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Talakayang GMAT | Graduate Management Admission Test

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  • jabonggs,

    business schools require the GMAT and will most likely reject GRE results as far as MBA applications are concerned.
  • like how hard is this test?
  • Originally posted by fanfan
    like how hard is this test?

    The GMAT is an aptitude test like the SAT or GRE. Its sections include analytical writing, verbal and quantitative exams. Being an aptitude test, the issue is not so much how hard the test is but rather how high can you score relative to other examinees applying to the same business schools that you're targeting. Even if the questions are "easy" for you, it is possible that many other applicants would have found the same test "easy" and scored higher than you, thereby increasing the competition to get into your target school.
  • rabbaddal: i see....thank you! but for most examinees, do u have an idea how they find the test? is it something that u have to review for?

    kasi the toefl test naman i heard there's really no need for a review because it's easy.
  • fanfan,

    That would depend on the applicant profile of the school that you're targeting. In top-tier MBA programs, GMAT scores averaged as high as 710 a couple of years ago. Today, the score could likely be even higher. Then, there are some schools where GMAT scores average around 650 or less.

    It doesn't hurt to review, and if you're aiming for a decent program (ex. w/in top 20 of BusinessWeek rankings), then reviewing is practically a must. How much you should review depends entirely on your capabilities. There are some people that can get by with a couple of review manuals while others might find enrolling in a review class like Kaplan very helpful. At the end of the day, what will matter to your application is your score.
  • Fanfan,

    If you are interested in attending a very good business school, you will have to put as much time and effort necessary to get the desired grade. Just think of it as an investment in time and money because the test is expensive.

    I have not taken the ACET,DLSUCET OR UPCAT but trust me the GMAT is harder. It has to be because you are competing with thousands of college students around the world hoping to attend the top B school in the States. It will also test you stamina because the test is administered from 8:00 AM to noon.

    I bet you Rabbaddal and Victory spent at least 2-3 months of intensive reviewing before taking the test. It is cheaper to put the time reviewing for the test until you score consistently the grade you are hoping for. The alternative is re-taking the exams and as I have said, mahal ang test.
  • I put in 100 hours of review before I felt I was prepared for the GMAT. I did well enough to get into a decent school.

    If you think you are smarter than I am, then lower this estimate accordingly. If you put in less hours and end up scoring lower than expected or desired, no one else to blame but yourself.
  • Originally posted by YFU'ER


    I bet you Rabbaddal and Victory spent at least 2-3 months of intensive reviewing before taking the test. It is cheaper to put the time reviewing for the test until you score consistently the grade you are hoping for. The alternative is re-taking the exams and as I have said, mahal ang test.

    One month lang for me, but with the burden of a full-time job. Given that I could review only 3 - 4 hours a night, that should have amounted to a little more than 100 hours for me.
  • thanks so much for all your answers... but i'm also considering taking up grad school in australia now kasi it's a lot cheaper...almost half the price of US grad schools. tapos it only takes a year as compared to 2 years in US.
  • Originally posted by fanfan
    thanks so much for all your answers... but i'm also considering taking up grad school in australia now kasi it's a lot cheaper...almost half the price of US grad schools. tapos it only takes a year as compared to 2 years in US.

    Where do you plan to work and what do you plan to do after you get your MBA?
  • fanfan,

    Also, what do you expect to get out of an MBA program - your immediate and long-term goals?

    This is not limited to just career advancement goals. It can be something that's not career-related such as learning experience and the likes.
  • victory: after MBA or any masters degree, probably get a job... preferably in the USA. would a masters degree from australia be recognized in US?

    rabbaddal: read from another thread that u recently graduated from columbia...u must be good to be able to study and better yet GRADUATE from an ivy league school. congrats to u.

    Rabbaddal: I know... but I my purpose of getting an MBA or any other masters degree is to get a good job....not here in manila...but in USA.
  • Originally posted by fanfan

    Rabbaddal: I know... but I my purpose of getting an MBA or any other masters degree is to get a good job....not here in manila...but in USA.

    Thanks for being candid and explicit about what you expect from a US MBA program – “to get a job in the USA”.

    Most people applying to top-tier MBA programs know that finding work in “this-and-that” specific country know that this is a complicated process, and do not factor this into their expectiations.

    Many b-schools expect the US economy to improve significantly in the coming months, enough to lift the MBA job market. However, you have to temper this expectation with the moot-and-academic reality that the US – and any country outside the US for that matter – have work authorization restrictions. The US, in particular, has a quota on the annual number of work (H1) visas it can issue to foreigners. The number was reduced to 65,000 from 200,000. These visas are usually oversubscribed and most of them are allocated to professionals such as engineers and doctors. Only an act of Congress can increase this quota, something unlikely to happen in the near future considering that this is a political process.

    Furthermore, even if more H1 visas were available, US immigration laws make it difficult for companies to sponsor foreign employees. Companies will have to justify why they should hire a foreigner for any given position instead of a US resident/citizen. Given that many corporate job positions have vague descriptions (as opposed to doctors, for example, whose skills can be articulated clearly and where the demand for whom can be explicitly measured), it is difficult for these companies to really make a justification for an H1 petition. As a result, many companies do not even bother to consider non-US applicants even if they have MBA degrees from top programs.

    What this means for those whose primary goal is to find work in the US is that even if the US economy and job market improves, the prospect for non-US MBA students of finding work in the US may not improve with the job market. The same is true for those who plan to look for work in other regions such as Europe, ANZ and East Asia.

