Duterte failure - he can't stop illegal drugs in 6 mos., he said kill him. when? - Page 15 | Local and Foreign Issues | PinoyExchange
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  1. #281
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    wrong thread

  2. #282
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    Duterte’s Wars Aren’t Working for the Philippines

    The great misconception of Rodrigo Duterte’s rule in the Philippines is that a ruthless attitude to resolving this country’s myriad problems might actually work. He tried that with drug dealers, with disastrous and unwarranted results for thousands, before suspending operations.

    Duterte also promised to eliminate the Abu Sayyaf Group, indicating their end would be even swifter and nastier than his eradication of drug dealers after militants began “slaughtering people like chickens.”

    “Kill them, destroy them,” Duterte told the police and military last October, adding his country had the ability to finish the group off within a week.
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    That was an optimistic outlook even for the Abu Sayyaf – a low-grade terrorist outfit with a liking for soft targets – and not enough to save 70-year-old Jurgen Kantner, who was killed after being held for three months by the Islamist militants.

    Kantner was beheaded after the deadline for payment of a $780,000 ransom had passed. His wife, 59-year-old Sabine Merz, was shot dead when the couple’s boat was hijacked.

    Among those killed in the past year were two Canadians and an 18-year-old local. The beheadings and kidnappings occurred around Duterte’s home town of Davao, where he used his record as mayor to run for the presidency in last year’s election.

    Kantner’s death rekindled fears that militants fighting with Islamic State in the Middle East were returning home to create havoc and lick their wounds following a series of defeats in Syria and Iraq. In this case, that’s unlikely.

    The Abu Sayyaf has been on the expansion trail and sworn allegiance to Islamic State, also known as Daesh. But kidnap and ransom, along with banditry, has always been their stock in trade, as opposed political point scoring or fighting for a caliphate. According to risk analysis firm Stratfor, the Abu Sayyaf and their leader Isnilon Hapilon, made $7 million in 2015 alone from kidnap and ransom.

    Duterte and his men insisted they did everything they could to try and save Kanter. “Up to the last moment, many sectors, including the armed forces of the Philippines exhausted all efforts to save his life,” said presidential peace advisor, Jesus Dureza. “We all tried our best but to no avail.”

    Hardly.

    Put simply, the ransom was not paid. Like the Canadian hostages, Kanter was killed, while other Western hostages have been released under previous administrations in Manila when negotiations with the Abu Sayyaf were very difficult but possible.

    It’s a major failure that comes barely a month after Duterte suspended anti-drug operations following the murder of a kidnapped South Korean businessman allegedly by anti-drug police, inside the national police headquarters, who got it wrong.

    A 117-page report titled License to Kill by Human Rights Watch is also warning Duterte’s war against alleged drug dealers and the use of extrajudicial killings could amount to crimes against humanity, as defined by the International Criminal Court.

    “Our investigations into the Philippine ‘drug war’ found that police routinely kill drug suspects in cold blood and then cover up their crime by planting drugs and guns at the scene,” Peter Bouckaert, emergencies director of Human Rights Watch, said. “President Duterte’s role in these killings makes him ultimately responsible for the deaths of thousands.”

    In the final analysis, Duterte has so far failed to eliminate the Abu Sayyaf as he promised. In fact, he’s barely dented their operations and he has failed to secure the release of the too many hostages, local and foreign, being held.

    One exception is an eight-year-old boy, who spent six months in captivity and was freed after an alleged payment was made by his family.

    Given the carnage that followed Duterte’s assumption of office in June, people were right to fear him and his election promises. He kept his word with his bloody crackdowns. But those who backed him under the belief that heavy handed and deadly tactics would resolve some dreadful issues plaguing the Philippines would be right in thinking they got it wrong.

  3. #283
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    College students fall in Davao buy-bust

    DAVAO CITY - Two college students were arrested after authorities recovered three sachets of shabu from their possession Thursday at Times Beach, Matina Aplaya here.

    Authorities apprehended Alexis Joshua Garcia, 21, and Belle Paulina Sagala, 20, during a buy-bust operation.

    Four other students are meanwhile under investigation after they were caught hanging out with the suspects inside a karaoke bar, said Chief Inspector Emerson Pugong, deputy station commander of the San Pedro police station.

    The suspects admitted that they conducted illegal drug transactions inside inns or bars, sourcing the illicit items from Cotabato City, Pugong said.

