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  1. #81
    Get Some! allaninq's Avatar
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    ayos ah, konting basa ng history TS. "walang saysay sa bayan"

  2. #82
    ρ(∂v/∂t+v•∇v)=-∇p+∇•T+f Dacs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by starczamora View Post
    ^ but that can be taught. para namang natuto tayong mag-Tagalog overnight.
    Which would you rather choose? Reinforcing our English program or teaching Spanish, given the limited funding our government can afford?

  3. #83
    Shovin' it down your throat cybernaut's Avatar
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    Most Filipinos can't speak and can barely understand English, tapos mag-iintroduce at magtuturo pa ng third language?! This is incredibly stupid.

    anyway, ang mabuti pa itanong na lang natin sa mga nag-aral at nag-aaral sa POVEDA kung ano ang saysay ng Spanish sa buhay nila.
    Last edited by cybernaut; Jun 15, 2009 at 12:41 PM.

  4. #84
    Baja Moderator starczamora's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dacs View Post
    Which would you rather choose? Reinforcing our English program or teaching Spanish, given the limited funding our government can afford?
    You probably didn't get to read the news that the Spanish government will help in shouldering the expenses of propagating Spanish in its former colony.

  5. #85
    maski na libre yan, paglalaunan din yan ng panahon ng mga tao ng gobyerno. at para saang gamit at saysay? WALA!

    baluktot ang mga priorities!

  6. #86
    Quote Originally Posted by starczamora View Post
    You probably didn't get to read the news that the Spanish government will help in shouldering the expenses of propagating Spanish in its former colony.
    I just have to ask: What for?

  7. #87
    Like I said before it can be used for future business transactions to Latin American countries. Better have a headstart. I'd rather have this as an elective rather than those biblical studies.

    English can self taught due to different available mediums. We study this from pre-school to college so there is no one to blame but the student himself for his lack of compression and the likes.

  8. #88
    Quote Originally Posted by swimbod21 View Post
    Like I said before it can be used for future business transactions to Latin American countries. Better have a headstart. I'd rather have this as an elective rather than those biblical studies.

    English can self taught due to different available mediums. We study this from pre-school to college so there is no one to blame but the student himself for his lack of compression and the likes.
    This is the reason why we should focus on improving our English, instead of promoting another language. Self-taught? If i read a Physics book over and over can i be a physicist? If everything can be self-taught then lets just abolish all of the schools and universities in the Philippines.

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  10. #89
    got balls sargo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by swimbod21 View Post
    Like I said before it can be used for future business transactions to Latin American countries. Better have a headstart. I'd rather have this as an elective rather than those biblical studies.

    English can self taught due to different available mediums. We study this from pre-school to college so there is no one to blame but the student himself for his lack of compression and the likes.
    there is no such thing as language can be self taught. you did not learn to read and write on your own - you needed to be taught how to read the alphabet, read and understand meanings of words and finally compose a sentence. that is just the basic, but even on that you needed to be taught these things.

    if english is that easy to learn that it can be self-taught, why then are filipinos, INCLUDING teachers very bad at it?

    from an article, previous post:
    Russ Sandlin, an American businessman in the Philippines, recently closed his call center in Manila because he said he could not find enough English proficient workers. “Not even 3 percent of the students who graduate college here are employable in call centers,” he complained.

    ----

    Adding to this, the Department of Education reported that 80 percent of secondary school teachers in the Philippines failed in an English proficiency test in 2007.

    So where is the veracity of those claims that the Philippines have a substantial pool of English-proficient workers?

    A friend who works in the HR department for one of the Manila offices of Canadian telecom, Telus, said that they interview an average of 50 people a day and only manage to hire two or three applicants.

  11. #90
    Americans are worse at spelling than Britons, with more than half unable to spell "embarrassed", "liaison" and "millennium".
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/news...o-Britons.html


    It is not only the minorities, the poor, the Spanish-speaking young who are having trouble; the same pattern is evident among the white middle class.

    Examples can be found across the nation:

    > Last year the Association of American Publishers' guide to reading textbooks, a guide intended for college freshmen, had to be rewritten for a ninth-grade reading level.

    > The City University of New York spent $15 million last year on remedial English courses. Many of the students enrolling under an open-admissions policy are reading below the ninth-grade level.

    > In 1957, the average verbal score on the national Scholastic Aptitude Tests was 473 (on a scale from 200 to 800). In 1973, the average was down 33 points, to 440.

