is sometimes used interchangeably with "independencia" [independence], there is a world of difference in the way these words are translated -- and in the way these words affected different Filipinos of different socio-economic classes. From this simple iconographic symbol flowed numerous historical allusions that were not picked up by the media.

    Worse, the message these young men were trying to communicate did not get across very clearly because media and the public were not listening. Viewers expected some action and were both relieved and disappointed that there was no bloodshed. Thus, the choppy footage and the breathless, sometimes excitable reportage were unnecessary. Rather than calm the public, the opposite was achieved. The difference between reporting on TV and reporting in print is that talking is spontaneous while the act of writing forces one to be more sober, to collect one's thoughts. But then isn't journalism supposed to be history in a hurry?

    We had a national emergency unfolding and the government station NBN-4 was literally off the air, leaving coverage to the competing giants, ABS-CBN Broadcasting and GMA Network. These stations were on the scene at dawn and kept reporting till midday when they switched to commercial programs. Imagine that while idealistic young military men put their lives and careers on the line to focus our attention on corruption in the military, one channel had Inday Badiday pinching Piolo Pascual, while the other had young people gyrating as if nothing important was happening in Makati. Those blessed with cable TV watched something else.

    The boring parade of politicians swearing their allegiance to the government of President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo was made lively by former president Fidel Ramos, one of the few who made sense and injected humor in an otherwise drab day. Someone asked if President Macapagal-Arroyo lost sleep. Ramos replied that you don't ask a woman how much sleep she got. A reporter commented that President Macapagal-Arroyo appeared fresh when she gave her statement in the morning. Ramos replied, "All presidents should look fresh when they face the media." A reporter asked Ramos: If you were president how would you handle this? Ramos refused to answer the hypothetical question.

    Live TV coverage was like seven blind men holding various parts of an elephant's anatomy, each describing what he touched but nobody getting the complete picture. Fortunately, historians of the future will give a better picture armed with hindsight and perspective.
  • simonesezsimonesez Spearo Schmero PExer
    I made a search on the flag issue as I had my doubts also.

    I found out:

    - That the flag in question was allegedly used after the merger of Magdalo and Magdiwang.Link here


    - Bonifacio indeed made the "K" (mistaken as I, refer to Ambeth's article above) flag evidenced by references to Katipunan and Katagalugan, Bonifacio's group and term of revolutionary government respectively:

    The Katagalugan government carried over the symbols and teachings of the Katipunan, which the people accepted as the revolutionary authority. This government was democratic in principle, orientation and form. At its inception, it was formed by representatives from the provinces where the Katipunan had a mass-based membership. It adopted as its national standard the Katipunan’s red flag with a white sun with the Tagalog letter "Ka" in the center and commissioned Julio Nakpil to compose the national anthem, "Marangal na Dalit ng Katagalugan."

    In defining "Tagalog" as the term for all Filipinos, and "Katagalugan" as the country’s name in lieu of "Filipinas" which had colonial origins, Bonifacio and the Katipunan sought to define a national identity.


    Link here

    - This flag is indeed known as the Magdiwang flag and used by the Katipunan faction in Cavite and notably used by Aguinaldo until he signed the Biak-na-Bato treaty. Link here

    I'm inclined to believe Ambeth Ocampo on this. Any input?
  • simonesezsimonesez Spearo Schmero PExer
    How about that Abner Mercado touching and walking all over the booby-trapped bombs getting reprimanded by his own cameraman to watch the **** out for the thermoexplosive device!
  • boardbusterboardbuster Banned by Admin PExer
    I guess the event tested the professionalism and composure of the TV newsmedia. They all got a long way to go.
  • husky150husky150 Sugar Daddy PExer
    I agree that the behavior of the media during the coverage of that event was, for the most part, boorish and unprofessional. Hayan, kaya tuloy nabulyawan sila sa loob ng Oakwood hehehee :rotfl:

    At any rate, I've always imagined Jessica Soho to be a breed apart, but yeah, when she was ambush interviewing those evacuating guests, nagmistulan siyang field reporter ng The Buzz. The first two lines below are excerpts from her actual "interview". The last line is what I almost expected to hear:

    Jessica Soho (to evacuating foreign guest): Hello, sir, how are you?
    Foreign Guest: Fine, thank you.
    Jessica Soho: Define "LOVE"

    :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl:
  • ShofixtiShofixti Frustrated Painter PExer
    Another boo boo was when a reporter said that the letter on the Magdalo flag was "H" when it was infact "I" of "Ka" (which stands for Kalayaan...I think).