    Garcia and Sagala will face charges for violating the Comprehensive Dangerous Drugs Act of 2002.

  4. #284
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    Duterte: Handa akong mag-resign kung mabibigo vs ISIS, terror groups sa Mindanao

    Nakahanda umano si Pangulong Rodrigo Duterte na magbitiw sa puwesto sakaling mabigo itong mapuksa ang ISIS o Maute terror group sa bansa partikular sa Mindanao.

    Sinabi ni Pangulong Duterte, ito ang dahilan kaya siya nagdeklara ng Martial Law sa Mindanao para tapusin na ang lahat ng problema sa rehiyong may kinalaman sa law and order.

    Ayon sa Pangulong Duterte, hindi siya magdadalawang-isip na gawin ang mga dapat gawin gaano man karahas matapos lamang ang mga terorista.

    Samantala, handa rin daw ang Pangulong Duterte na magpunta sa Marawi City para kausapin ang mga terorista kung kinakailangan mapalaya lamang ang mga bihag at maibalik na ang kaayusan at kapayapaan sa lugar.

    “Just a few days ago and in the past months, I have always said, do not force my hand into it because if I start to declare martial law, I will solve all the problems of Mindanao connected with law and order. As President, if I cannot confront them, I will resign. If I am incompetent and incapable of keeping order in this country, let me step down and give the job to somebody else. But I will deal with the problem as it is. Most of you were witnesses many years ago when President Marcos declared martial law. It will be solely between the commander in chief and the Armed Forces and the Police. But I will assure you that I will no… I am not willing to allow abuses. Government still running. Congress is functioning. The courts are open for citizens to seek their grievance. But, in keeping with the law and order, it behooves now on the military, the Armed Forces to do what is expected of them – restore order and that martial law covers the area of the whole of entire Jolo, Basilan, and Tawi-Tawi. I am appealing to the humanity of everybody, especially those who sow terror: Do not allow the ISIS to come in. I warn you again: Do not do it because as I have said my response would be harsh. I will not hesitate to do anything and everything to protect and preserve the Filipino nation,” ani Pangulong Duterte.

  5. #285

  6. #286
    it's near.. seunaxx's Avatar
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    Why not? He can say it confidently because Maute group and all these abu sayaff are under his wings. So once he lays out Martial Law in the whole of Phils he will tell these groups to cool off and be ready to be "called back" again if the "need" arises. Evil but not genius indeed.😀

  7. #287
    PAK NA PAK NA PAK!


    Sass Rogando Sasot says:

    Let's call it the "Yellow Syndrome," a rush of compassion and concern for lawless elements, such as drug syndicates, coup plotters, and terrorists.



    Sass Rogando Sasot says:

    Let's call it the "Yellow Syndrome," a rush of compassion and concern for lawless elements, such as drug syndicates, coup plotters, and terrorists.




    Sass Rogando Sasot says:

    Let's call it the "Yellow Syndrome," a rush of compassion and concern for lawless elements, such as drug syndicates, coup plotters, and terrorists.

  8. #288

  9. #289
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    Duterte: I will bring drug problem to its ‘lowest’ before term ends

    President Rodrigo Duterte has vowed to drag the drug problem to its "lowest" point in the remaining five years of his term.

    “I assure you, by the time I make my — kung buhay pa ako — five years from now, drugs will be at its lowest,” he said at the 11th Ambassadors’ Tour Philippine Reception in Davao City on Friday night.

    Duterte’s term will end in 2022.

    A year after he launched a controversial anti-drug campaign that saw the death of thousands of drug suspects, the President on Saturday reiterated that there are four million drug addicts in the country.

    “You know, you create a generation of slaves. Wala nang gawin ‘yan kung hindi maghanap ng droga araw-araw to have his fix. They are addicts, practically slaves to a chemical. And they plunder, they kill if they do not have the money to do it,” he said.

    “Anong gawain ng gobyerno with that kind of insidious—buhayin kita? Hindi kita patayin but I will destroy you. By what? When you destroy a person, you destroy a person. He becomes extinct. That’s really what it is. Huwag kayong pumasok diyan kasi,” he added.

    Duterte had previously issued statements threatening to kill criminals, and offering protection to authorities who would "hunt them down."

    “Get out of my city if you’re doing drugs or other crimes, because if you don’t, I’ll kill you. It is never wrong for a President to say that,” Duterte said.