    > More than one-third of the students who want to become journalism majors in their junior year at the University of Wisconsin did not meet minimum admissions standards in grammar, spelling, punctuation and word usage. At the University of North Carolina's journalism school, 39% of the students flunked the basic spelling test.
    http://www.time.com/time/magazine/ar...913427,00.html

    Filipinos poor in own language — PASATAF
    "It was revealed during the annual Pambansang Kapulungan sa Filipino held in Teacher’s Camp here on May 4-7 that Filipino literacy is low especially among students due to reasons ranging from system to politics. "
    http://www.nordis.net/blog/?p=3914

    Poor English - a Threat to the Philippine Call Centers?

    DESPITE the Philippines is considered as one of the third largest English speaking countries in Asia yet the report released by the US State Department, in its “2007 Investment Climate Statement” this month cited that the “English language proficiency, while still better than in other Southeast Asian nations, is declining in the Philippines.”

    I learned that various sectors put the pressure to President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo on how she will address the report. She kept on saying that English should use as primary medium of instruction in all schools nationwide.

    These call center leaders blamed the soap operas dubbed in Pilipino, and too much focusing on cell phone text messaging. The education sector blamed the influence of pop culture and the domestic media, where the dominant language is Taglish, a combination of Tagalog and English.

    http://www.articlesbase.com/outsourc...rs-363691.html


    Ok, Now we have Americans who cannot speak proper English. Filipinos who are having difficulties in both Filipino and English.
    A President that is promoting the usage of English and Spanish.
    A Government department developing the usage of Filipino.
    Local businesses supporting the usage of English.
    Local media's usage of Taglish contributes to the deterioration of English proficiency.

  12. #91
    Quote Originally Posted by RetroManila View Post
    I just have to ask: What for?
    What for??

    Spain positions the Philippines as platform for foray into Asia

    BY MARITES S. VILLAMOR, Visayas Bureau Chief

    CEBU — Spain aims to improve economic, development and cultural cooperation with the Philippines, a Spanish colony for over three centuries, as it sets its sights again on Asia.

    "The Philippines is a country that has always been a priority [of Spain] in cooperation. It is a good platform for us in a continent that holds half of the global population. We probably entered the market late, but this Tribuna [event] offers unique opportunities for Spain and the Philippines to improve bilateral relations," said Gustavo Suarez Pertierra, head of the 24-member Spanish delegation that is visiting Cebu for the 4th Tribuna España Filipinas that opened on Wednesday afternoon.

    The Tribuna, which was organized by Casa Asia, gathers together civil society members of Spain and the Philippines in a bid to strengthen bilateral relations between the two countries in the areas of business, tourism, culture and the arts.

    Casa Asia is a public consortium that was formed to implement Spain’s policy to reinforce its presence in Asia and the Pacific.

    Philippine Ambassador to Spain Antonio M. Lagdameo said representatives of several Spanish financial institutions have expressed interest in financing more development projects in the Philippines.

    "They feel they have not done enough [for the Philippines]. They feel they can assist us, considering the lengthy relations we’ve have. Inspite of the crisis, there are still sources of development financing for us because the big financial institutions in Spain are not affected," Mr. Lagdameo explained.

    He added that they still have to identify the priority sectors that could benefit from development cooperation.

    Groundwork

    Franklin M. Ebdalin, acting Foreign Affairs secretary, said the Philippine government had laid the groundwork to strengthen trade relations with Spain by reopening in 2006 the Philippine Trade and Investment Center in Madrid. The center has been receiving inquiries on business and investment opportunities in the Philippines, he added.

    Total trade between the Philippines and Spain grew by average 10% for the last five years, but Mr. Lagdameo said this could still increase.

    Filipino speakers during the forum encouraged the Spanish delegation to invest in biofuels manufacturing and infrastructure projects in the country.

    Rolando T. Dy, executive director for the Center for Food and Agribusiness, as well as Sebastian R. Lacson, vice-president for administration of the Visayan Electric Co., Inc., noted the growing demand for biofuels as the Philippines implements Republic Act No. 9367, or the Biofuels Act of 2006.

    Isidro Consunji, president of DMCI Holdings, Inc., cited opportunities in infrastructure as the government pushes closer public-private sector partnerships in implementing projects.

    "We had a partnership with Spain for the Northrail project but that didn’t work out. We need government support for such projects. Now that we have it, there are a lot of opportunities in the infrastructure sector," Mr. Consunji said.

    Meanwhile, Mr. Ebdalin said promoting the teaching and learning of the Spanish language in schools nationwide has deepened cultural cooperation between the two countries.

    "Spanish [language] is a part of Filipino heritage. Learning this will also give Filipinos competitive advantage because some 400 million people worldwide speak Spanish," Mr. Ebdalin said.

    President Gloria M. Arroyo issued Memorandum Orer 276 in November last year, directing the Department of Education, Commission on Higher Education and the Technical Education Skills and Development Authority to promote the teaching of Spanish.

