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  1. #1

    Post Filipino's deteriorating proficiency in English

    Filipino’s deteriorating proficiency in English

    So what is wrong with the Philippines, anyway? Why is it that the Filipino's proficiency in the english language is deteriorating.?What is the Philippine government doing to stop and reverse this trend from going any further? Are there anyone in the government that is taking this problem seriously and making it a national issue-- or are the people in government just doesn't care and doesn't have a clue to what's happening to the system.

    The Philippines likes to pride itself as one of the nation whose got one of the largest population of english speakers in the world, but yet at the same time the Philippines is doing nothing to maintain and fortify that edge that people likes to talk about. While the asian countries like Singapore, India ,South Korea, Taiwan, China, etc are gearing their people to excel and be more competitive in their proficiency in english, the Philippines seem to have no plan of their own in maintaining their edge as a nation who excel in the English language. The Philippines is just sitting idly by, dwelling on the past and never even bother thinking about the future. No wonder the Filipino's proficiency in English is deteriorating.

    Also it doesn't help either that the Philippine Board of Education's big man mandated that all Higher Learning Education in the country are obligated to have their students learn the Chinese language and become proficient at it. Rather than mandating Filipinos students to learn the english language and become proficient at it, Filipinos are force to learn the Chinese language that is less valuable to Filipinos than if you were to learn the English language.. The Chinese language is important too, but I think it's even more important that Filipinos must learn the English language first before venturing to learning some other foreign language. The reason for this change, they explained, was that the Filipino-chinese are doing such a fine job with the economy that they felt compelled to show them just how much they appreciate it by making the Chinese language mandatory in all Higher Learning Education in the Philippines , or something to that effect. So how does that gonna help the aspiring Filipino student who wanted to learn the english language so that he/she could be accepted to that job or position that he/she is seeking. When it is more important than ever that Filipinos improved the quality of their english, the Philippines has to make a bad decision like this. I think it is a mistake. Even the Singaporians are very much concerned about the quality of their english...so why shouldn't we? Why not the English language first before the chinese language?






    ********* News Article *************

    Joyful graduation ceremonies are over. Now it’s time for reality check: There aren’t enough jobs out there for the Class of 2002. Among those whose job expectations are the most deflated are graduates of courses in information technology. In the age of cyberspace a career in IT was supposed to be the most promising; the manpower supply couldn’t meet the demand. A two-year course, although relatively expensive for someone from a lower-income family, could quickly have profitable returns. IT held the promise of a high-paying job overseas.

    But then came the tech meltdown. The dotcom bubble burst, Silicon Valley turned into a ghost town and IT no longer beckoned like the proverbial pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. The terror attacks on Sept. 11 last year worsened the economic slowdown.

    The tech sector, however, is starting to recover. So how come our IT graduates are complaining that they can’t find jobs? One reason, according to a recent report, is the Filipino’s deteriorating proficiency in English, lingua franca of information technology. Trade and Industry Secretary Mar Roxas said that with the glut in IT workers, proficiency in English is a major advantage. But many Filipinos can no longer speak English fluently or comprehend instructions in English quickly.

    This is not surprising, since education officials themselves have acknowledged that the teaching of Eng-lish in the country has steadily deteriorated. It has not helped that "Taglish" has come into widespread use – a melange of Tagalog, English, local street slang and "swardspeak" that has resulted in Filipinos losing proficiency in both English and their native language.

    Can the damage be undone? Filipinos used to take pride in their proficiency in both oral and written Eng-lish. It was one of the nation’s few advantages in this highly competitive region. Over the years we have lost this edge, and little has been done to stop the trend. Meanwhile our neighbors are aggressively pushing programs to promote English proficiency. The Philippines has failed to promote genuine bilingualism, and our graduates are paying for it.

  2. #2
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    Post Re: Filipino's deteriorating proficiency in English

    Also it doesn't help either that the Philippine Board of Education's big man mandated that all Higher Learning Education in the country are obligated to have their students learn the Chinese language and become proficient at it.
    Kind of a drastic move, isn't it? Can you provide a link to your source so we can read what it is exactly all about?