    “To all the military men and to all the police, go out and hunt for them and I will protect you," he said.

    During the campaign period for the May 2016 elections, Duterte and his running mate Foreign Affairs Sec. Alan Peter Cayetano promised to bring an end to the drug problem in the country, as well as crime and corruption in three to six months. If not, both of them would resign.

    When he became President, Duterte extended his self-imposed deadline, saying he did not expect that narco-politics had become deeply ingrained in Philippine society.

    He also said that the war on drugs would not end until the last pusher in the country had been eradicated

  10. #290
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    UPFRONT: Duterte's drug war won't save the Philippines


  11. #291
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    Failure daw tsk tsk tsk.

  12. #292
    Thou Shall Not...

    Oh dear, oh dear, here goes the Filipinos' president, yet again indulging his love of Killing and Threatening to Kill people just as he sees fit.

    Criminals are still People and are Protected against such actions and statements just like everyone else.

    And Mrs Morales is correct, they are protected.

    Duterte should get to know some Basic Legal points such as :

    1.) To Do Violence To Any Person Is An Assault Punishable Under Law.

    2.) To Threaten Violence To Another Person Is Also Constitutes Assault.

    So Duterte is wasting his time in asking the Ombudsman to "Find him a law that says he cannot threaten to kill people (criminals whom he classes as sub-human)."

    Duterte should know these basic law as a lawyer. Is he really a lawyer? How did he become a lawyer when he does not observe these basic rules?

    He accuses Mrs Morales of 'playing in God' but who is playing God here by making his own pronouncement on those who are human and those who are not.

    As for his other ridiculous claptrap about destroying those who might destroy his country, it is not worth bothering about.

    Duterte needs to brush up not only on law but on definitions of words.

    "A criminal is someone who has been found guilty of a crime in a properly constituted court of law.

    If that is not the case he/she is an innocent person."

    That is why the extra judicial killings of some 10,000+ drug addicts/drug pushers/drug dealers can only be correctly described by the word Murder.

    In short, you have committed a heinous crime of murder, Duterte.

    Even if some of these people had been guilty of crimes at some time, killing them is still murder since they have the same protection under the Law as everyone else.

    All these comments are simple interpretation of basic legal code.

    Duterte seems unable to group these simple things. Perhaps he suffers from the same delusion as the evil Queen of Hearts in Alice in Wonderland who imperiously said "A word means what I say it means."

    But in the real world, no matter how much he (Duterte) might rant and rave and how much he might like to manipulate things, words like
    * criminal
    * innocent
    * murder have definitions that cannot be changed to suit him.

  13. #293
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    Duterte’s War on Drugs: What Has He Achieved?

    Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte promised a savage drug war, the capstone of the campaign that made him the head of the government. With a year now under his belt, indeed change has come but not the kinds of changes he expected. Seven thousand killed before the newspapers stopped counting, perhaps daunted by the scale of the massacre. Some count up to 10,000 dead.

    While there are no reliable numbers, drug use has undoubtedly declined, demand and supply are both down, but not enough to match the ferocity of the campaign. When it slows, the enormous profits will drive supply back up. For now, we can chalk this up as an “achievement,” but at what cost. With a couple of notable examples, all of those who have been killed are the poorest of the poor. It is almost certain that the cocaine snorters at the upper reaches of Philippine society are continuing their recreation.

    It is even debatable how big a problem the Philippines has with drugs. The president fired the chairman of the Dangerous Drugs Board, Benjamin Reyes, in May, when Reyes used the drugs board’s official figures for drug users – 1.8 million, according to a 2015 survey. Duterte has continued to use the figure of 4 million addicts – not users.

    “You’re fired today. Get out of the service,” Duterte was quoted as saying. “You do not contradict your own government…You’re just a civilian member of a board.”

    Duterte has savaged human rights work, attacking rights activists, saying drug addicts are not human so they have no rights. Institutional damage is long term. The heaviest is what the campaign has done to the police. When you have a president ordering you to kill, kill, kill, you begin to think you can do whatever you want. Killing a kidnapped South Korean businessman within the office of the police anti-drug task force within Camp Crame, the national police headquarters, is only the most blatant example. There are surely many more

    What adds to the sense of impunity is Duterte’s promise that no policeman will go to jail when they follow his orders. When a police team entered the Baybay Sub-provincial jail in Leyte and murdered Albuera Mayor Rolando Espinosa and Raul Yap, the National Bureau of Investigation and a Senate investigation called it premeditated murder. Duterte publicly asked them to plead guilty so he could then pardon them. The Department of Justice downgraded the charge to homicide, allowing them to be released on bail. The Senate, including erstwhile supporters of the administration protested, triggering yet another cross-branch fight.