    :lol:
  • ShofixtiShofixti Frustrated Painter PExer
    Speaking of which...here is the flag so that those "unaware" can understand.

    flag05.jpg

    g7.gif
  • simonesezsimonesez Spearo Schmero PExer
    Originally posted by husky150
    I agree that the behavior of the media during the coverage of that event was, for the most part, boorish and unprofessional. Hayan, kaya tuloy nabulyawan sila sa loob ng Oakwood hehehee :rotfl:

    At any rate, I've always imagined Jessica Soho to be a breed apart, but yeah, when she was ambush interviewing those evacuating guests, nagmistulan siyang field reporter ng The Buzz. The first two lines below are excerpts from her actual "interview". The last line is what I almost expected to hear:

    Jessica Soho (to evacuating foreign guest): Hello, sir, how are you?
    Foreign Guest: Fine, thank you.
    Jessica Soho: Define "LOVE"

    :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl:

    Did she remember to ask his favorite color:D
  • simonesezsimonesez Spearo Schmero PExer
    Originally posted by boardbuster
    I guess the event tested the professionalism and composure of the TV newsmedia. They all got a long way to go.

    Yup, events like this separate the chaff from the grain. It can either break you, look at these pathetic "journal-eeks"; or make you, like Alvin Alchico (sp. pls.).
  • simonesezsimonesez Spearo Schmero PExer
    Originally posted by Shofixti
    Another boo boo was when a reporter said that the letter on the Magdalo flag was "H" when it was infact "I" of "Ka" (which stands for Kalayaan...I think).

    :lol:

    Or maybe the wearer of the armband was on R&R and was on reclining position, sleeping the mutiny away when said reporter saw his armband:D Then again it's the responsibility of the reporter to know these things or to look for info about his subject.

    The major networks can avoid gaffes like these by hiring only individuals with well-rounded education. Instead of the baritone vocals or generic mestiza look maybe they can look for people with sufficient knowledge in history, current events, humanities, etc. Unless one of these networks is planning to field the media guy/gal to a national position again, then mass appeal is the way to go. And then we'll have more of these coup-medy in the background :p :p :p
  • C_thereaC_therea Member PExer
    I get the impression that broadcast journalists think they could get away with spontaneity which only betrays the lack of preparation including making time to study the antecedents to the event they are covering. The result is mindless questions that muddle the truth.

    News and Public Affairs should not just be talk.

    I don't recall even among veteran broadcast journalists making a distinction between mutiny, coup d etat, and rebellion which is elementary to the understanding of the situation. If at all, they have added to blurring the lines.
  • sadirmatasadirmata saluyot freak PExer
    'kala ko ba "best and brightest" 'tong mga officers na 'to? wala naman palang alam sa philippine history? ni di man lang nag-research ukol sa mga katipunan flags na ginamit nila sa stupid armband nila? e di ba magaling mag thesis thesis yang si trillanes? :cool:
  • dingdongdingdingdongding edsa dos palpak PExer
    Originally posted by sadirmata
    'kala ko ba "best and brightest" 'tong mga officers na 'to? wala naman palang alam sa philippine history? ni di man lang nag-research ukol sa mga katipunan flags na ginamit nila sa stupid armband nila? e di ba magaling mag thesis thesis yang si trillanes? :cool:

    si brad talaga. i-base ba daw sa katipunan flags ang pagiging best and brightest ng isang sundalo.
  • schumischumi F1 Weltm?ister PExer
    nakikinig ako sa radyo nun, brownout kasi dahil sa malakas na kidlat at ulan

    ang sabi ng isa sa mga sundalo:
    "Majority ng mga Pilipino, walang tsinelas!!!"

    gumagaralgal pa yung boses...

    hehe. baka naman yung kalahati, nakabare-foot lang. o di kaya, naka-shoes lagi. o di kaya, naka-socks lang pagdating sa bahay:D
  • helmethelmet der Kaiser PExer
    Originally posted by simonesez
    Live TV coverage was like seven blind men holding various parts of an elephant's anatomy, each describing what he touched but nobody getting the complete picture. Fortunately, historians of the future will give a better picture armed with hindsight and perspective.