    China is poised to become the dominant economic power in Asia and this may be a pro-active move, but offering Chinese language/culture electives (and ensuring their standards) should be enough. Making Chinese language studies a requirement is overkill.

    Why not the English language first before the chinese language?
    I doubt very much that they are placing the learning of Putonghua/Mandarin above that of English, are they??? That would be shocking!

    The reason for this change, they explained, was that the Filipino-chinese are doing such a fine job with the economy that they felt compelled to show them just how much they appreciate it by making the Chinese language mandatory in all Higher Learning Education in the Philippines , or something to that effect.
    Not that compelling a reason, considering Fil-Chis do not even use the official dialect Putonghua/Mandarin.

  3. #3

    Post

    ano ba yung philippine board of education? yun din ang decs at ched? o iba pa? totoo ba na ipipilit nang ituro ang chinese? saang grade o year magsisimulang ituro? dapat habang bata pa, probably sa grade one kasi mahirap matutunan lahat ang chinese characters sa pagsulat at pagbasa. mahaba ring panahon ang gugugulin bago mamaster. hindi parang roman alphabet.

    at sino ba naman daw ang mga magtuturo? aangkat ba ng libo-libong chinese teachers mula sa china? kasi kung yung mga dati nang teachers, e di pa naman sila lahat marunong ng chinese e paano nila yan maituturo? tuturuan muna sila bago makapagturo.

  4. #4
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    Post

    Everything else is deteriorating in the Philippines, not just English!

    Morality, justice, religious beliefs. respect for elders, others and for property, etc!

  5. #5

    Post

    Jonathan Perez
    The news article that I am talking about from above came from abs-cbn.com. The news article came out last year. Here is the link to the news article, though it's no longer available online. I think this is because when abs-cbn.com did a make-over on their web site , they probably change everything else, including the link to that news article. But let me look for another news article similar to this one.
    http://www.abs-cbnnews.com/abs/inews...ok/20010519012

    Although I agree about what you're saying about china, the Philippines should straightened out its priorities first concerning this issue before doing anything else different. The way I see it is that the Philippines should not be making any drastic move by introducing the chinese language as a requirement for all higher learning education in the Philippines when at a time the Philippines's proficiency in its second official language, English, is deteriorating fast. I would just want that the Philippines education system fixed the immidiate problem of the deteriorating english proficiency of filipinos. Then when that problem is solve and the quality of filipino's english proficiency is maintained at a good quality; then mayben we can talk about introducing the chinese language. But first it is important that the quality and the proficiency of Filipinos in using the English language is maintained and up to standard. Let's secure the English language in the Philippines before doing something else.

    Sadirmata
    From what I can remember about the news article, I think that the Philippines Board of Education that I'm talking about is the same as the DECS or the CHED. I should have made it more clearly. Anyways, it's true that the education officials are introducing the chiinese language as a requirement for all higher learning education in the country. The news article didn't mention though what grade or year they're gonna be requiring people to learn the chinese language.

    Boardbuster
    Yup, everything else is deteriorating in the Phils but does anyone notices it? It's business as usual.

  6. #6

    Wink

    DO you know where we should start?

    We should start by disallowing TV Networks to translate cartoon shows in TAGALOG and secondly, eradicate all these senseless Latin American soap opera crap from airing in Philippine TV...

  7. #7

    Post

    Originally posted by boardbuster
    Everything else is deteriorating in the Philippines, not just English!

    Morality, justice, religious beliefs. respect for elders, others and for property, etc!
    i agree

  8. #8
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    Post

    Originally posted by BaLdoMarO
    DO you know where we should start?

    We should start by disallowing TV Networks to translate cartoon shows in TAGALOG and secondly, eradicate all these senseless Latin American soap opera crap from airing in Philippine TV...
    May not be a good idea. This will be infringing on freedom of speech. Once certain sectors are disallowed, then what would follow next? Disallow religious shows, ban showing bikini beauty contests? Heated sex scenes in movies? Until there comes a time when only government contrilled and sponsored shows will be shown on TV and in movie houses?