  13. #92
    Ok. Since this is a partnership, are they going to learn Tagalog as well?

    Or we're the one to adjust and follow them like a dog?

  14. #93
    got balls sargo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by esagerato View Post
    What for??

    Spain positions the Philippines as platform for foray into Asia

    BY MARITES S. VILLAMOR, Visayas Bureau Chief

    CEBU — Spain aims to improve economic, development and cultural cooperation with the Philippines, a Spanish colony for over three centuries, as it sets its sights again on Asia.

    "The Philippines is a country that has always been a priority [of Spain] in cooperation. It is a good platform for us in a continent that holds half of the global population. We probably entered the market late, but this Tribuna [event] offers unique opportunities for Spain and the Philippines to improve bilateral relations," said Gustavo Suarez Pertierra, head of the 24-member Spanish delegation that is visiting Cebu for the 4th Tribuna España Filipinas that opened on Wednesday afternoon.

    The Tribuna, which was organized by Casa Asia, gathers together civil society members of Spain and the Philippines in a bid to strengthen bilateral relations between the two countries in the areas of business, tourism, culture and the arts.

    Casa Asia is a public consortium that was formed to implement Spain’s policy to reinforce its presence in Asia and the Pacific.

    Philippine Ambassador to Spain Antonio M. Lagdameo said representatives of several Spanish financial institutions have expressed interest in financing more development projects in the Philippines.

    "They feel they have not done enough [for the Philippines]. They feel they can assist us, considering the lengthy relations we’ve have. Inspite of the crisis, there are still sources of development financing for us because the big financial institutions in Spain are not affected," Mr. Lagdameo explained.

    He added that they still have to identify the priority sectors that could benefit from development cooperation.

    Groundwork

    Franklin M. Ebdalin, acting Foreign Affairs secretary, said the Philippine government had laid the groundwork to strengthen trade relations with Spain by reopening in 2006 the Philippine Trade and Investment Center in Madrid. The center has been receiving inquiries on business and investment opportunities in the Philippines, he added.

    Total trade between the Philippines and Spain grew by average 10% for the last five years, but Mr. Lagdameo said this could still increase.

    Filipino speakers during the forum encouraged the Spanish delegation to invest in biofuels manufacturing and infrastructure projects in the country.

    Rolando T. Dy, executive director for the Center for Food and Agribusiness, as well as Sebastian R. Lacson, vice-president for administration of the Visayan Electric Co., Inc., noted the growing demand for biofuels as the Philippines implements Republic Act No. 9367, or the Biofuels Act of 2006.

    Isidro Consunji, president of DMCI Holdings, Inc., cited opportunities in infrastructure as the government pushes closer public-private sector partnerships in implementing projects.

    "We had a partnership with Spain for the Northrail project but that didn’t work out. We need government support for such projects. Now that we have it, there are a lot of opportunities in the infrastructure sector," Mr. Consunji said.

    Meanwhile, Mr. Ebdalin said promoting the teaching and learning of the Spanish language in schools nationwide has deepened cultural cooperation between the two countries.

    "Spanish [language] is a part of Filipino heritage. Learning this will also give Filipinos competitive advantage because some 400 million people worldwide speak Spanish," Mr. Ebdalin said.

    President Gloria M. Arroyo issued Memorandum Orer 276 in November last year, directing the Department of Education, Commission on Higher Education and the Technical Education Skills and Development Authority to promote the teaching of Spanish.
    the above does not change or address the argument that this country needs to be better in english than any other foreign language. english is the second most widely spoken and written language in this country and it is a language that business/industry, educators, including the department of education admit filipinos have become inadequate in.

    are we now supposed to promote the language of every country who gives us aid?

    one more thing, i bet when they talked about spain's intent to give the country aid and engage in trade, they used english to communicate with each other. mentioned that to drive home the point that english is more important than spanish in our country.

  15. #94
    got balls sargo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RetroManila View Post
    Ok. Since this is a partnership, are they going to learn Tagalog as well?

    Or we're the one to adjust and follow them like a dog?
    that is not going to happen. i also think when they talked about this, they most likely spoke in english, not in pilipino, not in spanish.

  16. #95
    Quote Originally Posted by RetroManila View Post
    Ok. Since this is a partnership, are they going to learn Tagalog as well?

    Or we're the one to adjust and follow them like a dog?
    We already adjusted and followed America like a dog already. No need to change that fact. Actually the Spanish forced us to follow them like a dog (for 300 years). But now we are following America like a dog on our own free will.

    Quote Originally Posted by sargo View Post
    the above does not change or address the argument that this country needs to be better in english than any other foreign language……..they used english to communicate with each other. mentioned that to drive home the point that english is more important than spanish in our country.

    We are not the only country having trouble with English.