    Very well said. The radio reporters together with their panting, lost of breath, hysteria while they're making their reports on air never cease to amaze me. The rebels didn't want to use the name of "magdiwang" probably because at the end, it was Bonifacio who got "bumped off" by Aguinaldo. They probably should've used a different flag representing "magdalo".
  • sadirmatasadirmata saluyot freak PExer
    Originally posted by dingdongding
    si brad talaga. i-base ba daw sa katipunan flags ang pagiging best and brightest ng isang sundalo.

    di naman do'n iba-base. pero siyempre, nang pag-isipan at planuhin ang magiging pangalan ng grupo nila, hindi sila basta dumampot o nag-decide ng isang partikular na pangalan. nire-research din siyempre. lalo na't si trillanes ay research-oriented (basahin mo yung mga thesis niya sa pcij). either na nagkamali sila o wala talaga silang gaanong kaalaman sa philippine history.
  • simonesezsimonesez Spearo Schmero PExer
    Originally posted by dingdongding
    si brad talaga. i-base ba daw sa katipunan flags ang pagiging best and brightest ng isang sundalo.

    In a profession overly dependent on precision, perfection of combat and various skills and most of all accuracy of information for the purpose of life preservation, such as the soldiery, glaring errors like this could cost you a lot most in terms of credibility. As it is analysts are claiming that the Magdalo's charges against the government are preposterous if not downright improbable (I wouldn't say impossible, this country never ceases to amuse, err, amaze me) couple that with mistaken representation, i.e., flag vis-a-vis name of group you have a nation scratching their heads.:confused:
  • simonesezsimonesez Spearo Schmero PExer
    Originally posted by helmet
    Very well said. The radio reporters together with their panting, lost of breath, hysteria while they're making their reports on air never cease to amaze me. The rebels didn't want to use the name of "magdiwang" probably because at the end, it was Bonifacio who got "bumped off" by Aguinaldo. They probably should've used a different flag representing "magdalo".

    Ah brad kung ang tinutukoy mo ay yong article, si Ambeth Ocampo ng Inquirer ang nagsulat niya. Salamat.
  • simonesezsimonesez Spearo Schmero PExer
    Speaking of Andres Bonifacio, I was watching Insider in TFC last night. They were talking to the owner of the flag shop in Rizal Ave. where the "Magdalo" flags were commissioned. She was explaining that a soldier-looking dude asked her to make an order of flags allegedly for the Independence Day school celebrations. The guy said he wanted the "I" (K-Kalayaan) flag but he wanted the wavy sun from the KKK flag to replace the static-rayed one. The lady, obviously an authority on these matters, replied that it simply is not correct. The guy replied to this effect: "Sarili naming flag yan." Now here's the clincher: both flags, i.e., KKK flag and "I" flag are Magdiwang flags commissioned by the now infamous, you got it, "Magdalo group." That's two strikes soldier!:mad:
  • simonesezsimonesez Spearo Schmero PExer
    Originally posted by C_therea
    I get the impression that broadcast journalists think they could get away with spontaneity which only betrays the lack of preparation including making time to study the antecedents to the event they are covering. The result is mindless questions that muddle the truth.

    News and Public Affairs should not just be talk.

    I don't recall even among veteran broadcast journalists making a distinction between mutiny, coup d etat, and rebellion which is elementary to the understanding of the situation. If at all, they have added to blurring the lines.

    Think Korina Sanchez saying on national and international TV: "Indonesia is now the largest exporter of IT manpower in the world." A staff was heard whispering in the background, then she said: "India is now..." Oh well, at least she wasn't mouthing "ispesyal" in baritone.:rotfl:
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