    The start would be at the audience level. They should be made to appreciate quality shows. It might take a long time before the Filipino audience level of sophistication can be raised but the commercial sponsors should only support and promote quality shows to sell their products.

    If the Filipino consumer will stop or boycott products by companies who sponsor bad shows then maybe the TV industry in the Philippines will mature and grow up.

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  10. #9

    Post

    Uno2tres: the link you posted is dead. Anyway, there is no Philippine Board of Education. There is no move to introduce chinese as a required foreign language subject in college, else, I'd have heard of it.

    Are you sure the article is genuine?

  11. #10

    Post

    It is not only the manner we use the english language that is deteriorating, but the manner we use our own language too. And that bothers me a whole lot more than seeing more Filipinos having incorrect grammar.

    While I may hate the tagalog translation of different programs, I don't think it has adverse effects. The french don't like the english language. They even fine advertisers if their billboards are not in french, yet they are doing well. Other asian countries also translate programs to their native tongue but still they are better off than the Philippines. Also, I don't think that our ability to understand and speak and write english is an advantage. What would be an advantage is if we knew what to do with all the knowledge we have and could have. They have that and it seems we don't.

  12. #11
    god-playing megalomaniac
    Join Date
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    I agree with ibrowse. I wonder why is it a big deal when people commit an error in English grammar, yet errors in Tagalog grammar are being tolerated. Double standard eh?

    And why is English proficiency a big deal? I think we better think of more important things that will accelerate our progess like science and technology, as well as proper implementation of the law.

    Also, we better think on how we could use our own language in discussing matters of technicalities.


    http://www.transatlanticpub.com/cat/bookcover/yest0105.JPG http://www.eldawyforexport.com/palestine.gif

  13. #12

    Post

    I wasn't gonna say something ... but the topic is self-explanatory.

    Originally posted by Yuri_Prime
    I agree with ibrowse. I wonder why is it a big deal when people commits an error in English grammar, yet errors in Tagalog grammar are being tolerated. Double standard eh?

    And why is English proficiency a big deal? I think we better think of more important things that will accelerate our progess like science and teachnology, as well as proper implementation of the law.

    Also, we better think on how we could use our own language in discussing matters of technicalities.

    ...
    Ha ha ha ha ha! ... I wonder why is it a big deal when people commit (no s) an error in English grammar ... and accelerate our progess like science and technology (not teachnology) ... LOL LOL LOL!!!!!

    Deteriorating English, eh?

  14. #13

    Post

    Originally posted by Yuri_Prime
    I agree with ibrowse. I wonder why is it a big deal when people commit an error in English grammar, yet errors in Tagalog grammar are being tolerated. Double standard eh?

    And why is English proficiency a big deal? I think we better think of more important things that will accelerate our progess like science and technology, as well as proper implementation of the law.

    Also, we better think on how we could use our own language in discussing matters of technicalities.
    well, we haven't been really taught to be proud of our own language. if you know english, most filipinos think highly of you. if you screw up your tagalog, some people even find it cool. i agree, double standard talaga.

    but english proficiency really is a big deal economic-wise. kulang tayo sa jobs and right now, the opportunities require english proficiency. also, for us to compete globally, kailangan siya.

    there's really no win-win situation. i was actually glad when the PBA changed its broadcast to filipino and same with the some news broadcast. dati puro english mostly lahat. the downside is that we are exposed less to the english language.

    the best way to improve your english proficiency is to immerse yourself with the language. taking english classes may not be enough.

    it's really hard to strike a balance between the two languages.

  15. #14
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    Post

    Originally posted by dcdr76

    ........
    the best way to improve your english proficiency is to immerse yourself with the language. taking english classes may not be enough.....
    One measure to know that you are proficient in English or any other language and have immersed yourself completely in the language is when you speak and converse with that language in your dreams.

    One may be able to speak another language like English when one is awake but unless one can hear himself and others in one's dream speaking and conversing in English then that person has not gain much proficiency in English yet.