    However, the door is not entirely shut. In exceptional cases, foreigners can still find work in countries other than their own. Investment banks and strategy consulting firms, for example, generally sponsor work permits of foreign hires. However, you must first think about whether or not you would want to work in these industries, and understand that because of their tendency to sponsor foreigners (and the high salaries), getting into such companies is extremely competitive. Nowadays, most i-banks require MBA hires to have a few years pre-MBA i-banking experience. Another strategy is to find some other way to secure a green card before you enter an MBA program. Some of my foreign-born classmates got their green cards as engineers, doctors, nurses, through relatives and the likes so they had an easier time finding jobs after they graduated. There are many ways to play by the exception but one thing you will have to understand is that the ball will be in your hands – most b-school career services offices cannot help you navigate through these exceptions.

    The first thing you can do is to be flexible with your expectations. If you do not have a green card, consider the very likely (but not impossible) prospect of not finding work in the US (or any other country outside the Philippines). Will a top-tier US MBA program still be as attractive to you? Will you still want to assume a lot of personal debt and give up a good job for an MBA?

    If you’re still determined, then be ready to do a lot of homework. During MBA info. sessions, ask speakers if they know of any initiatives in their schools that could help you find work in the US. Do not be swayed with motherhood answers (“We expect the US economy to improve”) or anecdotes (“Mr. So-and-so landed a job in Goldman”) because what happens to the US job market in general, or to other specific people, may not necessarily apply to you. Probe deeper – what industries are hiring foreigners? What qualifications and backgrounds to these successful hires have outside of an MBA that could have influenced their hiring? If the answers don’t look good to you, you might want to do your own research on how you can improve your chances – and you might just discover that getting an MBA may not be the only, or best, option.

    Always keep in mind that these days, the ball will be in your hands as far as finding a job is concerned. Ask yourself if you are still willing to make a significant investment despite these prospects. Or maybe there could be some other reason why you would want to pursue an MBA.
  • Originally posted by fanfan
    victory: after MBA or any masters degree, probably get a job... preferably in the USA. would a masters degree from australia be recognized in US?

    In line with what rabbaddal has already contributed above, the chances of a masters degree from Australia being "recognized" in the US job market -- without a US work permit -- is very small, given the number of US masters degree holders potentially competing for the same jobs. So the question then becomes (1) do you have a US work permit or (2) what kind of jobs are you willing to take on?

    If it's the most junior entry-level administrative job you can find, you might be able to land one. But then why would you need a masters degree from Australia for that? Just try your luck in the US with your current college degree and see where that takes you.

    There are other ways of getting a job in the US but again, the question is what kind of job interests you.
  • Help! Do you know of any GMAT review school here in the Phils? Also, where can I apply for the test? Thanks!
  • @fanfan,

    You also have to consider that your school will help you get those internships in companies/industries that you want. Getting your MBA in New York would probably increase your chances of getting an internship in a major Investment Bank like Goldman, Merrill, and JP Morgan Chase. These banks are headquartered in NY and they would likely recruit the top grads from the local MBA programs.

    Getting your MBA in Boston would increase the chances of getting into investment management because of the large number of investment management companies headquartered there. Fidelity (FMR Corp.) is the giant headquartered there.

    The big question is: Are companies willing to hire you even for their internship programs?
  • Help! Do you know of any GMAT review school here in the Phils? Also, where can I apply for the test? Thanks!

    KAPLAN has GMAT reviews here in Manila. Unfortunately, it is expensive. There's a KAPLAN center here in Makati. I don't know the specific address though.

    You can apply online at www.gmat.org.
  • Prof. UmbridgeProf. Umbridge PEx Rookie ⭐
    chip-L2, thanks for the info! :)
  • Prof. UmbridgeProf. Umbridge PEx Rookie ⭐
    chip-L2 wrote:
    @fanfan,

    The big question is: Are companies willing to hire you even for their internship programs?

    This is what I am afraid of. :depressed:
  • Just took the GMAT here in the US coz i'm planning to get into the top 10 B-schools!

    Let me tell you this!

    1) What makes the test hard ? It's an endurance challenge, that's what it is...imagine sitting in front of a computer for at least 3 1\2 hours flexing every inch of brain muslce, trying to determine whether a or b is sufficient while also remebering every technical rule of grammar and diction...it drains you man!

    2) the questions depend on whether you get the previous one right...so that means, if you get the first one right, the CAT increases the level of difficulty for the next one...if you get it wrong, they assume you're stupid and bring it down a level...

    3)the questions are definitely MUCH MUCH harder than entrance exams for UP, DLSU, ADMU ..even harder than the SATs and ACTs here in the US- that's from ETS who made all these standardized tests- and I tell you, they're telling the truth...

    Stanford GMAT averages 720 (ranked 1)
    Harvard 690 (ranked 4)
    MIT 700 (ranked 3)
    Wharton 700 (ranked 2)

    But the competition is fierce, Harvard's MBA receives thousands of applicants, and I believe last semester, they only took 15 for the new MBA class

    to complement your GMAT score, you must have:

    a high GPA- preferrably 3.818 (the cut-off for Summa ***** Laude Latin honors)

    work experience - at least 1 or 2 years (but this is relative, i mean in the new batch of MBA students at Harvard, one student was fresh out of his undergraduate degree)

    impressive recommendation- by esteemed faculty, employer...

    I got a 710 (95 percentile) for my first take... and I have yet to consider what school to go to...


    And always Pray! It does wonders!
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