    Past administrations have struggled to reform the corrupt and incompetent national police force. Duterte’s drug war has wiped out all these gains. Statistics show that in 2016, cops patrolled neighborhoods less frequently, conducted fewer investigations, slowed down in serving arrest warrants to wanted persons, and captured fewer high value targets, compared to 2015.

    Yet, last year, the Philippine National Police spent PHP11.754 billion (US$226.8 million) more than the year before that – PHP127.153 billion in 2016, from P115.399 billion in 2015. Murders and homicides under the present administration have risen by 40 percent over the same period the previous year (7,022 in July-November 2016, versus 5,019 in 2015), mostly with the poor as victims.

    The president promised he would stop corruption and he makes a lot of drama about firing people even if he only gets a “whiff” of corruption. He fired two long-time associates, Pete Lavinia and Mike Sueno. Halmen Valdez was collateral damage. But there are reports that all three were victims in vicious factional struggles in the administration. There are persistent rumors that the factions who dominate several agencies are busy making money. In the end, how can Duterte do anything about corruption when he has taken the poster boys and girls of corruption, Gloria Macapagal Arroyo and the Marcoses into the fold?

    Duterte’s unpredictability and the lack of a policy center in the top rungs of the government make it difficult to come to any conclusion about the future. The only certainty is that Duterte will be around for a while. When he recently disappeared from public view for a few days, rumors about his health circulated. He continues to say that he does not really want to stay president for long. But it is wishful thinking that he will be gone before the end of his term for whatever reason. It is clear he is warming to the position, enjoys the perks and power of the presidency.

    He gave himself a massive Malacanang budget, PHP20.03 billion (US$430.3 million) for 2017 – an increase of more than PHP17 billion, or about US$370 million from the PHP2.87 billion in the last budget of President Aquino. He also enjoys political tourism – 21 foreign trips in one year compared to eight under Aquino. He spent P386.2 million, almost twice what Aquino and GMA spent in two years. And Marawi has given him an excuse to spend more time in Mindanao.

    There is a backlog of crucial tasks. More than a month after it started May 23, the siege of Marawi continues. The military operations will probably end soon, but the political task, finding a formula that will engage the restive Moro population, is just beginning. He seems to have realized that he has to revive the Bangsamoro Basic Law giving autonomy to Mindanao Muslims. Hopefully it will pass the legislature expeditiously. What he can offer the Misuari faction of the MNLF is not yet clear. But even if he is able to find formulas to satisfy the Maguindanao (MILF), and the Tausug (MNLF Misuari), he has to devise something for the Maranao who are the ethnic base of the Maute. It is difficult to say how far talks with the NDF will go other than it will continue because it is in both side’s interests to continue talking.

    A number of Duterte initiatives – restoring the death penalty, lowering the age of criminal accountability, have been overrun by controversy. A more important initiative, postponing barangay elections yet again, and giving Duterte the power to appoint barangay officials is being revived. But sources in the House of Representatives, which will not resume sessions until the day before SONA (State of the Nation Address) in the third week of July, doubt whether it can be passed before the scheduled barangay elections in October. The same sources say it is not likely that representatives will support giving up the power to determine who will become barangay captains.

    Duterte has to do something about the disarray in his cabinet. He cannot benefit from “divide and rule” within his inner circle. The problems in rice policy, exacerbated by lack of rapport between executives, will spill over into other areas of anti-poverty work. Duterte has to decide what to do about Speaker Alvarez who is fast making enemies within the Duterte camp. It is one thing to fight hard against opponents of the regime, another to weaken the pro-Duterte ranks by fighting against factions within. Lawyer Duterte has to make up his mind what to do with his Solicitor General, who has become an object of ridicule among lawyers. He has to crack the whip on a grossly inefficient “Office of the President.” Eventually time and approval will run out on him, as it has on too many other Filipino strongmen.

  14. #294
    It will take many years to solve the drug problem in the country. Mexico continues to experience similar even given large amounts of military funding from the U.S.

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