    Even Filipinos who have been in the United States for 3 years or more, they still dream talking in their native dialect or Tagalog, because they still surround themselves with Tagalog or other dialect-speaking Filipinos during their waking hours. Even at work they seek out Filipinos instead of acclimatizing themselves to the English speaking Americans.




    Originally posted by dcdr76
    it's really hard to strike a balance between the two languages.
    American born Filipino children do. Somehow they manage to speak and understand both language, because they grow up in practically and literally three environments, an enviroment of Tagalog speaking parents, relatives and friends of parents and friends of relatives at home and at gatherings and the other environment, school, where they are surrounded by mostly English speaking classmates and playmates and the third environment - their surroundings including movies and TV.

  16. #15

    Post

    Originally posted by Crusher

    One measure to know that you are proficient in English or any other language and have immersed yourself completely in the language is when you speak and converse with that language in your dreams.

    One may be able to speak another language like English when one is awake but unless one can hear himself and others in one's dream speaking and conversing in English then that person has not gain much proficiency in English yet.

    Even Filipinos who have been in the United States for 3 years or more, they still dream talking in their native dialect or Tagalog, because they still surround themselves with Tagalog or other dialect-speaking Filipinos during their waking hours. Even at work they seek out Filipinos instead of acclimatizing themselves to the English speaking Americans.

    American born Filipino children do. Somehow they manage to speak and understand both language, because they grow up in practically and literally three environments, an enviroment of Tagalog speaking parents, relatives and friends of parents and friends of relatives at home and at gatherings and the other environment, school, where they are surrounded by mostly English speaking classmates and playmates and the third environment - their surroundings including movies and TV.
    Heh heh heh ... it's not limited to Tagalog speakers only ... my area of Los Angeles is multi-cultural ... Thais, Vietnamese, Jews, Russians, Mexicans, Guatemalans, Argentinians, Norweigians, Nicaraguans, etc. have those things ... in varying degrees ... we generally speak to each other in English ... oftentimes heavily accented ... sometimes it's hard to understand ... but without English is worse.

  17. #16
    god-playing megalomaniac
    Join Date
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    International S
    Originally posted by dcdr76
    well, we haven't been really taught to be proud of our own language. if you know english, most filipinos think highly of you. if you screw up your tagalog, some people even find it cool. i agree, double standard talaga.
    So the best thing we could do to is to be proficient with our own language first. Reading from the thread starter's first post, those other nations (Singapore, India, South Korea, Taiwan, China) already established proficiency in their own native tongue, and are able to adapt (adopt?) their own language in technical fields such as science and math, whereas, in the Philippines, we don't have mastery of our own language because we give more priority in English.

    U.P. and San Beda now teach Math in Tagalog language. Do you think such move contributes to the deteriorating proficiency in English?

    but english proficiency really is a big deal economic-wise. kulang tayo sa jobs and right now, the opportunities require english proficiency. also, for us to compete globally, kailangan siya.
    Yes English proficiency is needed to be globally competitive, but the next question is, "Does each and every one of us need to master English in order for our country to be globally competitive as a whole?" I think some people do really need to learn English, especially those who’s' job requires a lot of interaction with foreigners. If that is the case, then is deteriorating proficiency in English really a big problem? I don’t think so. As long as we have enough English proficient people to fill those jobs then there shouldn't be really any problem.

    the best way to improve your english proficiency is to immerse yourself with the language. taking english classes may not be enough.
    Certainly!

    [sips coffee]

    Hmmm!! Excuse me Miss Rosanna, but what are you talking about? Please avoid quoting if you will paraphrase what you just quoted.

    http://www.transatlanticpub.com/cat/bookcover/yest0105.JPG http://www.eldawyforexport.com/palestine.gif

  18. #17

    Post

    Originally posted by Yuri_Prime

    ...I think some people do really need to learn English, especially those who’s' job requires a lot of interaction with foreigners. ...

    Hmmm!! Excuse me Miss Rosanna, but what are you talking about? Please avoid quoting if you will paraphrase what you just quoted.