    The facts are the President and major businesses are already encouraging the people to use and build their English language skills. Our education system uses English as the main medium of communication. We are already prioritizing English more than another Language, to the extent that our own language is deteriorating.(This is partly due to the influence of pop culture and the domestic media promoting Taglish usage.)

    Therefore I believe most Filipinos can understand and communicate in English. However to gain English language fluency…. Maybe we should listen to, and watch more English language Programming. (I think it is as simple as that).

  17. #96
    Maybe we should all strive to become like "Inday".

    "Inday" is able to speak English , Spanish , and Tagalog fluently.

    See sample:

    Consul: Why do you wanna go to the US?
    Amo: To travel to visit friends and fly the airplane.
    Consul: Denied!

    Consul: And you?
    Inday: For life is a never-ending pursuit of material and social satisfaction that I tender my great intent of actualizing a transpacific journey to the land of milk and honey. An affable sanctuary where dreams become reality and a perfect habitat where souls like mine can reach the pedestal of freedom.
    Consul: Lifetime multiple entry VISA granted!

    Amo: Whaaat!!!


    ----------

    Overnight, inaral ng amo ni inday ang dictionary para may pangtapat na siya kay inday

    Amo: so inday, tell me, how do you accept the fact that you are just a mere chaimbermaid in this extravagant mansion??

    Inday:una camarera?eres tan pathetic. La unica razon que inscribi tu casa es porque nada esta sucediendo dentro de tu casa cuasi-agradable. Quisiera traer una poca clase en este hogar pero conjeturo que no puedo porque esta casa es fea.

    Amo: what??!!(dumudugo na ilong)

    --------------------------------

    Amo: Mula ngayon, wala nang magsasalita ng Ingles. Ang sinumang magpadugo ng ilong ko at sa mga anak ko, palalayasin sa pamamahay na ‘to. klaro ba?

    Inday: Ang mga namutawi sa inyong mga labi ay mataman ko pong iiimbak sa sulok ng aking balintataw, sa kaibuturan ng aking puso, gugunamgunamin, aariing salik ng aba at payak kong kabatiran. Tatalikdan ang matayog at palalong banyagang wika, manapay kakalingain, bibigkasin at sakdal timyas na sasambitin ng aking sangkolooban.

  18. #97
    I think during 1950s and 1960s plenty of people where able to speak spanish and English fuently. It was also during this time that we were considered one of the most prosperous nation in Asia.(I think)

    And to reiterate the "saysay" of Spanish to the country. Check out this linkhttp://dic.academic.ru/dic.nsf/enwiki/439988

  19. #98
    ^^ and the fact there were more newspapers and magazines in spanish than in english in the philippines prior to the 2nd World War...


    Gusto ninyo ng proof???


    The First Philippine Constitution(1899)

    http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d85/el_chico_loco/El20Heraldo20de20la20Revolucion.jpg

    Act of the proclamation of Philippine Independence proclaimed in Kawit Cavite on June 12, 1898...

    http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d85/el_chico_loco/acta.gif

    A reprint of the first ever advertisement of coca-cola in the philippines during the American era.. (courtesy of Meralco museum)

    http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d85/el_chico_loco/ad25ne.jpg

    Spanish maintained its primacy in the Philippines as evidenced by the 200 daily newspapers and magazines in that language1903-1945)


    The most popular and influential were those published in Manila, Cebu and Iloilo:
    El Renacimiento, La Democracia, La Vanguardia, El debate, La Opinion, El Mercantil, La Independencia, La Republica Filipina, and La Voz de Manila.


    Bilingual(In Spanish and English): Manila Daily Bulletin, Philippines Free Press,

    Marami ring magazines like Cultura Social, Excelsior, El Obrero, Kirikiri, etc...

    Filipino newspaper in Spanish(1944)

    http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d85/el_chico_loco/1883_1.jpg

    Magazine in Spanish(1925)

    http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d85/el_chico_loco/image002-5.gif

    Kung gusto niyo pa ng mas maraming proof, marami pa kong clippings, nakakatamad lang ipost lahat..

  20. #99
    ρ(∂v/∂t+v•∇v)=-∇p+∇•T+f Dacs's Avatar
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    ^And Spanish curriculum would have made much more sense during that time.

    But how about now?

  21. #100
    ^^why is it hard for you to understand that Spanish will not become mandatory in all philippine schools?? It will only be optional in selected schools. Naging generous lang naman ang Spain sa pagtulong sa Pilipinas na i reintroduce ang Spanish para matulungang matuto yung mga gustong mag aral nito. What's wrong with that?? Now if China, Japan etc would also become willing to offer assistance in offering language courses in the future, eh di mas maganda! the more languages we know, the better we will become...

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