    ...
    Ha ha ha ha ha! LOL LOL LOL! ... when Filipinos immigrate to the US ... and a lot of them do ... they become the FOREIGNERS! Excuse me while I laugh some more. ... ... ... LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL ...

  19. #18
    god-playing megalomaniac
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    International S

    off-topic

    LOL LOL LOL LOL HA HA HA HA HA HA!!!!!! HE HE HE HE HE!!!

    (sometimes spelling everything out is much more felt that smileys)

    http://www.transatlanticpub.com/cat/bookcover/yest0105.JPG http://www.eldawyforexport.com/palestine.gif

  20. #19

    Post Re: off-topic

    Originally posted by Yuri_Prime
    LOL LOL LOL LOL HA HA HA HA HA HA!!!!!! HE HE HE HE HE!!!

    (sometimes spelling everything out is much more felt that smileys)

    ...
    Heh heh heh ... no response regarding the Filipino foreigners ... LOL LOL LOL

  21. #20

    Post

    Quote: Vinta18
    Uno2tres: the link you posted is dead. Anyway, there is no Philippine Board of Education. There is no move to introduce chinese as a required foreign language subject in college, else, I'd have heard of it.

    Are you sure the article is genuine?
    yeah, it's true, the article is genuine. it came out last year from abs-cbn.com. i still have the book mark in my browser but the problem is the article is no longer available online. that's why the link is dead.

    Quote: dcdr76
    ..but english proficiency really is a big deal economic-wise. kulang tayo sa jobs and right now, the opportunities require english proficiency. also, for us to compete globally, kailangan siya.
    Tama ka diyan. Knowledge of the english language is really a big deal to a lot of Filipino, economic-wise that is. Infact the Overseas Workers Welfare Administration recognizes its importance that they are in the process of implementing a program to teach OCW to become proficient in english. This they say will help enhance the qualifications and marketability of OCW and maintain their competitive edge over foreign workers. It's nice to hear that the government is doing something nice for a change.
    See article:
    http://www.philstar.com/philstar/sho...?article=76923

    OFWs to learn English again
    By Mayen Jaymalin
    Publish Date: [Monday, May 06, 2002]


    Just because they’re working overseas doesn’t mean that they can’t go back to school.

    The Philippine government is embarking on a program that would oblige overseas Filipino workers (OFWs) to attend proficiency classes to maintain their competitive edge over other foreign workers.

    "Although proficiency in the English language is not the only basis for the continuous high demand for OFWs, it remains as one of the assets and as such must be preserved," Overseas Workers Welfare Administration (OWWA) chief Wilhelm Soriano said.

    He said the different Philippine consulates abroad have been tasked to hold English classes for Filipino migrant workers.

    But Soriano said the program will first be pilot-tested in Saipan where an estimated 20,000 OFWs are expected to attend special classes to develop their language skills and potentials.

    "The classes are focused on improving the OFWs’ proficiency in the English language as well as develop their writing skills and upgrade the workers’ overall potential," he explained.

    Soriano added that the program would enhance the qualifications of OFWs and increase their marketability compared to their counterparts from other foreign countries.

    Knowledge of the English language, he said, is a big advantage to OFWs whose services are sought by foreign employers.

    The government has observed that other labor-exporting countries like Thailand, Bangladesh and China now require their nationals to undergo English classes prior to deployment.

    There were also reports that the English proficiency of Filipinos has deteriorated in the past years, in effect endangering the employment opportunities of OFWs.

    Soriano said the program will eventually be implemented in various Middle East countries where an estimated 500,000 OFWs are expected to benefit.

    As this developed, the Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE) reported that the stay of an estimated 100,000 undocumented OFWs in Israel would soon be legalized.

    Labor Secretary Patricia Sto. Tomas also said the government of the Philippines and Italy will forge an agreement providing for the legalization of overstaying and undocumented OFWs there.

    "The agreement will hopefully be signed in June," Sto. Tomas said while noting that the agreement was delayed because of the kidnapping of Italian priest Guiseppe Pierantoni.




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